hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Timothy Webster 1,018 0 Browse Search
George B. McClellan 269 1 Browse Search
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) 242 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 240 0 Browse Search
Price Lewis 198 0 Browse Search
John Scobell 166 0 Browse Search
John Scully 104 0 Browse Search
Leonardstown Webster 94 0 Browse Search
George Curtis 85 1 Browse Search
Carrie Lawton 75 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Allan Pinkerton, The spy in the rebellion; being a true history of the spy system of the United States Army during the late rebellion, revealing many secrets of the war hitherto not made public, compiled from official reports prepared for President Lincoln , General McClellan and the Provost-Marshal-General .. Search the whole document.

Found 58 total hits in 10 results.

Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
to the hotel, Webster entered the barroom, and while he was being attended to two men came in, apparently engaged in excited conversation. They advanced to the bar and requested drinks. The excitement in the city, attendant upon the news from Baltimore, had not abated in the least since Webster had passed through several days before, and these two men were discussing the action of the government in regard to this matter. One of them, an excitable, empty-headed fellow, was cursing the President and General Scott, in very loud tones and in unmeasured terms, for not burning the city of Baltimore to ashes, and thus teaching the rebels a lesson they would be apt to remember. The remonstrances of his friend seemed only to excite him still more, and Webster, feeling desirous of avoiding any controversy at that time, started to leave the saloon, when the angry disputant turned to him, and arrogantly demanded his opinion of the matter. I think, said Webster, that the President and Gen
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ster had already departed for Pittsburg, according to previous instructions, and hastily telegraphing to the General that I would instantly respond to his letter in person, I took the first train leading westward and was soon upon my way. Timothy Webster, meanwhile, had proceeded on his journey from Perrysville, and arrived without accident or adventure in Philadelphia. He immediately repaired to the office of Mr. Dunn, who informed him that he had just received a dispatch for him from Chicago. Webster hastily opened the message and found my directions for him to await my return at the city of Pittsburg. Remaining in the Quaker City until the following day, he took the western train and in due time arrived at his destination. On inquiring at the telegraph office in Pittsburg he received another message to the same effect as the first one, and he therefore engaged quarters at a hotel, patiently awaiting my coming. On the second day after his arrival in the Smoky City, which wa
Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Chapter 9: An adventure in Pittsburg. a mob at Bay. an explanation. good-feeling restored. Several influences operated in my mind to induce me to respond at once to this letter, annding struggle. At Philadelphia I ascertained that Timothy Webster had already departed for Pittsburg, according to previous instructions, and hastily telegraphing to the General that I would instr hastily opened the message and found my directions for him to await my return at the city of Pittsburg. Remaining in the Quaker City until the following day, he took the western train and in due time arrived at his destination. On inquiring at the telegraph office in Pittsburg he received another message to the same effect as the first one, and he therefore engaged quarters at a hotel, patieng been connected with him some time before in the detection of some burglars from the city of Pittsburg, and that officer was not slow to identify me as the detective, who had frequently enabled him
Perrysville (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
his service, now that he had assumed the command of a military department, and was about to take an active part in the impending struggle. At Philadelphia I ascertained that Timothy Webster had already departed for Pittsburg, according to previous instructions, and hastily telegraphing to the General that I would instantly respond to his letter in person, I took the first train leading westward and was soon upon my way. Timothy Webster, meanwhile, had proceeded on his journey from Perrysville, and arrived without accident or adventure in Philadelphia. He immediately repaired to the office of Mr. Dunn, who informed him that he had just received a dispatch for him from Chicago. Webster hastily opened the message and found my directions for him to await my return at the city of Pittsburg. Remaining in the Quaker City until the following day, he took the western train and in due time arrived at his destination. On inquiring at the telegraph office in Pittsburg he received anot
George B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 10
ture in Pittsburg. a mob at Bay. an explanation. good-feeling restored. Several influences operated in my mind to induce me to respond at once to this letter, and some of them of a directly personal nature. I had been acquainted with General McClellan for a long time before this, and had been intimately associated with him while engaged upon various important operations connected with the Illinois Central and the Ohio and Mississippi Railroads, of the latter of which he was then presidencheered us lustily as the train slowly moved away. Thus an adventure, which promised to be very serious in its results, terminated in a manner satisfactory to all, and Webster and myself, instead of being lynched by a Pittsburg mob, departed in safety on our journey, and arrived in Cincinnati upon the following day, prepared to receive from General McClellan such instructions as were deemed necessary by him for the furtherance of the cause in which he was engaged. Betrayed by his boots.
