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Horatio G. Wright (search for this): chapter 20
the brigade. Approved, by General Wheaton, commanding the division, I think it greatly for the interest of the division that the 121st New York Regiment be filled. Its services have been most marked and conspicuous, not surpassed by any regiment I can name, and its gallant commander is entitled by continuous and valuable services to be mustered as Colonel, he having held the commission for more than a year, and has frequently commanded a brigade in battle, and with great credit. By Gen. H. G. Wright, commanding the corps, Respectfully forwarded, with urgent request that recruits or drafted men sufficient to fill up this regiment be promptly assigned to it. And I hereby endorse all that has been said by Generals McKenzie and Wheaton in regard to the services and standing of the regiment, and the merits of its commander. General Meade forwarded it to Washington with this endorsement: It is especially requested that this regiment may be specially designated to be filled up by assign
Philip R. Woodcock (search for this): chapter 20
e ordered to be sent to the 121st; but they did not arrive until after the surrender of Lee, and while the corps was at Burksville Junction. Then the officers were duly mustered. During the winter also changes were made in the field and staff, by appointment and promotion. Dr. James P. Kimball was commissioned Assistant Surgeon. Vice Dr. Holt resigned. Frank E. Lowe was promoted to be Adjutant, Sergeant Major J. L. Morthon, Sergeant Newber, N. A. Armstrong, Thomas J. Hassett and Philip R. Woodcock were promoted to lieutenants. Morris C. Foote, of Cooperstown was also commissioned as lieutenant. Lieut. E. C. Weaver resigned on account of sickness and Lieutenant Kelly died of disease. The ordinary duties of camp life, drills, picket and fatigue, in trenches and forts, was broken once when in February 5th to 8th the brigade was sent to support the 5th Corps on an expedition to Hatcher's Run. At one time the line of the 5th Corps was broken and some of the troops fell back in
till deficient in numbers. Application was then made to the Secretary of War for the assignment of four hundred recruits to the regiment. This application was endorsed as follows: By General McKenzie, commanding the brigade. Approved, by General Wheaton, commanding the division, I think it greatly for the interest of the division that the 121st New York Regiment be filled. Its services have been most marked and conspicuous, not surpassed by any regiment I can name, and its gallant commandeen. H. G. Wright, commanding the corps, Respectfully forwarded, with urgent request that recruits or drafted men sufficient to fill up this regiment be promptly assigned to it. And I hereby endorse all that has been said by Generals McKenzie and Wheaton in regard to the services and standing of the regiment, and the merits of its commander. General Meade forwarded it to Washington with this endorsement: It is especially requested that this regiment may be specially designated to be filled up b
E. C. Weaver (search for this): chapter 20
urksville Junction. Then the officers were duly mustered. During the winter also changes were made in the field and staff, by appointment and promotion. Dr. James P. Kimball was commissioned Assistant Surgeon. Vice Dr. Holt resigned. Frank E. Lowe was promoted to be Adjutant, Sergeant Major J. L. Morthon, Sergeant Newber, N. A. Armstrong, Thomas J. Hassett and Philip R. Woodcock were promoted to lieutenants. Morris C. Foote, of Cooperstown was also commissioned as lieutenant. Lieut. E. C. Weaver resigned on account of sickness and Lieutenant Kelly died of disease. The ordinary duties of camp life, drills, picket and fatigue, in trenches and forts, was broken once when in February 5th to 8th the brigade was sent to support the 5th Corps on an expedition to Hatcher's Run. At one time the line of the 5th Corps was broken and some of the troops fell back in confusion. The brigade restored and stiffened the line and became lightly engaged. It crossed the Run to the front twi
Washington (search for this): chapter 20
held the commission for more than a year, and has frequently commanded a brigade in battle, and with great credit. By Gen. H. G. Wright, commanding the corps, Respectfully forwarded, with urgent request that recruits or drafted men sufficient to fill up this regiment be promptly assigned to it. And I hereby endorse all that has been said by Generals McKenzie and Wheaton in regard to the services and standing of the regiment, and the merits of its commander. General Meade forwarded it to Washington with this endorsement: It is especially requested that this regiment may be specially designated to be filled up by assignment of men to its ranks, in consideration of its gallant reputation, and the distinguished services of its commander. This application, thus endorsed received consideration by the War Department, and four hundred additions were ordered to be sent to the 121st; but they did not arrive until after the surrender of Lee, and while the corps was at Burksville Junction. Th
Otsego (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
