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Two Taverns (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.25
me. What is it, orderly? I asked. Orders from army headquarters. I took the bundle of papers in my hand. The address was to Reynolds as the wing commander. To forestall the possibility of their loss between Emmittsburg and Marsh Run, I opened the dispatches, as was customary, read them, and sent them forward with a note. The orders were as follows: OrdersHeadquarters at Taneytown--Third Corps to Emmittsburg; Second Corps to Taneytown; Fifth Corps to Hanover; Twelfth Corps to Two Taverns; First Corps to Gettysburg; Eleventh Corps to Gettysburg (in supporting distance); Sixth Corps to Manchester; cavalry to front and flanks, well out in all directions, giving timely notice of positions and movements of the enemy. With these orders came a clear indication of Meade's opinion of the location of Hill and Longstreet, as between Chambersburg and Gettysburg, while Ewell was believed to be still occupying Carlisle and York. He closed his circular letter with these significan
Frederick, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.25
at once began the sending of his forces so much eastward that we knew that any movement against Lee's rear or the Confederate communications via Harper's Ferry had been given up. The evening of June 28, 1865, the whole army was at or near Frederick, Md. In his dispatch that evening Meade said: I propose to move this army to-morrow in the direction of York. By a glance at the map it will be seen that this plan was the precise opposite of that of Hooker, as indicated by his dispatches two d and Philadelphia. The army of Meade was also well supported by a fine reserve; for Halleck, strange to tell, had given to Meade what he had withholden from Hooker, namely, the force at Harper's Ferry. French moved it, now 11,000 strong, to Frederick, Md. It here constituted a cover to our depots, to Washington communications, and a ready help for any contingency. The infantry and artillery extended over a large area. Military experts ask: Was not this an error of Meade's, to so move forwa
Westminster (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.25
ned at Emmittsburg for that day; the Third (Sickles's corps) moved from Taneytown to a point near Emmittsburg; the Twelfth (Slocum's) went forward and encamped near Littlestown. The headquarters and remaining corps did not change. Buford's cavalry was kept ahead of Reynolds, in the vicinity of Gettysburg. On June 30th the Confederate army formed a concave line (concavity toward us), embracing Chambersburg, Carlisle, and York. Ours formed an indented line, extending from Marsh Run to Westminster, the left of that line being thrown far forward. If Lee could bring his men together east of the South Mountain, near Cashtown, it would appear that he might strike us in the flank-before we could assemble-blow after blow, and beat us in detail. Of course, it was a bold undertaking. The safe course of a cautious mind would have been different-probably to have concentrated beyond the South Mountain as Lee had done at Antietam; but Longstreet was at hand, and urged Lee to adopt more risk
Culp's Hill (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.25
This small stream, fed by three or four smaller ones, courses from the north and flows southeast of the town. The Cemetery Ridge, so often described, begins at Culp's Hill, broadens out on the top westerly to take in the cemetery itself, and then turns to trend due south to Zeigler's Grove; then bends a little south, to ascend gray, the college, and all the undulating valley of open country spread out between the ridges. There was a beautiful break in the ridge to the north of me, where Culp's Hill abuts against the cemetery, and touches the creek below. It struck me that here one could make a strong right flank. Colonel Meysenberg was my adjutant gene take the right, and we will put these troops in line. After a few friendly words between us, Hancock did as I suggested. He also took Wadsworth's division to Culp's Hill and we worked together in prompt preparations until sundown, when, after Slocum's arrival at that time, IIancock returned to meet General Meade. Slocum's troop
McAllister (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.25
knocking at the door aroused me. What is it, orderly? I asked. Orders from army headquarters. I took the bundle of papers in my hand. The address was to Reynolds as the wing commander. To forestall the possibility of their loss between Emmittsburg and Marsh Run, I opened the dispatches, as was customary, read them, and sent them forward with a note. The orders were as follows: OrdersHeadquarters at Taneytown--Third Corps to Emmittsburg; Second Corps to Taneytown; Fifth Corps to Hanover; Twelfth Corps to Two Taverns; First Corps to Gettysburg; Eleventh Corps to Gettysburg (in supporting distance); Sixth Corps to Manchester; cavalry to front and flanks, well out in all directions, giving timely notice of positions and movements of the enemy. With these orders came a clear indication of Meade's opinion of the location of Hill and Longstreet, as between Chambersburg and Gettysburg, while Ewell was believed to be still occupying Carlisle and York. He closed his circular
