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Orange Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
e him. Beck's Island is above the city. On the south shore, opposite this island, Dr. Taylor had his residence on high ground. The river road, running north, leaves the Rappahannock, opposite Beck's Island, and passes over Dr. Taylor's farm. Lee's left rested on this road. He crossed the heights thence southeasterly, one height being called Stanbury Hill; his lines next found a more level plateau named the Cemetery Hill; and then in order the Marye Heights, over which passed the Orange Court House road, perpendicular to the river, dividing Fredericksburg into halves. In the city it is Hanover Street. Another roadway leaves the city three blocks lower, passes straight out parallel with the plank road till it comes to the higher ground, then, turning to the right, courses along beside the Marye Heights and, finally, goes off into the country southwesterly. This is the telegraph road. There was a connecting street near Marye Heights which went from the plank road to the tele
Deep Run (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
ld some knolls from which he could sweep all the terrain between his front and Deep Run. Hood at first rested his left on the heights and extended his division as fa. Hood, as soon as relieved by Jackson, changed position to the north side of Deep Run and held his forces for use in any direction. Longstreet, referring to the ott. The special instructions to Sumner were dated at 6 A. M. First: Extend to Deep Run and connect with Franklin; push a second column of one division or more along o keep up connection with Franklin, occupying all the ground between Hazel and Deep Run. As we have seen, the Second and Ninth Corps were already over the Rappahannoe front of the Ninth Corps extended from our flank to the left across Hazel to Deep Run. Sturgis's division left the city limits, came under a direct fire almost immves were lost in that sharp work. At 3 P. M. W. W. Burns's division crossed Deep Run and tried at Franklin's request to give what help it could. By four o'clock
Taylor's Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
he city is divided into three parts by two streams, the Hazel and the Deep Run, each of which has numerous branches. Hazel Run enters the Rappahannock close to the city. One branch from behind Marye Heights affords an extended, sheltered position in its valley; the other stream, the Deep Run, drains the high ground about Prospect Hill and enters the Rappahannock some distance south of the city. Before the arrival of Jackson, Longstreet had posted the troops, Anderson's division from Taylor's Hill eastward, to include the cemetery; Ransom's holding all the lines and works on Marye Heights; McLaws's division, coming next, covered all the low ground from Hazel Run to Harrison's place. Pickett, with his division's irregular formation, held some knolls from which he could sweep all the terrain between his front and Deep Run. Hood at first rested his left on the heights and extended his division as far as the Fredericksburg Railroad, in front of Prospect Hill, where were the notable
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
Heights, over which passed the Orange Court House road, perpendicular to the river, dividing Fredericksburg into halves. In the city it is Hanover Street. Another roadway leaves the city three bloong the foot of this ran the Fredericksburg & Potomac Railroad which, from a point called Hamilton's Crossing, continues northward, parallel to the river, and enters the city on its south side. The and was toward the north and the northwest, overlooking every approach from the direction of Fredericksburg. Hood, as soon as relieved by Jackson, changed position to the north side of Deep Run and hth sides of these roads. Burnside thought that holding the two heights with the one near Hamilton's Crossing would compel the Confederates to evacuate the whole ridge between these points. Burnsidhan those who had preceded them. These had been my troops at Fair Oaks. Their loss on this Fredericksburg front was 62 commissioned officers and 932 enlisted men. The brigade commander was himself w
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
and extended his division as far as the Fredericksburg Railroad, in front of Prospect Hill, where were the notable Walker batteries. Stuart with his cavalry and some artillery watched the remainder of the front to the Massaponax. As soon as Jackson's forces arrived the morning of December 13th, he put A. P. Hill's division into Hood's place, arranged so as to form substantially two lines, while Early's and Taliaferro's divisions made a third line. The division of D. H. Hill, being weariedly than Birney, Meade's breaking and retiring lines. Sinclair, who commanded Meade's first brigade, was badly wounded, and he lost in the action 22 officers and 496 men. The second brigade aggregated a loss of 22 officers and 718 men, while our Jackson's brigade suffered a loss of 28 officers and 525 men. Meade's artillery lost 5 officers and 25 men. These figures indicate the severity of the engagement. General Gibbon, wounded during the day, had with his division done his utmost to give M
