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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865. Search the whole document.

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Poolesville (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ichigan men were forced to do guard duty with sticks until fitted out by the general government, as they brought no muskets with them. The Nineteenth Regiment was assigned to the brigade of Gen. Frederick W. Lander and ordered to march to Poolesville, Md., then the headquarters of that division, known as the Corps of Observation, Gen. Charles P. Stone, commanding. The march was from Washington through Leesboro, Rockville and Darnestown. It was the first march made by the men and to the tef the march the men camped by the side of a stream. Supper was cooked with water taken from this stream and on the following morning a dead mule was found above the camp, it having been in the middle of the stream for at least three days. Poolesville was reached on the following evening, and the men were greeted by the members of the Fifteenth Massachusetts Regiment, and the various companies of that organization entertained the corresponding companies of the Nineteenth. They had been war
Meridian Hill (United States) (search for this): chapter 3
Chapter 3: in camp at Meridian Hill. As soon as the camp at Meridian Hill was established Major Howe was appointed instructor of officers and men in guard duty, police, etc.; Lieut. Col. Devereux instructor of officers and men in school of the soldier, school of the company, etc.; while Colonel Hinks was instructor of the regMeridian Hill was established Major Howe was appointed instructor of officers and men in guard duty, police, etc.; Lieut. Col. Devereux instructor of officers and men in school of the soldier, school of the company, etc.; while Colonel Hinks was instructor of the regiment in the school of the battalion and in skirmishing, and of the officers in making papers, muster-rolls and returns. The regiment was drilled by company or by battalion eight hours in each day, and an officers' school was held at headquarters three evenings each week. Each Sunday was given over to the reading of the Articleus of all this unaccustomed toil. Of the future worth of all this drill, fatigue and labor, many had small idea and few had none whatever. When encamped at Meridian Hill, the Seventh Michigan Regiment arrived and camped on the opposite side of the street. Close friendships immediately sprang up between the men of the Nineteent
Swan Point (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
th Michigan, Forty-Second New York (Tammany), Captain Saunders' Company of Sharpshooters (First Company of Massachusetts Sharpshooters) and Captain Vaughn's battery of Rhode Island Artillery. Small bunches of recruits were received from various sources while here, 43 being added from the 14th of September to the 27th. Shortly after the command was located at Camp Benton, six companies of the regiment, Companies A, B, C, D, E and F, were detailed, at various times, as pickets along the Potomac River, between Shelden's Island and Conrad's Ferry. Companies B, C, and E, were stationed below the crossing at Edward's Ferry,—D, above it, and, still further to the right, opposite Harrison's Island, were companies F. and A. On their right was the line of the Fifteenth Massachusetts. They continued on this duty until the disaster at Ball's Bluff, three weeks later. The rebel pickets were on the other side of the river, within easy hailing distance, and the music of their bands, playing D
Lynnfield (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
they be shot, or such other punishment as may be inflicted by courtmartial. Sunday morning inspection was also established and the first one was decidedly amusing. The order was for all men to be in the line. This included everyone connected with the regiment, cooks, clerks, teamsters, detailed men, etc. The regular members of the regiment were much interested at seeing the extra men in line. The wagoner of one of the companies had not seen his musket since he first received it at Lynnfield. He knew nothing of the manual, neither did the regimental mail carrier. As Lieut. Col. Devereux came down the line and the men threw up their guns for inspection, the first named did it in fairly good shape, having watched his comrades on the right. The officer looked at his musket and then at him. What do you mean by bringing such a musket for inspection? It ought to be all right, said the wagoner. It's brand new and I've never used it since it was given to me. With a reprim
Michigan (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ey cursed more and more the grim figure at headquarters, who was the genius of all this unaccustomed toil. Of the future worth of all this drill, fatigue and labor, many had small idea and few had none whatever. When encamped at Meridian Hill, the Seventh Michigan Regiment arrived and camped on the opposite side of the street. Close friendships immediately sprang up between the men of the Nineteenth and those of the Seventh, which lasted during the entire service of the regiments. The Michigan men were forced to do guard duty with sticks until fitted out by the general government, as they brought no muskets with them. The Nineteenth Regiment was assigned to the brigade of Gen. Frederick W. Lander and ordered to march to Poolesville, Md., then the headquarters of that division, known as the Corps of Observation, Gen. Charles P. Stone, commanding. The march was from Washington through Leesboro, Rockville and Darnestown. It was the first march made by the men and to the tende
