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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. Search the whole document.

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Suffolk County (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
nicipalities; viz., the cities of Boston and Chelsea, and the towns of North Chelsea and Winthrop. Since the war the city of Roxbury and the town of Dorchester, in Norfolk County, have been annexed to the city of Boston. The population of Suffolk County in 1860 was 192,678; in 1865 it was 208,219,—an increase in five years of 15,541. The valuation of the county in 1860 was three hundred and twenty millions of dollars ($320,000,000); in 1865 it was three hundred and eighty-one millions three hundred and ninety-one thousand two hundred and eighty-one dollars ($381,391,281), being an increase of upwards of sixty-one millions of dollars in five years. By the returns made by the city and town authorities in 1866 Suffolk County furnished twenty-eight thousand four hundred and sixty-nine men for the war (28,469), which is undoubtedly correct; each place had a surplus over and above all demands which in the aggregate amounted to 5,231. The aggregate expenditure of the cities and towns
Chelsea (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
unicipalities; viz., the cities of Boston and Chelsea, and the towns of North Chelsea and Winthrop.had been procured, and that certain ladies of Chelsea had volunteered to make the flag, and had pre The following is a copy of the letter:— Chelsea, April 20, 1861. To E. W. Lothrop, Esq., in behalf of the citizens of Chelsea. Sir,—Allow us to present you a trifling memento of our patriot:— Whereas the government and citizens of Chelsea having received intelligence of the death on ed the bodies to be embalmed and forwarded to Chelsea for burial. The names of the slain were Geortaff, and a vast concourse of the citizens of Chelsea. The funeral procession was very long, businpany H, First Massachusetts Regiment, our own Chelsea volunteers, on the 26th of April, 1862, beforf the deceased. mayor's office, city Hall, Chelsea, June 21, 1862. To the city council; I has therefore by the corporation of the city of Chelsea— Resolved, That since the days of Washingt[8 more.
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
y-fourth, and other Boston regiments on their return from the seat of war. June 29th, The chief of police, under direction of the mayor and the chairman of the committee of Boston volunteers, was authorized to close any street against the passage of horse-cars and other vehicles, which may be deemed necessary to facilitate the passage through the city of any regiment going to or returning from the seat of war. July 27th, A joint committee of the two branches was appointed to proceed to Gettysburg, Pa., to procure a suitable lot in the cemetery in that place, and cause the remains of the Boston soldiers which can be found, and are not claimed by their friends, to be buried therein, and a suitable monument to be erected over the same. July 27th, A message was received from the mayor in regard to the draft riots which took place a few days before, which was properly considered and acted upon. See volume I. pages 475 to 480 inclusive. Five hundred thousand dollars were appropriated
Suffolk County (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
Chapter 14: Suffolk County. This county although the smallest in territory is the most populous and wealthy in the State. It contained during the period of the war but four municipalities; viz., the cities of Boston and Chelsea, and the towns of North Chelsea and Winthrop. Since the war the city of Roxbury and the town of Dorchester, in Norfolk County, have been annexed to the city of Boston. The population of Suffolk County in 1860 was 192,678; in 1865 it was 208,219,—an increase in five years of 15,541. The valuation of the county in 1860 was three hundred and twenty millions of dollars ($320,000,000); in 1865 it was three hundred and eighty-one millions three hundred and ninety-one thousand two hundred and eighty-one dollars ($381,391,281), being an increase of upwards of sixty-one millions of dollars in five years. By the returns made by the city and town authorities in 1866 Suffolk County furnished twenty-eight thousand four hundred and sixty-nine men for the war (2
Tampa Bay (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ollars for the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers. July 19th, Voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who enlists for three years and is credited to the quota of the town, and the treasurer was authorized to borrow fifteen hundred dollars to pay the same. At this meeting a letter was read from Captain William B. Eaton of North Chelsea, commanding the United States barque Ethan Allen, presenting a rebel flag captured by him near Tampa Bay, Florida, from a blockade runner; which created much enthusiasm, and called forth several patriotic speeches from prominent citizens. A vote of thanks was passed to Captain Eaton. August 19th, The bounty to each volunteer was increased to two hundred dollars, including those for nine months service. The treasurer was authorized to borrow not exceeding two thousand dollars to pay the same. November 4th, The treasurer was directed to borrow one thousand dollars for the payment of State aid to
