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Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
mes been called the Second Spottsylvania battle. The Rebels again hastily retreated, but, owing to the concentrated fire of the enemy's artillery, the regiment fell back with several killed and wounded. The command halted and rested until 9 P. M. when it was moved to the left some four or five miles, marching until 12.20, when a halt was made and the men rested quietly for that night and the following day. May 20, 1864. One of the deserters who had returned with the regiment from Massachusetts was shot this morning for desertion of the colors in the face of the enemy at Laurel Hill. He deserted from our regiment about two years since, joined another, getting a bounty for so doing, and in a short time joined still another getting another bounty,—all of which was taken into consideration. He was pardoned by the president, but on account of his late desertion of the colors, suffered the penalty of death. On the 20th, quiet reigned, but at 11 P. M. the order to march brought
Bowling Green (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
which was taken into consideration. He was pardoned by the president, but on account of his late desertion of the colors, suffered the penalty of death. On the 20th, quiet reigned, but at 11 P. M. the order to march brought the regiment again on the move, the Second Corps leading the advance of the Army still further to the left. The course lay down the line of the Richmond and Fredericksburg Railroad. The men marched well, having been refreshed by the recent showers and rest. Bowling Green and Milford were reached on the 21st and the column crossed the Mattapony. Here the regiment was ordered out on picket duty, where it remained until dark, the men exchanging fire with the enemy's pickets. Then they rejoined the brigade which lay behind the breastworks and rested for the balance of the night. May 21st, 1864. At Milford Station our cavalry had a fight with the enemy, capturing about fifty prisoners. My feet are pretty sore and I am pretty tired. Our regiment was sen
Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
orps ambulance train, which went out to bring in the wounded who had been left in the field hospital outside the lines. This being safely performed, the regiment returned to the bivouac of the previous night, and remained in quietness until 10 P. M. of the 17th, when it occupied the works taken from the enemy on the 12th. At daylight of the 18th, the regiment participated in a charge against a point in a right oblique direction at Ice Grove. This has sometimes been called the Second Spottsylvania battle. The Rebels again hastily retreated, but, owing to the concentrated fire of the enemy's artillery, the regiment fell back with several killed and wounded. The command halted and rested until 9 P. M. when it was moved to the left some four or five miles, marching until 12.20, when a halt was made and the men rested quietly for that night and the following day. May 20, 1864. One of the deserters who had returned with the regiment from Massachusetts was shot this morning for
Pamunkey (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
rook at the rear, having lost four killed and several wounded during the day, while nine were prostrated by the intense heat. The regiment was on picket on May 25 until 5 P. M. and was again detailed for the same duty on the right at 9 P. M. It was relieved at 11 P. M. on the 26th and re-crossed the North Anna and rested behind the works on the north bank of the river. On the 27th the regiment left these works, under a fire of shells from the enemy, and moved in the direction of the Pamunky river. The men were feeling in good spirits during this march and were continually singing snatches of songs and joking. At 11 P. M. the line halted and the men rested for the balance of the night. On the following morning, at 6 A. M., the march was resumed at a brisk pace. The Pamunky was crossed and the men threw up a line of works upon a ridge of hills, remaining there for the night. The 29th of May was remarkably free from firing in the front and the best part of the day was consume
Lynnfield (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
the morning of the 31st the skirmish line was advanced and the rebels were driven from pit to pit until they got behind their main works where they made a stand. They set fire to the woods and this communicating to some of the rifle pits which men of the Nineteenth were occupying, forced them out. There was sharp firing all day. Captain Dudley C. Mumford, of Co. G, was killed by a ball through the head during a charge. He was a noble fellow and loved by all. He joined the regiment at Lynnfield, a young boy just out of school, had been promoted from Second Lieutenant to Captain and had shared every march and battle in which the regiment had been engaged. When relieved, the regiment still held the captured works and, during the night, threw up a strong breastwork. The position at this time was about three miles from the Chickahominy river. On June 1 the regiment was engaged as a skirmishing line and exposed (although without much injury) to the enemy's shells, but the desp
