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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Allan Pinkerton, The spy in the rebellion; being a true history of the spy system of the United States Army during the late rebellion, revealing many secrets of the war hitherto not made public, compiled from official reports prepared for President Lincoln , General McClellan and the Provost-Marshal-General .. Search the whole document.

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Enfield (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
railroads which formed the approaches from Manassas and Fredericksburg. After visiting the batteries, Webster went with Campbell to the ordnance department, where he was introduced to several persons who had charge of the ordnance stores, and from whom he elicited much valuable information. Among other things, he was informed by the Colonel in charge, that the Bermuda, an English vessel which had recently run the blockade, had brought over for the Confederate government twelve thousand Enfield rifles, a large supply of cavalry swords and a number of rifled cannon; and that, upon trial, the rifled cannon were found to be more accurate than any of their brass pieces. On the following day Webster concluded to make another inspection of the earth-works around the city. He went alone and on foot this time, as he desired to make some notes and calculations, which he was unable to do in the presence of others without running an unnecessary risk. It was a fine, brisk morning, the a
s, and the batteries were planted on the most elevated and commanding points. The heaviest of these commanded the turnpikes and railroads which formed the approaches from Manassas and Fredericksburg. After visiting the batteries, Webster went with Campbell to the ordnance department, where he was introduced to several persons who had charge of the ordnance stores, and from whom he elicited much valuable information. Among other things, he was informed by the Colonel in charge, that the Bermuda, an English vessel which had recently run the blockade, had brought over for the Confederate government twelve thousand Enfield rifles, a large supply of cavalry swords and a number of rifled cannon; and that, upon trial, the rifled cannon were found to be more accurate than any of their brass pieces. On the following day Webster concluded to make another inspection of the earth-works around the city. He went alone and on foot this time, as he desired to make some notes and calculations
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
nds. The land around Richmond consists of hills and valleys, and the batteries were planted on the most elevated and commanding points. The heaviest of these commanded the turnpikes and railroads which formed the approaches from Manassas and Fredericksburg. After visiting the batteries, Webster went with Campbell to the ordnance department, where he was introduced to several persons who had charge of the ordnance stores, and from whom he elicited much valuable information. Among other thingturn to Baltimore, to purchase a fresh supply of goods. Together they went to the office of the Provost-Marshal, where they obtained the necessary passes to insure their safe journey through the rebel lines. Leaving Richmond, they went to Fredericksburg, where he stayed long enough to visit all the places of interest around that city, and in company with Mr. Price they went on to Brooks Station, the headquarters of General Holmes, with whom Price was intimately acquainted. After remaining
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
her of the young man. Campbell treated my operative with the utmost friendliness and courtesy, and invited him to a drive during the afternoon. The invitation was accepted, and as the weather was all that could be desired, they enjoyed a very pleasant afternoon. They visited the environs for the purpose of viewing the defenses, and Webster noted the fact that there were seventeen very superior earth-work batteries around the town, forming a rude semicircle with either end resting on the James river. The entrenchments around each of these batteries were from twelve to fourteen feet wide at the top, and about ten feet deep. Some of the batteries were designed for six guns and some for sixteen. They were nearly all completed at this time, and the work upon them had been done exclusively by negro slaves. In most cases they were mounted with their full complement of guns, varying in caliber, from thirty-two to sixty-four pounds. The land around Richmond consists of hills and valleys
Warrington, Fla. (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
ampbell and Webster visited General Jones, and obtained the sought-for passes to Manassas, for which place he left early in the forenoon. On his arrival there, he learned that John Bowen, for whom he had a letter, had been taken to Richmond, but having several other messages to deliver to parties of prominence there, he busied himself during the day in forming acquaintances, and in acquiring knowledge. From Manassas he went to Centreville, where he remained a few days, and from thence to Warrington, and finally back again to Richmond, where he delivered his remaining letters. Here he formed the acquaintance of a man by the name of Price, who was engaged in running the blockade, and who was making arrangements to return to Baltimore, to purchase a fresh supply of goods. Together they went to the office of the Provost-Marshal, where they obtained the necessary passes to insure their safe journey through the rebel lines. Leaving Richmond, they went to Fredericksburg, where he staye
Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
man's hand, he bade him good-night. The next morning Mr. Campbell and Webster visited General Jones, and obtained the sought-for passes to Manassas, for which place he left early in the forenoon. On his arrival there, he learned that John Bowen, for whom he had a letter, had been taken to Richmond, but having several other messages to deliver to parties of prominence there, he busied himself during the day in forming acquaintances, and in acquiring knowledge. From Manassas he went to Centreville, where he remained a few days, and from thence to Warrington, and finally back again to Richmond, where he delivered his remaining letters. Here he formed the acquaintance of a man by the name of Price, who was engaged in running the blockade, and who was making arrangements to return to Baltimore, to purchase a fresh supply of goods. Together they went to the office of the Provost-Marshal, where they obtained the necessary passes to insure their safe journey through the rebel lines.