William H. Scott (search for this): chapter 10
abated in the least since Webster had passed through several days before, and these two men were discussing the action of the government in regard to this matter. One of them, an excitable, empty-headed fellow, was cursing the President and General Scott, in very loud tones and in unmeasured terms, for not burning the city of Baltimore to ashes, and thus teaching the rebels a lesson they would be apt to remember. The remonstrances of his friend seemed only to excite him still more, and Webster, feeling desirous of avoiding any controversy at that time, started to leave the saloon, when the angry disputant turned to him, and arrogantly demanded his opinion of the matter. I think, said Webster, that the President and General Scott understand their duties much better than I can inform them, and I suppose they do not wish to destroy the property of many who are true to the government. That is all nonsense, replied the other, sharply, there is not a single Union man in the whole
in the impending struggle. At Philadelphia I ascertained that Timothy Webster had already departed for Pittsburg, according to previous instructions, and hastily telegraphing to the General that I would instantly respond to his letter in person, I took the first train leading westward and was soon upon my way. Timothy Webster, meanwhile, had proceeded on his journey from Perrysville, and arrived without accident or adventure in Philadelphia. He immediately repaired to the office of Mr. Dunn, who informed him that he had just received a dispatch for him from Chicago. Webster hastily opened the message and found my directions for him to await my return at the city of Pittsburg. Remaining in the Quaker City until the following day, he took the western train and in due time arrived at his destination. On inquiring at the telegraph office in Pittsburg he received another message to the same effect as the first one, and he therefore engaged quarters at a hotel, patiently awaiting
Allan Pinkerton (search for this): chapter 10
hich led up to the municipal office, I at once recognized the chief of police, having been connected with him some time before in the detection of some burglars from the city of Pittsburg, and that officer was not slow to identify me as the detective, who had frequently enabled him to secure the desperate criminals whom the law had at various times pursued. As we reached the platform where the officer was standing, I stretched forth my hand, which the chief cordially grasped. Why, Mr. Pinkerton, what are you doing here? inquired the chief, with some surprise. I have come to defend one of my men, whom these people insist upon hanging as a rebel spy, but who is loyal to the core, I answered, laughingly. I will take care of that, replied the chief, and your word is sufficient for me, at the same time extending his disengaged hand and warmly greeting Webster, who stood beside me. As the crowd noticed the evident acquaintance and good-feeling that existed between the rep
Timothy Webster (search for this): chapter 10
le. At Philadelphia I ascertained that Timothy Webster had already departed for Pittsburg, accor Baltimore, had not abated in the least since Webster had passed through several days before, and tend seemed only to excite him still more, and Webster, feeling desirous of avoiding any controversyd his opinion of the matter. I think, said Webster, that the President and General Scott understemed to infuriate the man, and striding up to Webster, he asked, with an air of impertinence : ward where he stood. Drawing his revolver, Webster faced his angry assailants, who drew back invhat there would be bloodshed in consequence. Webster, whose relations with the government were of there need be no trouble about this matter; Mr. Webster can fully explain his position, and I thinke office of the chief magistrate of the city; Webster and myself walking together. The crowd incding his disengaged hand and warmly greeting Webster, who stood beside me. As the crowd noticed[14 more...]
that he had just received a dispatch for him from Chicago. Webster hastily opened the message and found my directions for him to await my return at the city of Pittsburg. Remaining in the Quaker City until the following day, he took the western train and in due time arrived at his destination. On inquiring at the telegraph office in Pittsburg he received another message to the same effect as the first one, and he therefore engaged quarters at a hotel, patiently awaiting my coming. On the second day after his arrival in the Smoky City, which was Sunday, he again went to the telegraph office, where he received information that I would probably arrive there in the course of that day. Returning to the hotel, Webster entered the barroom, and while he was being attended to two men came in, apparently engaged in excited conversation. They advanced to the bar and requested drinks. The excitement in the city, attendant upon the news from Baltimore, had not abated in the least since Web