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ression of our fealty to the Union, and our determination to uphold the honor of that flag under whose folds we have achieved all that has been great and prosperous in our history, the committee on Faneuil Hall be requested to cause the American Flag to be hoisted upon the staff over Faneuil Hall every day except Sunday until otherwise ordered. On the same day a communication was received by the mayor from Governor Andrew informing him that he expected from twelve to fifteen hundred Massachusetts troops in the city, who might remain for a day or two previous to leaving the State, and asking the use of Faneuil Hall or any other public rooms for their accommodation. The communication was immediately considered, and the use of Faneuil Hall and any other buildings under the control of the city was freely tendered to the Governor. Alderman Wilson introduced and read the following preamble and resolutions:— Whereas the city of Boston still retains amidst all vicissitudes its re
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 14
s of soldiers who have been transferred to the invalid corps the same as before. November 16, The committee on public buildings was directed to prepare forthwith the ward-rooms for recruiting purposes. Nothing more of particular interest or importance appears to have been necessary on the part of the city in regard to the war during this year. 1864. January 11th, A joint committee of which Alderman Clapp was chairman was appointed to tender to the returning companies and regiments of New-England volunteers which arrive in Boston such hospitalities as they may deem expedient and necessary. This committee discharged its duties with great fidelity. Each regiment which passed through Boston was hospitably entertained with a good meal at Faneuil Hall. It was also ordered that the board of aldermen, with such as the common council may join, be a committee upon the subject of volunteer enlistments, and to take such steps for raising the quota of Boston as they may deem expedient. M
Dorchester, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
Chapter 14: Suffolk County. This county although the smallest in territory is the most populous and wealthy in the State. It contained during the period of the war but four municipalities; viz., the cities of Boston and Chelsea, and the towns of North Chelsea and Winthrop. Since the war the city of Roxbury and the town of Dorchester, in Norfolk County, have been annexed to the city of Boston. The population of Suffolk County in 1860 was 192,678; in 1865 it was 208,219,—an increase in five years of 15,541. The valuation of the county in 1860 was three hundred and twenty millions of dollars ($320,000,000); in 1865 it was three hundred and eighty-one millions three hundred and ninety-one thousand two hundred and eighty-one dollars ($381,391,281), being an increase of upwards of sixty-one millions of dollars in five years. By the returns made by the city and town authorities in 1866 Suffolk County furnished twenty-eight thousand four hundred and sixty-nine men for the war (2
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
families, as provided by law, to be expended under the direction of the mayor and aldermen. The committee on police was authorized to pay State aid for the present to those families that were in immediate want of assistance. August 15th, It was ordered by the aldermen that a joint special committee be appointed to consider and report what action was necessary on the part of the city government in relation to Chelsea soldiers who had lost their lives in the late battle with the rebels at Bull Run. Aldermen Boynton, Churchill, and Bisbee were appointed on the part of the board, and on the 2d of September the order having been concurred in, Messrs. Hadaway, Pearmain, and Buck were appointed on the part of the common council. It was also ordered that State aid be continued to the families of the soldiers who had fallen or died in the battle of Bull Run. September 16th, The joint committee appointed at the previous meeting reported in favor of the adoption of resolutions passed by a ci
Roxbury, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
Chapter 14: Suffolk County. This county although the smallest in territory is the most populous and wealthy in the State. It contained during the period of the war but four municipalities; viz., the cities of Boston and Chelsea, and the towns of North Chelsea and Winthrop. Since the war the city of Roxbury and the town of Dorchester, in Norfolk County, have been annexed to the city of Boston. The population of Suffolk County in 1860 was 192,678; in 1865 it was 208,219,—an increase in five years of 15,541. The valuation of the county in 1860 was three hundred and twenty millions of dollars ($320,000,000); in 1865 it was three hundred and eighty-one millions three hundred and ninety-one thousand two hundred and eighty-one dollars ($381,391,281), being an increase of upwards of sixty-one millions of dollars in five years. By the returns made by the city and town authorities in 1866 Suffolk County furnished twenty-eight thousand four hundred and sixty-nine men for the war (
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