Brook's Station (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
man by the name of Price, who was engaged in running the blockade, and who was making arrangements to return to Baltimore, to purchase a fresh supply of goods. Together they went to the office of the Provost-Marshal, where they obtained the necessary passes to insure their safe journey through the rebel lines. Leaving Richmond, they went to Fredericksburg, where he stayed long enough to visit all the places of interest around that city, and in company with Mr. Price they went on to Brooks Station, the headquarters of General Holmes, with whom Price was intimately acquainted. After remaining several days, he left his companion, making his way to Yorktown and Gloucester Point, and from thence to Washington, where he reported to me. This first visit of Timothy Webster to Richmond was highly successful. Not only had he made many friends in that city, who would be of service to him on subsequent trips, but the information he derived was exceedingly valuable. He was able to repor
Gloucester Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
to the office of the Provost-Marshal, where they obtained the necessary passes to insure their safe journey through the rebel lines. Leaving Richmond, they went to Fredericksburg, where he stayed long enough to visit all the places of interest around that city, and in company with Mr. Price they went on to Brooks Station, the headquarters of General Holmes, with whom Price was intimately acquainted. After remaining several days, he left his companion, making his way to Yorktown and Gloucester Point, and from thence to Washington, where he reported to me. This first visit of Timothy Webster to Richmond was highly successful. Not only had he made many friends in that city, who would be of service to him on subsequent trips, but the information he derived was exceedingly valuable. He was able to report very correctly the number and strength of the fortifications around the rebel capital, to estimate the number of troops and their sources of supplies, and also the forts between t
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
to disarm at once and forever the suspicions of his enemy, what is the use of our being continually at daggers' points? You were foolish enough to insult me in Baltimore by impeaching my loyalty to the South, and I resented it, as any man would. If you repeat the vile slander, I'll do the same thing. If, however, you have anythures of his former foe. I thought you would come to your senses at last; but when did you come down here? Oh, I've been here several weeks. I enlisted in Baltimore and came down as a lieutenant, answered Zigler. But where are you from? he continued, and what is the news from the Monumental City? I am just from that cing letters. Here he formed the acquaintance of a man by the name of Price, who was engaged in running the blockade, and who was making arrangements to return to Baltimore, to purchase a fresh supply of goods. Together they went to the office of the Provost-Marshal, where they obtained the necessary passes to insure their safe jou
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 21
im. Hole on dar, Massa! Turning around, he was surprised to see Uncle Gallus, approaching him as rapidly as his stiffened limbs would permit. Well, uncle, said Webster, as the old man caught up to him-did you speak to me? You'se de man dat I 'dressed, sah-done you know me? said the old fellow, peering anxiously in the face of the detective. No, I don't remember you, said Webster, determined to ascertain whether the old darky did know him; where have you ever seen me? In Washington, sah, replied Uncle Gallus; don't you remember you saw me at Majah Allen's, when I was dah libin wid Missus Morton? Webster looked at the negro a moment, and then, feeling assured of the friendliness of his interlocutor, he said: Your face does seem familiar to me; what is your name? Dey calls me Uncle Gallus, sah, answered the old fellow. Oh, yes, said Webster, now I remember you. Golly, massa, grinned Uncle Gallus, wen I seed you gib it to Bill Zigler dis mo'nina, I
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