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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865. Search the whole document.

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Isaac H. Boyd (search for this): chapter 6
er the return of the command to Camp Benton from Ball's Bluff, a reorganization of the regiment took place. Capt. Moses Stanwood, of Co. A., Lieutenants C. C. Sampson of Co. I. and Eugene Kelty of Company K resigned, and were discharged in October, and in November Capt. William H. Wilson and Second Lieut. William H. LeCain of Co. H., with First Lieut. S. D. Hovey of Co. G. were honorably discharged. First Lieut. Charles M. Merritt was promoted to be Captain of Company A, and Second Lieut. Isaac H. Boyd was commissioned First Lieutenant in that Company. In Company D, Sergeant Major Samuel Baxter was made Second Lieutenant, Second Lieutenant John P. Reynolds was made First Lieutenant and Acting Adjutant and transferred from Company D to G. In Co. K. Second Lieut. Edward P. Bishop was promoted to First Lieutenant, and First Sergeant Lysander Hume was advanced to Second Lieutenant. First Lieut. Henry A. Hale of Co. H. was transferred to Co. I, while bandmaster John A. Spo
Charles U. Devereux (search for this): chapter 6
n Company H being distributed among the others. A new company was then authorized to be raised in Essex county by Charles U. Devereux, the former First Sergeant of the Salem Zouaves and brother of Lieut. Col. Devereux. This company arrived at MuLieut. Col. Devereux. This company arrived at Muddy Branch on December 13, 1861, bringing with it 125 men. Its complement was but 101, and all over this number were sent to the other companies as recruits. This brought the membership of the regiment up to 939 men. In the new company were many members of the Salem Zouaves who had served through the Three Months Campaign. Beside Capt. Devereux were First Lieutenant Albert Thorndike, First Sergt. Wm. R. Driver, Sergeants Albert C. Douglas, George B. Symonds and Samuel H. Smith and Corp. A. lounged on the bed, played cards, studied and discussed the Tactics and Regulations, jawed and spat in the fire. Lieut. Col. Devereux and others of the old company were frequent visitors. On December 20 recruits to the number of 117 arrived amon
Albert Thorndike (search for this): chapter 6
U. Devereux, the former First Sergeant of the Salem Zouaves and brother of Lieut. Col. Devereux. This company arrived at Muddy Branch on December 13, 1861, bringing with it 125 men. Its complement was but 101, and all over this number were sent to the other companies as recruits. This brought the membership of the regiment up to 939 men. In the new company were many members of the Salem Zouaves who had served through the Three Months Campaign. Beside Capt. Devereux were First Lieutenant Albert Thorndike, First Sergt. Wm. R. Driver, Sergeants Albert C. Douglas, George B. Symonds and Samuel H. Smith and Corp. A. Frank Hutchings. This company was at once mustered into service as the new Company H, and given the nickname of The Lapstone Light Infantry. A family reunion of the Salem Zouaves naturally followed. Tents were issued to the new company, and everybody turned their attention to making themselves comfortable. Stockades were built about the tent, with fire-places and
John P. Reynolds (search for this): chapter 6
nd Lieut. Isaac H. Boyd was commissioned First Lieutenant in that Company. In Company D, Sergeant Major Samuel Baxter was made Second Lieutenant, Second Lieutenant John P. Reynolds was made First Lieutenant and Acting Adjutant and transferred from Company D to G. In Co. K. Second Lieut. Edward P. Bishop was promoted to Firstld ignite the quickmatch and the signal would be fired like a bengola light. The first signal issued to the Nineteenth regiment is now in the possession of Capt. Reynolds. These signals were in vogue before the organization of the signal corps, which afterward became a separate, distinct and efficient branch of the service and112, made by motions of the flag. The night challenge is Red-White, the reply being White. ( This signal, not being used, became void, and is preserved by Captain Reynolds among his war souvenirs.) These colors designated by the outer wrapper on the signal cartridge, correspond with the instructions in the little folded cocked
Lewis Rimback (search for this): chapter 6
Second Lieutenant, Second Lieutenant John P. Reynolds was made First Lieutenant and Acting Adjutant and transferred from Company D to G. In Co. K. Second Lieut. Edward P. Bishop was promoted to First Lieutenant, and First Sergeant Lysander Hume was advanced to Second Lieutenant. First Lieut. Henry A. Hale of Co. H. was transferred to Co. I, while bandmaster John A. Spofford, with musicians R. W. Stevens, W. C. M. Howe, E. F. Spofford and J. M. Hine resigned and were discharged. Lewis Rimback, of Boston, was appointed as the new bandmaster. Instead of staying all winter in Camp Benton as had been expected, the regiment was ordered, on December 4, 1861, to Seneca, at a place called Muddy Branch, some miles nearer Washington, where it relieved some of the command of Gen. Banks, whose division was sent to Frederick. Camp Benton, with its well determined lines, its spacious streets, curiously constructed ovens and underground furnaces, its nicely thatched stables and log ho
