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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865. Search the whole document.

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March 23rd (search for this): chapter 36
hompson, in command of Co. K. Co. H.Capt. J. G. C. Dodge, on detached service at volunteer camp, Readville, Mass. Co. I.Capt. William A. Hill, on detached service in Massachusetts. First Lieut. J. G. B. Adams in command of company. Co. K.Captain Lysander J. Hume, absent. First Lieut. William R. Driver, on detached service, A. A. A. G. draft rendezvous, Grand Rapids, Mich. Loss: Colonel A. F. Devereux, discharged by resignation, March 4th, 1864. gain: Recruits from depot, March 23 to March 27,—26. As the time for opening the spring campaign approached the re-organization of the Army of the Potomac into three corps caused many changes in divisions and brigades. In the case of Gibbon's Division, which retained its number as Second Division, Second Corps,—the Third Brigade, of which the Nineteenth Massachusetts formed a part, was consolidated with the First, under General Alexander A. Webb, who had previously commanded the Second Brigade. And thus made up, the br
March 15th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 36
ieutenant Colonel Wass being on recruiting duty in Boston. To the honor of the regiment it should be mentioned that during the time it was on furlough in Massachusetts, no one of its members was under restraint by the civil authorities and the command reported in the field with every veteran originally furloughed. There were with it, also, a number of deserters who had been apprehended by the officers. The regiment re-assembled in the state camp at Wenham and at 2.30 P. M. on the 15th of March, 1864, under the command of Major Rice, took the cars for Boston,—without a man missing. Boston was reached at 3.45 P. M. and the men marched to the depot of the Boston and Providence Railroad where they again took the cars for the front. At Groton, Conn., they left the cars and embarked upon the boat for Jersey City. At Philadelphia a stop of 24 hours was made and again were the men subjects of that splendid charity of the sons and daughters of Philadelphia,—the old Cooper Shop. The sin
May 2nd, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 36
roficiency of the Nineteenth Massachusetts regiment in the manual of arms equalled. After the drill General Grant dined with General Gibbon, the division commander. The day had been perfect, but the parade ground was very rough. After these events the monotonous life of the camp was not broken until May 1, when orders were given to prepare to march. Five days rations were to be carried in the haversacks and ten days in the teams. Each man was to carry 60 rounds of ammunition. May 2, 1864. Tore our huts down and were ordered to build with only one log and cover with shelter tents. This afternoon we were visited by a terrible whirlwind. For a long time the air was so full of dust that we could not keep our eyes open and were compelled to go into our tents. After the whirlwind we had a heavy thunder shower. On the first of May the regiment numbered 350, with two field and ten line officers. During the month of April Captain Hume of Co. K. was on detached service in
March 4th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 36
ting in Massachusetts. First Lieut. John B. Thompson, in command of Co. K. Co. H.Capt. J. G. C. Dodge, on detached service at volunteer camp, Readville, Mass. Co. I.Capt. William A. Hill, on detached service in Massachusetts. First Lieut. J. G. B. Adams in command of company. Co. K.Captain Lysander J. Hume, absent. First Lieut. William R. Driver, on detached service, A. A. A. G. draft rendezvous, Grand Rapids, Mich. Loss: Colonel A. F. Devereux, discharged by resignation, March 4th, 1864. gain: Recruits from depot, March 23 to March 27,—26. As the time for opening the spring campaign approached the re-organization of the Army of the Potomac into three corps caused many changes in divisions and brigades. In the case of Gibbon's Division, which retained its number as Second Division, Second Corps,—the Third Brigade, of which the Nineteenth Massachusetts formed a part, was consolidated with the First, under General Alexander A. Webb, who had previously commanded
eux having resigned, in regular order, Lieut. Col. Wass, Major Rice and Capt. Moncena Dunn, were promoted, dating from February 2nd. Second Lieut. Wm. A. McGinnis was made First Lieutenant in Company K, vice Hill promoted Captain. The month of April was spent in perfecting the discipline of the regiment and preparing it for the sterner duties of the campaign Recruits to the number of 52 were received during the month, and Horace Hastings, musician in Co. E re-enlisted. The stern duties off dust that we could not keep our eyes open and were compelled to go into our tents. After the whirlwind we had a heavy thunder shower. On the first of May the regiment numbered 350, with two field and ten line officers. During the month of April Captain Hume of Co. K. was on detached service in Philadelphia. In response to the order to prepare to march, nearly every soldier wrote a letter home and also sent home such little money as he had on hand, through Captain Pearl, the sutler.