naged to prolong to the 14th of March. During the winter an effort was made to fill up the regiment so that the officers who had been commissioned, but could not be mustered in, because the number of enlisted men was below the required standard, might receive their full rank. These were Lieutenant Colonel Olcott, Captain Cronkite and Captain Kidder, who had been commissioned respectively Colonel, Lieutenant Colonel and Major. Several recruiting officers were sent home to Herkimer and Otsego Counties to obtain recruits, but their efforts did not avail to fill the regiment and the 1st of March found the regiment still deficient in numbers. Application was then made to the Secretary of War for the assignment of four hundred recruits to the regiment. This application was endorsed as follows: By General McKenzie, commanding the brigade. Approved, by General Wheaton, commanding the division, I think it greatly for the interest of the division that the 121st New York Regiment be fille
Cooperstown (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
ter the surrender of Lee, and while the corps was at Burksville Junction. Then the officers were duly mustered. During the winter also changes were made in the field and staff, by appointment and promotion. Dr. James P. Kimball was commissioned Assistant Surgeon. Vice Dr. Holt resigned. Frank E. Lowe was promoted to be Adjutant, Sergeant Major J. L. Morthon, Sergeant Newber, N. A. Armstrong, Thomas J. Hassett and Philip R. Woodcock were promoted to lieutenants. Morris C. Foote, of Cooperstown was also commissioned as lieutenant. Lieut. E. C. Weaver resigned on account of sickness and Lieutenant Kelly died of disease. The ordinary duties of camp life, drills, picket and fatigue, in trenches and forts, was broken once when in February 5th to 8th the brigade was sent to support the 5th Corps on an expedition to Hatcher's Run. At one time the line of the 5th Corps was broken and some of the troops fell back in confusion. The brigade restored and stiffened the line and became
City Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
Petersburg Hatcher's Run the attack on Ft. Steadman a successful charge The corps remained in the camp near Middletown until November 9th, the men doing only picket and guard duty. Then it retired to Kernstown where a slight skirmish with the enemy occurred on the morning of the 10th. Picket and guard duty continued until the 1st of December, when the corps broke camp and marching to Stevenson's Station entrained for Washington. The next day it embarked on steamers and arrived at City Point on the 4th. There cars were taken to Parke's Station. Here the railroad was left and the corps or a portion of it, relieved the 3d Division of the 5th Corps, and occupied their finely laid out, and well constructed winter quarters near the Jerusalem plank road, the position we had left five months before. The regiment now numbered not far from 175 men and was commanded by Colonel Olcott. On the 9th of December a reconnaisance was made to the vicinity of Hatcher's Run. Rain and then sn
Herkimer (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
pril, which he managed to prolong to the 14th of March. During the winter an effort was made to fill up the regiment so that the officers who had been commissioned, but could not be mustered in, because the number of enlisted men was below the required standard, might receive their full rank. These were Lieutenant Colonel Olcott, Captain Cronkite and Captain Kidder, who had been commissioned respectively Colonel, Lieutenant Colonel and Major. Several recruiting officers were sent home to Herkimer and Otsego Counties to obtain recruits, but their efforts did not avail to fill the regiment and the 1st of March found the regiment still deficient in numbers. Application was then made to the Secretary of War for the assignment of four hundred recruits to the regiment. This application was endorsed as follows: By General McKenzie, commanding the brigade. Approved, by General Wheaton, commanding the division, I think it greatly for the interest of the division that the 121st New York R
S. H. Sherman (search for this): chapter 20
a log of cord wood all night, and extra picket duty somewhat cancelled the pleasant remembrance of it. Major Cronkite then in command of the regiment, did not escape denunciation by the transgressors. General Grant says in his memoirs that at this time he was in great anxiety lest Lee should leave his, position protecting Petersburg and Richmond, and leaving only a thin line for the purpose of deception send or take the greater part of his army to the assistance of Johnston and overwhelm Sherman in his advance through the Carolinas. If he should do this before the roads became passable for artillery and trains, a great disaster to the Union cause might result. But General Lee determined to make one more desperate effort to break the vice-like grip that the Union army had on Petersburg; and so directed General Gordon with a chosen force to attack, and if possible break through the besieging forces at Fort Steadman. This attempt was made on the morning of the 25th of March. Fort
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