Henry A. Hale (search for this): chapter 6
. Charles M. Merritt was promoted to be Captain of Company A, and Second Lieut. Isaac H. Boyd was commissioned First Lieutenant in that Company. In Company D, Sergeant Major Samuel Baxter was made Second Lieutenant, Second Lieutenant John P. Reynolds was made First Lieutenant and Acting Adjutant and transferred from Company D to G. In Co. K. Second Lieut. Edward P. Bishop was promoted to First Lieutenant, and First Sergeant Lysander Hume was advanced to Second Lieutenant. First Lieut. Henry A. Hale of Co. H. was transferred to Co. I, while bandmaster John A. Spofford, with musicians R. W. Stevens, W. C. M. Howe, E. F. Spofford and J. M. Hine resigned and were discharged. Lewis Rimback, of Boston, was appointed as the new bandmaster. Instead of staying all winter in Camp Benton as had been expected, the regiment was ordered, on December 4, 1861, to Seneca, at a place called Muddy Branch, some miles nearer Washington, where it relieved some of the command of Gen. Banks, wh
George B. Symonds (search for this): chapter 6
. Devereux. This company arrived at Muddy Branch on December 13, 1861, bringing with it 125 men. Its complement was but 101, and all over this number were sent to the other companies as recruits. This brought the membership of the regiment up to 939 men. In the new company were many members of the Salem Zouaves who had served through the Three Months Campaign. Beside Capt. Devereux were First Lieutenant Albert Thorndike, First Sergt. Wm. R. Driver, Sergeants Albert C. Douglas, George B. Symonds and Samuel H. Smith and Corp. A. Frank Hutchings. This company was at once mustered into service as the new Company H, and given the nickname of The Lapstone Light Infantry. A family reunion of the Salem Zouaves naturally followed. Tents were issued to the new company, and everybody turned their attention to making themselves comfortable. Stockades were built about the tent, with fire-places and such other conveniences as the experience of those who had been longer domiciled coul
w bandmaster. Instead of staying all winter in Camp Benton as had been expected, the regiment was ordered, on December 4, 1861, to Seneca, at a place called Muddy Branch, some miles nearer Washington, where it relieved some of the command of Gen. Banks, whose division was sent to Frederick. Camp Benton, with its well determined lines, its spacious streets, curiously constructed ovens and underground furnaces, its nicely thatched stables and log houses, was left as a monument to the versaty one report was ever received. That was All Right. In about two weeks this company was ordered to join the regiment at Camp Lander, near Muddy Branch. Their first work was the procuring of logs from the camps that had just been abandoned by Gen. Banks' Division. The men built these up for about three feet from the ground, stopping the the cracks between them with small sticks and mud. The soil contained much clay and made good mortar. On the top of the logs the tent was made fast and fire
Levi Woofindale (search for this): chapter 6
protect the ford and lock at Whitehouse on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. Long after the regiment left this vicinity, these blockhouses played a conspicuous part in preventing raids across the river. As two towns, Rockville and Darnestown, required a provost guard, Company A, Capt. Merritt, was given the duty. In addition the camp and stores of the regiment demanded a quarter guard. A bakery for the regiment was erected and flour instead of stale bread, was drawn from Poolesville, Levi Woofindale, of Company G, being appointed regimental baker The headquarters of the regiment were located in an old wooden building and here also were the quarters of the Adjutant, Quartermaster and Surgeon. Tents scattered about the building were used for the non-commissioned staff and men detailed at headquarters. The balance of the regiment were housed in tents. Guard mounting took place each morning. The band was still with the regiment, and the players had a hard time in keeping their f
R. W. Stevens (search for this): chapter 6
ed First Lieutenant in that Company. In Company D, Sergeant Major Samuel Baxter was made Second Lieutenant, Second Lieutenant John P. Reynolds was made First Lieutenant and Acting Adjutant and transferred from Company D to G. In Co. K. Second Lieut. Edward P. Bishop was promoted to First Lieutenant, and First Sergeant Lysander Hume was advanced to Second Lieutenant. First Lieut. Henry A. Hale of Co. H. was transferred to Co. I, while bandmaster John A. Spofford, with musicians R. W. Stevens, W. C. M. Howe, E. F. Spofford and J. M. Hine resigned and were discharged. Lewis Rimback, of Boston, was appointed as the new bandmaster. Instead of staying all winter in Camp Benton as had been expected, the regiment was ordered, on December 4, 1861, to Seneca, at a place called Muddy Branch, some miles nearer Washington, where it relieved some of the command of Gen. Banks, whose division was sent to Frederick. Camp Benton, with its well determined lines, its spacious streets, c
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