Hamilton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
the line, and parts of General McLaws's lines were farther strengthened by rifle trenches and abatis. Burnside's orders to Franklin, which he received at so late an hour, were dated 5.50 A. M. General Hardie of his staff came to carry the message and remain with Franklin. Burnside now directed that the whole grand division be held for a rapid movement down the old Richmond road. Franklin was to send out at once a division to pass below Smithfield, to seize, if possible, the heights near Hamilton; crossing the Massaponax, the division to be well supported, and to keep open the line of retreat. Burnside informed Franklin that another column from Sumner's grand division would move up the plank road to its intersection with the telegraph road, where the troops were to divide and seize the heights on both sides of these roads. Burnside thought that holding the two heights with the one near Hamilton's Crossing would compel the Confederates to evacuate the whole ridge between these poi
Hazel River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
column. Close to the Second Corps on our left Willcox's Ninth Corps was instructed to move up abreast, to keep our left flank clear of any too enterprising Confederates, and to keep up connection with Franklin, occupying all the ground between Hazel and Deep Run. As we have seen, the Second and Ninth Corps were already over the Rappahannock. The instructions were clear and well understood. My division, having led in taking the town, must now fall to the rear, and let another have the postnd Corps (Couch's) on his right hand and to the First Corps (Reynolds's) on his left. The word support is an uncertain one, and often a very unsatisfactory one in a battle. The front of the Ninth Corps extended from our flank to the left across Hazel to Deep Run. Sturgis's division left the city limits, came under a direct fire almost immediately from artillery and infantry, marched across a rough ascending slope, and attained a crest, a close position to the Confederates' sheltered line. T
Hazel Run (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
eft faced almost south and was nearly at right angles with our main line. The Fredericksburg plateau west and southwest of the city is divided into three parts by two streams, the Hazel and the Deep Run, each of which has numerous branches. Hazel Run enters the Rappahannock close to the city. One branch from behind Marye Heights affords an extended, sheltered position in its valley; the other stream, the Deep Run, drains the high ground about Prospect Hill and enters the Rappahannock some l of Jackson, Longstreet had posted the troops, Anderson's division from Taylor's Hill eastward, to include the cemetery; Ransom's holding all the lines and works on Marye Heights; McLaws's division, coming next, covered all the low ground from Hazel Run to Harrison's place. Pickett, with his division's irregular formation, held some knolls from which he could sweep all the terrain between his front and Deep Run. Hood at first rested his left on the heights and extended his division as far as
soon obliged to send forward one regiment after another as Hall and Owen called for help. My regiments began to fire when each in its turn reached the general line of battle, so that the rattle of musketry for hours was unceasing. To help us Hazard's Rhode Island battery came up at a trot, crossed the canal, and unlimbered in the open ground in the rear of Owen's troops and for a time fired with wondrous rapidity. The battery lost so many men in a short time that it was ordered back. Frank's New York battery followed Hazard's example and endeavored by rapid fire to open the way to our infantry for a front attack. But our attempts were futile, as had been those of the other divisions. We continued, however, to make sunday experiments, hoping almost against hope to make a lodgment along the enemy's front. At last Hooker's grand division made its appearance in our rear. Hooker, himself on the field where he could take in the situation, stationed with his field glass just nort
O. B. Willcox (search for this): chapter 2.22
was to complete the fighting column. Close to the Second Corps on our left Willcox's Ninth Corps was instructed to move up abreast, to keep our left flank clear head The other corps (the Ninth) of our grand division was commanded by O. B. Willcox. Through Sumner, Willcox was required to give support to the Second Corps Willcox was required to give support to the Second Corps (Couch's) on his right hand and to the First Corps (Reynolds's) on his left. The word support is an uncertain one, and often a very unsatisfactory one in a battle. and tried at Franklin's request to give what help it could. By four o'clock Willcox, while the fire was at its height, thought he might create some diversion for ay. Getty's brigade was forced back to a poor sort of shelter near the canal. Willcox's losses aggregated 1,328 officers and men. At first, Burnside, saddened bynaturally went out to the old Ninth Corps that he had but lately commanded. Willcox brought back Burns's division from Franklin and prepared the Ninth Corps to ma
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