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.25
ore sumptuous would be his supply. Lee's position in Pennsylvania gave ominous threats to Harrisburg and Philadelphia, caused real fright to the loyal people of Baltimore, and to the administration at Washington. The life of the Nation was in its greatest perilit appeared to hang upon but a thread of hope, and, under God, the thder Buford aiming for Gettysburg, and the others fighting and chasing the Confederate cavalry, which daringly swept around our army between us and Washington and Baltimore and Philadelphia. The army of Meade was also well supported by a fine reserve; for Halleck, strange to tell, had given to Meade what he had withholden from Hook to so move forward his command, exposing his left to be attacked by at least two-thirds of Lee's army? Meade's answer is in his own words: If Lee is moving for Baltimore, I expect to get between his main army and that place. If he is crossing the Susquehanna, I shall rely upon General Couch holding him until I can fall upon his
York, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.25
g of June 28, 1865, the whole army was at or near Frederick, Md. In his dispatch that evening Meade said: I propose to move this army to-morrow in the direction of York. By a glance at the map it will be seen that this plan was the precise opposite of that of Hooker, as indicated by his dispatches two days before. The reason frted not only on our side of the Potomac, but as already occupying Chambersburg, Carlisle, and threatening Harrisburg, and having at least a brigade in the town of York. He did not just then seem to care greatly for his communications, any more than did Hannibal of old after he had once obtained his strong foothold on the Contineind Cashtown and Gettysburg, for the grand gathering of his forces. When the order came Ewell was near Harrisburg; he had already drawn back Early's division from York. Early's and Rodes's, with the corps chief, coming together, succeeded in reaching Heidelsburg, about ten miles north of Gettysburg, the evening of the 30th, but
een that this plan was the precise opposite of that of Hooker, as indicated by his dispatches two days before. The reason for the change was that Lee was reported not only on our side of the Potomac, but as already occupying Chambersburg, Carlisle, and threatening Harrisburg, and having at least a brigade in the town of York. He did not just then seem to care greatly for his communications, any more than did Hannibal of old after he had once obtained his strong foothold on the Continent of Europe. Lee had now corn, flour, cattle, and horses in abundance, and the farther north he pushed, the more sumptuous would be his supply. Lee's position in Pennsylvania gave ominous threats to Harrisburg and Philadelphia, caused real fright to the loyal people of Baltimore, and to the administration at Washington. The life of the Nation was in its greatest perilit appeared to hang upon but a thread of hope, and, under God, the thread was Meade and his army. A little later information determ
Cashtown (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.25
forward. If Lee could bring his men together east of the South Mountain, near Cashtown, it would appear that he might strike us in the flank-before we could assembleinformation, Lee, June 29th, designated a point east of South Mountain, behind Cashtown and Gettysburg, for the grand gathering of his forces. When the order came Ewy had fewer routes from which to choose. Hill's corps led, and was at or near Cashtown the evening of the 30th. Longstreet, with two divisions, remained that nigh Hill's corps) had already encountered our cavalry. After Heth had arrived in Cashtown, eight miles from Gettysburg, he sent, on the 30th, Pettigrew's brigade with wnd marched back four miles toward his own division, halted at Marsh Run on the Cashtown road, and reported to his chief that Meade's army in force was near at hand. Lutheran Seminary, who could from that high point look westward far out toward Cashtown along the Chambersburg pike and behold the thickening columns of Lee, could al
Cemetery Ridge (Oregon, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.25
d do with my troops, or recommend for Reynolds's wing, or for the army, should my advice be sought, that is, use that Cemetery Ridge as the best defensive position within sight. Recognizing that one's mind is usually biased in favor of his own thed with me as to whether I received any instructions or intimation from any quarter whatever touching the selection of Cemetery Ridge and Hill. The testimony, both direct and indirect, points all one way: that I did not; that I chose the position and of General Reynolds (Captain Rosengarten), who thinks he heard General Reynolds tell my aiddecamp that I must occupy Cemetery Ridge, is certainly in error. Captain Daniel Hall was the only aid of mine sent to the general; the only one who saw him ding into the town at your side I remember that, as we passed along the road at its base, you pointed to the crest of Cemetery Ridge on our right and said: There's the place to fight this battle, or words to similar effect. Speaking of the same t
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