Milford, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
into consideration. He was pardoned by the president, but on account of his late desertion of the colors, suffered the penalty of death. On the 20th, quiet reigned, but at 11 P. M. the order to march brought the regiment again on the move, the Second Corps leading the advance of the Army still further to the left. The course lay down the line of the Richmond and Fredericksburg Railroad. The men marched well, having been refreshed by the recent showers and rest. Bowling Green and Milford were reached on the 21st and the column crossed the Mattapony. Here the regiment was ordered out on picket duty, where it remained until dark, the men exchanging fire with the enemy's pickets. Then they rejoined the brigade which lay behind the breastworks and rested for the balance of the night. May 21st, 1864. At Milford Station our cavalry had a fight with the enemy, capturing about fifty prisoners. My feet are pretty sore and I am pretty tired. Our regiment was sent out on picket
North Anna (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
e night. May 21st, 1864. At Milford Station our cavalry had a fight with the enemy, capturing about fifty prisoners. My feet are pretty sore and I am pretty tired. Our regiment was sent out on picket this afternoon. At about dark the rebel cavalry made a dash on our pickets, but were repulsed. At 7.30 A. M. of the 23d, the men resumed their march, advancing at a rapid rate all day. At dark the artillery and the skirmishers became engaged with the enemy on the north bank of the North Anna river. The regiment remained massed with the brigade all night, having previously moved to the front and thrown up breastworks. The regiment crossed the river during the forenoon of May 24th without opposition and, after lying in line of battle during the middle of the day, was ordered out as a skirmish line at the left of the Fourteenth Connecticut regiment. Moving by the left flank for some distance, the men advanced immediately through the grounds of the Dawson Mansion, crossing an open
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
, May 3 to June 11, 1864. Killed: May 6th.Corp. George W. Cain, Co. B. Priv. Thomas F. Costello, Co. G. Priv. Redford Dawes, Co. G. Priv. Bernard Dame, Co. G. May 10th.Priv. Charles Smith, Co. A. Priv. George E. Breed, Co. C. (Shell wound in head, Priv. Horatio Fellows, Co. C. died May 13th, 1864.) Priv. John A. Clark, Co. E. Sergt. William H. Ross, Co. H. May 12th.First Lieut. John J. Ferris. Color Sergt. Benj. F. Falls, Co. A. (Died May 14, 1864, buried at Fredericksburg.) Priv. Patrick Cronin, Co. B, right elbow fractured (Died May 13th, 1864.) First Sergt. Charles B. Brown, Co. G. (Both thighs, shell,—May 14th, 1864.) Corp. Archibald Buchanan, Co. K. (Died of wounds in general hosp., right knee, leg amputated.) Priv. Benjamin McDonald, Co. A, abdomen and hips. (Died of wounds.) May 24th. First Sergt. Samuel E. Viall, Co. E. (Died of wounds.) May 31st.Captain Dudley C. Mumford. June 3rd.First Lieut. John B. Thompson. Priv. Francis McAlpi
Chickahominy (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
y C. Mumford, of Co. G, was killed by a ball through the head during a charge. He was a noble fellow and loved by all. He joined the regiment at Lynnfield, a young boy just out of school, had been promoted from Second Lieutenant to Captain and had shared every march and battle in which the regiment had been engaged. When relieved, the regiment still held the captured works and, during the night, threw up a strong breastwork. The position at this time was about three miles from the Chickahominy river. On June 1 the regiment was engaged as a skirmishing line and exposed (although without much injury) to the enemy's shells, but the desperate struggle at Cold Harbor had opened and at dusk Gen. Hancock began to withdraw his corps at the left of the lines. At 9 P. M. the men were called in and marched, during the night, about 12 miles, the road being very dusty and the heat intense. They bore up manfully, although they had been without sleep for three nights, and many without fo
Stevensburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
ad been taken by the colored troops under General Hinks and the Eighteenth Army Corps. Here they rested for the night. At sundown of the following day they engaged the enemy for about two hours. At 6 P. M. of the 17th, the regiment charged the works, with no casualties, but were eventually repulsed. During the day Generals Grant, Hancock and Gibbon rode along the line. List of men of the Nineteenth Massachusetts regiment, killed in action or died of wounds, since leaving its camp at Stevensburg, May 3 to June 11, 1864. Killed: May 6th.Corp. George W. Cain, Co. B. Priv. Thomas F. Costello, Co. G. Priv. Redford Dawes, Co. G. Priv. Bernard Dame, Co. G. May 10th.Priv. Charles Smith, Co. A. Priv. George E. Breed, Co. C. (Shell wound in head, Priv. Horatio Fellows, Co. C. died May 13th, 1864.) Priv. John A. Clark, Co. E. Sergt. William H. Ross, Co. H. May 12th.First Lieut. John J. Ferris. Color Sergt. Benj. F. Falls, Co. A. (Died May 14, 1864, buried at F
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