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the heat intense. They bore up manfully, although they had been without sleep for three nights, and many without food. At noon on June 2 the regiment arrived at Cold Harbor and the men again moved out as skirmishers under fire of the enemy, but suffered no loss. At night the brigade was massed in a hollow a short distance to the left of the works and turned in for the night. Everyone expected hard work on the morrow and none was disappointed. Just after midnight on the morning of the 3d, the men were awakened and given two day's rations of hardtack, coffee and sugar and were then permitted to sleep until daylight. Then they formed for the charge upon the enemy's lines and, after waiting three hours for the order, started on the double-quick,— and met the fate of all portions of the Union Army,—heavy loss and nothing gained. On they ran, over two lines of works, across the fields which were swept by a terrible fire of canister from the enemy's batteries, while the musketry
firing. The videttes of the regiment in front were connected with another line of works during the day. The men were then within speaking distance of the rebels and there was much conversation between them. Firing began on the left during the evening and the enemy evidently believed that an attack was to be made on their centre for they opened with musketry all along the line, keeping it up for some time. The Union battery opened up on them eventually and compelled them to stop. On the 7th a truce was entered into for the purpose of burying the dead, killed in the charge of four days previous. Firing ceased and both Yanks and Rebs met, shook hands, exchanged papers, tobacco, coffee, sugar, etc. The evening and night were spent quietly and on the following day the regiment received 11 recruits. The truce was kept up until the morning of the 9th, when firing was resumed with spirit, the regiment losing six men wounded. On the 10th it lost two men by the enemy's sharpshooters
l along the line, keeping it up for some time. The Union battery opened up on them eventually and compelled them to stop. On the 7th a truce was entered into for the purpose of burying the dead, killed in the charge of four days previous. Firing ceased and both Yanks and Rebs met, shook hands, exchanged papers, tobacco, coffee, sugar, etc. The evening and night were spent quietly and on the following day the regiment received 11 recruits. The truce was kept up until the morning of the 9th, when firing was resumed with spirit, the regiment losing six men wounded. On the 10th it lost two men by the enemy's sharpshooters. On the 11th the regiment kept up a galling and continuous fire on the enemy who were unable to return it. During the day about 100 recruits joined the regiment and were placed in the rear line under charge of Lieut. McGinnis. For the next few days he had a circus with his Army of all Nations, as they were dubbed, for not half of them could speak or unders
ntually and compelled them to stop. On the 7th a truce was entered into for the purpose of burying the dead, killed in the charge of four days previous. Firing ceased and both Yanks and Rebs met, shook hands, exchanged papers, tobacco, coffee, sugar, etc. The evening and night were spent quietly and on the following day the regiment received 11 recruits. The truce was kept up until the morning of the 9th, when firing was resumed with spirit, the regiment losing six men wounded. On the 10th it lost two men by the enemy's sharpshooters. On the 11th the regiment kept up a galling and continuous fire on the enemy who were unable to return it. During the day about 100 recruits joined the regiment and were placed in the rear line under charge of Lieut. McGinnis. For the next few days he had a circus with his Army of all Nations, as they were dubbed, for not half of them could speak or understand the English language, and Lieut. McGinnis had to use a form of kindergarten system
as entered into for the purpose of burying the dead, killed in the charge of four days previous. Firing ceased and both Yanks and Rebs met, shook hands, exchanged papers, tobacco, coffee, sugar, etc. The evening and night were spent quietly and on the following day the regiment received 11 recruits. The truce was kept up until the morning of the 9th, when firing was resumed with spirit, the regiment losing six men wounded. On the 10th it lost two men by the enemy's sharpshooters. On the 11th the regiment kept up a galling and continuous fire on the enemy who were unable to return it. During the day about 100 recruits joined the regiment and were placed in the rear line under charge of Lieut. McGinnis. For the next few days he had a circus with his Army of all Nations, as they were dubbed, for not half of them could speak or understand the English language, and Lieut. McGinnis had to use a form of kindergarten system in teaching them the manual. He would go through the motio