Rockville, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
e Seventh, which lasted during the entire service of the regiments. The Michigan men were forced to do guard duty with sticks until fitted out by the general government, as they brought no muskets with them. The Nineteenth Regiment was assigned to the brigade of Gen. Frederick W. Lander and ordered to march to Poolesville, Md., then the headquarters of that division, known as the Corps of Observation, Gen. Charles P. Stone, commanding. The march was from Washington through Leesboro, Rockville and Darnestown. It was the first march made by the men and to the tender-feet a very hard one. It developed the interesting fact, however, that the boys who were fresh from school or indoor life, could endure more than the men of mature years who had at first laughed at them. On the first night of the march the men camped by the side of a stream. Supper was cooked with water taken from this stream and on the following morning a dead mule was found above the camp, it having been in t
Darnestown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ch lasted during the entire service of the regiments. The Michigan men were forced to do guard duty with sticks until fitted out by the general government, as they brought no muskets with them. The Nineteenth Regiment was assigned to the brigade of Gen. Frederick W. Lander and ordered to march to Poolesville, Md., then the headquarters of that division, known as the Corps of Observation, Gen. Charles P. Stone, commanding. The march was from Washington through Leesboro, Rockville and Darnestown. It was the first march made by the men and to the tender-feet a very hard one. It developed the interesting fact, however, that the boys who were fresh from school or indoor life, could endure more than the men of mature years who had at first laughed at them. On the first night of the march the men camped by the side of a stream. Supper was cooked with water taken from this stream and on the following morning a dead mule was found above the camp, it having been in the middle of th
x, the companies have acquired a proficiency in drill not surpassed by many older troops. Under charge of Major Howe, the important duties of the guard are well attended to. Other departments are in good hands, and a system of strict accountability is rigidly enforced. The other troops in the brigade were the Twentieth Massachusetts and the Seventh Michigan, Forty-Second New York (Tammany), Captain Saunders' Company of Sharpshooters (First Company of Massachusetts Sharpshooters) and Captain Vaughn's battery of Rhode Island Artillery. Small bunches of recruits were received from various sources while here, 43 being added from the 14th of September to the 27th. Shortly after the command was located at Camp Benton, six companies of the regiment, Companies A, B, C, D, E and F, were detailed, at various times, as pickets along the Potomac River, between Shelden's Island and Conrad's Ferry. Companies B, C, and E, were stationed below the crossing at Edward's Ferry,—D, above it, and, s
Edwin C. D. Saunders (search for this): chapter 3
cleanliness and order are strictly enforced. Under the superintendence of Lieut. Col. Devereux, the companies have acquired a proficiency in drill not surpassed by many older troops. Under charge of Major Howe, the important duties of the guard are well attended to. Other departments are in good hands, and a system of strict accountability is rigidly enforced. The other troops in the brigade were the Twentieth Massachusetts and the Seventh Michigan, Forty-Second New York (Tammany), Captain Saunders' Company of Sharpshooters (First Company of Massachusetts Sharpshooters) and Captain Vaughn's battery of Rhode Island Artillery. Small bunches of recruits were received from various sources while here, 43 being added from the 14th of September to the 27th. Shortly after the command was located at Camp Benton, six companies of the regiment, Companies A, B, C, D, E and F, were detailed, at various times, as pickets along the Potomac River, between Shelden's Island and Conrad's Ferry. C
Edmund Rice (search for this): chapter 3
section of two guns of Vaughn's Rhode Island Battery, posted there. They called the place Camp Straw. The work was very light and much freedom was enjoyed. The men improved the opportunity to have a change of rations by buying food from the farmers. An old colored mammy's squash and sweet potato pies were believed to be great luxuries by those who had never bought them. No one ever patronized her twice. The men of the six companies who were on picket duty were under command of Capt. Edmund Rice and lived in cozy little shanties which were very comfortable, except in heavy storms, when they were not quite as dry as the men might have wished. While at Camp Benton, dress coats, with brass shoulder scales and leather neck stocks, were issued, and, when not in line or on guard the spare moments of the men were spent in cleaning the brasses. The government pay of $13.00 per was hard earned. In addition to the usual camp guard, a detail from each regiment in the brigade was de
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