manual of arms equalled. After the drill General Grant dined with General Gibbon, the division commander. The day had been perfect, but the parade ground was very rough. After these events the monotonous life of the camp was not broken until May 1, when orders were given to prepare to march. Five days rations were to be carried in the haversacks and ten days in the teams. Each man was to carry 60 rounds of ammunition. May 2, 1864. Tore our huts down and were ordered to build with This afternoon we were visited by a terrible whirlwind. For a long time the air was so full of dust that we could not keep our eyes open and were compelled to go into our tents. After the whirlwind we had a heavy thunder shower. On the first of May the regiment numbered 350, with two field and ten line officers. During the month of April Captain Hume of Co. K. was on detached service in Philadelphia. In response to the order to prepare to march, nearly every soldier wrote a letter h
February 8th (search for this): chapter 36
bacco houses. Feb. 5, 1864. Left for Washington this forenoon and took the cars for Baltimore, arriving at night. Got supper and turned in. Feb. 6, 1864. Started for Philadelphia this morning, arriving a little before dark, got supper and rested awhile, then started for New York, riding all night. Feb. 7, 1864. Arrived in New York at 6 o'clock in the morning. Left at 6 P. M. for Boston. The journey to Boston was made without incident. The regiment arrived at 4 A. M. on February 8th, and breakfast was served in the Beach Street barracks. At 11 o'clock line was formed and the regiment marched to Fanueil Hall Square, through crowds of people which filled all the streets, giving the men hardly space in which to walk. When the men were conducted into the hall a sight greeted them which at once put them into the best of humor. Their poor breakfast was forgotten as the tables at which they halted were loaded with good things. The escort of the regiment were the Home Gu
February 4th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 36
the train was ready and the regiment started. Box cars were furnished for the men and they let themselves out,—dancing, singing and shouting until they were hoarse. The officers who returned with the regiment to Boston were: Colonel Devereux. Lieut. Col. Wass. Major Edmund Rice. Acting Adjt. William M. Curtis. Quartermaster Thos. F. Winthrop. Surgeon J. F. Dyer. Asst. Surgeon C. P. Pratt. Capt. Moncena Dunn. Capt. Wm. L. Palmer. Capt. D. C. Mumford. Capt. L. J. Hume. Feb. 4, 1864. Started for home at 2.30 o'clock. Arrived at Alexandria, Va., at 9 o'clock. Had supper and turned in in one of the old tobacco houses. Feb. 5, 1864. Left for Washington this forenoon and took the cars for Baltimore, arriving at night. Got supper and turned in. Feb. 6, 1864. Started for Philadelphia this morning, arriving a little before dark, got supper and rested awhile, then started for New York, riding all night. Feb. 7, 1864. Arrived in New York at 6 o'clock in the mor
February 3rd (search for this): chapter 36
Chapter 36: return of the regiment to Massachusetts. Back again to the front. On February 3 the order to prepare for the journey home was received and on the following day, when they broke camp it was a jolly occasion for every one. The two miles between the camp and the depot was quickly covered and no one fell out. Those of the Nineteenth regiment who did not or could not re-enlist were turned over to the Twentieth Massachusetts for duty during the absence of the regiment. At the depot the usual delay incident to army railroading occurred, but finally the train was ready and the regiment started. Box cars were furnished for the men and they let themselves out,—dancing, singing and shouting until they were hoarse. The officers who returned with the regiment to Boston were: Colonel Devereux. Lieut. Col. Wass. Major Edmund Rice. Acting Adjt. William M. Curtis. Quartermaster Thos. F. Winthrop. Surgeon J. F. Dyer. Asst. Surgeon C. P. Pratt. Capt. Moncena Dunn. Ca
February 5th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 36
were hoarse. The officers who returned with the regiment to Boston were: Colonel Devereux. Lieut. Col. Wass. Major Edmund Rice. Acting Adjt. William M. Curtis. Quartermaster Thos. F. Winthrop. Surgeon J. F. Dyer. Asst. Surgeon C. P. Pratt. Capt. Moncena Dunn. Capt. Wm. L. Palmer. Capt. D. C. Mumford. Capt. L. J. Hume. Feb. 4, 1864. Started for home at 2.30 o'clock. Arrived at Alexandria, Va., at 9 o'clock. Had supper and turned in in one of the old tobacco houses. Feb. 5, 1864. Left for Washington this forenoon and took the cars for Baltimore, arriving at night. Got supper and turned in. Feb. 6, 1864. Started for Philadelphia this morning, arriving a little before dark, got supper and rested awhile, then started for New York, riding all night. Feb. 7, 1864. Arrived in New York at 6 o'clock in the morning. Left at 6 P. M. for Boston. The journey to Boston was made without incident. The regiment arrived at 4 A. M. on February 8th, and breakfast w
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