en left in the field hospital outside the lines. This being safely performed, the regiment returned to the bivouac of the previous night, and remained in quietness until 10 P. M. of the 17th, when it occupied the works taken from the enemy on the 12th. At daylight of the 18th, the regiment participated in a charge against a point in a right oblique direction at Ice Grove. This has sometimes been called the Second Spottsylvania battle. The Rebels again hastily retreated, but, owing to the cof kindergarten system in teaching them the manual. He would go through the motions and they would follow. Soon they were assigned to the different companies and, for a short time, were a source of amusement to the veterans. At 9 P. M. of the 12th, the regiment moved slowly out of the works but soon quickened the pace and advanced rapidly toward the Chickahominy and crossed at 3 P. M. and then marched rapidly until midnight and halted, having marched 25 miles in 27 hours. The Nineteenth act
uld go through the motions and they would follow. Soon they were assigned to the different companies and, for a short time, were a source of amusement to the veterans. At 9 P. M. of the 12th, the regiment moved slowly out of the works but soon quickened the pace and advanced rapidly toward the Chickahominy and crossed at 3 P. M. and then marched rapidly until midnight and halted, having marched 25 miles in 27 hours. The Nineteenth acted as rear guard during the march. At 7 A. M. of the 14th, they resumed the march with the Corps and moved about two miles, which brought the regiment in the vicinity of the James. At 4 P. M. they proceeded, and crossed the James in a steamer at 6 P. M., and, after marching a mile and a half, rested for the night. At 11 A. M. of the 15th, the march was resumed and continued until 12 P. M., going over some 25 miles. This brought them to the first line of the enemy's works before Petersburg, which had been taken by the colored troops under Genera
dly toward the Chickahominy and crossed at 3 P. M. and then marched rapidly until midnight and halted, having marched 25 miles in 27 hours. The Nineteenth acted as rear guard during the march. At 7 A. M. of the 14th, they resumed the march with the Corps and moved about two miles, which brought the regiment in the vicinity of the James. At 4 P. M. they proceeded, and crossed the James in a steamer at 6 P. M., and, after marching a mile and a half, rested for the night. At 11 A. M. of the 15th, the march was resumed and continued until 12 P. M., going over some 25 miles. This brought them to the first line of the enemy's works before Petersburg, which had been taken by the colored troops under General Hinks and the Eighteenth Army Corps. Here they rested for the night. At sundown of the following day they engaged the enemy for about two hours. At 6 P. M. of the 17th, the regiment charged the works, with no casualties, but were eventually repulsed. During the day Generals Gran
ance train, which went out to bring in the wounded who had been left in the field hospital outside the lines. This being safely performed, the regiment returned to the bivouac of the previous night, and remained in quietness until 10 P. M. of the 17th, when it occupied the works taken from the enemy on the 12th. At daylight of the 18th, the regiment participated in a charge against a point in a right oblique direction at Ice Grove. This has sometimes been called the Second Spottsylvania bat works before Petersburg, which had been taken by the colored troops under General Hinks and the Eighteenth Army Corps. Here they rested for the night. At sundown of the following day they engaged the enemy for about two hours. At 6 P. M. of the 17th, the regiment charged the works, with no casualties, but were eventually repulsed. During the day Generals Grant, Hancock and Gibbon rode along the line. List of men of the Nineteenth Massachusetts regiment, killed in action or died of wounds,
er with the rest of the brigade, rested for the night. On the following day the regiment moved two miles to the right, to protect the passage of the corps ambulance train, which went out to bring in the wounded who had been left in the field hospital outside the lines. This being safely performed, the regiment returned to the bivouac of the previous night, and remained in quietness until 10 P. M. of the 17th, when it occupied the works taken from the enemy on the 12th. At daylight of the 18th, the regiment participated in a charge against a point in a right oblique direction at Ice Grove. This has sometimes been called the Second Spottsylvania battle. The Rebels again hastily retreated, but, owing to the concentrated fire of the enemy's artillery, the regiment fell back with several killed and wounded. The command halted and rested until 9 P. M. when it was moved to the left some four or five miles, marching until 12.20, when a halt was made and the men rested quietly for tha
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