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ton, Sherman had about the same numbers as at Resaca. The Army of the Tennessee, with Blair on the left, faced Hood. A short distance beyond, eastward, was Garrard's cavalry, trying to keep back the Confederate cavalry of Wheeler. Thomas, with his three Union corps, touched the middle bend opposite Loring and part of Hardee. Hooker's corps made Thomas's right; then came, on the extreme right, the Twenty-third Corps and Stoneman's cavalry, under Schofield. The Union right, already by June 20th reached as far south as Olley's Creek. The whole infantry stretch of Sherman's front was at that time fully eight miles. There are four distinct combats which ought to come into this battle of Kenesaw: 1. The combat with Wheeler's cavalry near Brush Mountain. 2. The cavalry combat against Jackson. 3. The battle of Kolb's Farm on June 22d. 4. Our determined attacks and repulses at different points all along the Kenesaw line during June 27th. General Sherman's field orders
Thomas's right; then came, on the extreme right, the Twenty-third Corps and Stoneman's cavalry, under Schofield. The Union right, already by June 20th reached as far south as Olley's Creek. The whole infantry stretch of Sherman's front was at that time fully eight miles. There are four distinct combats which ought to come into this battle of Kenesaw: 1. The combat with Wheeler's cavalry near Brush Mountain. 2. The cavalry combat against Jackson. 3. The battle of Kolb's Farm on June 22d. 4. Our determined attacks and repulses at different points all along the Kenesaw line during June 27th. General Sherman's field orders notified us that he and his staff would be near Kenesaw Mountain on June 27th. I recall, in general, the character of the country near to Kenesaw, mostly wild, hilly, and rugged, and thickly covered with virgin trees, oak and chestnut, with here and there a clearing made for a small farm, or a bald opening that seemed to have come of itself, though
ed by Palmer and placed in reserve behind Hooker. Hooker's position is a very strong one, and before I left him he certainly had his troops as well together as Howard has had for the last three days, and Howard has repulsed every attack the enemy has made on him in very handsome style .... The enemy cannot possibly send an overwhelming force against Hooker without exposing his weakness to McPherson. Taking these things into account, Sherman took occasion the next day after the battle (June 23d) to ride down to Kolb's Farm, fully determined in his own sharp way to call Hooker to an account for his exaggerations. Sherman's determination to do so was increased when he found Hooker had used during the combat but two of his own divisions, for Butterfield's, kept back in reserve, had not been engaged at all during the day. Again, he saw, as before reported, one of Schofield's divisions properly placed abreast of Hooker's right, constituting what Sherman denominated a strong right fla
in general, the character of the country near to Kenesaw, mostly wild, hilly, and rugged, and thickly covered with virgin trees, oak and chestnut, with here and there a clearing made for a small farm, or a bald opening that seemed to have come of itself, though I but dimly remember Sherman's temporary headquarters, which were fixed on Signal Hill for a few days only. Mr. J. C. Van Duzer (a superintendent of telegraph lines) telegraphed to the Assistant Secretary of War at 9.30 P. M. on June 24th: Sherman moved to a point in field three miles west of Marietta, and Thomas to a new headquarters camp half a mile farther to our right, about the same distance from Marietta. Van Duzer thus, by the wires keeping up his connection with Washington, united our commands. He used for us what was called the field line of telegraph wire, and connected his railroad line with Sherman, and Sherman with Thomas half a mile distant, and with Schofield, at least two miles in the same direction; al
bat against Jackson. 3. The battle of Kolb's Farm on June 22d. 4. Our determined attacks and repulses at different points all along the Kenesaw line during June 27th. General Sherman's field orders notified us that he and his staff would be near Kenesaw Mountain on June 27th. I recall, in general, the character of the coJune 27th. I recall, in general, the character of the country near to Kenesaw, mostly wild, hilly, and rugged, and thickly covered with virgin trees, oak and chestnut, with here and there a clearing made for a small farm, or a bald opening that seemed to have come of itself, though I but dimly remember Sherman's temporary headquarters, which were fixed on Signal Hill for a few days onlyg line of the enemy's earthworks; in fact, at every place where the corps had been engaged, this noble young man earnestly and heartily performed his part. On June 27th (upon his horse) he led in that terrible assault on the enemy's breastworks. We did not carry them, but part of his command reached the works. A sergeant beari
n an army commander without cause, and that Hooker's exaggeration had led Thomas to'weaken other portions of his line-something that might have led to disaster-and that the dispatch came near causing him to do the same as Thomas, administered in his own blunt manner a caustic reprimand. Sherman, as I think, was unaware of his own severity. He justified himself in this phrase: I reproved him more gently than the occasion warranted. The result of this reproof was that from that date to July 27th following, Hooker felt aggrieved. On that day he was relieved, at his own request, by General A. S. Williams. This battle of Kolb's Farm was wholly on the Kenesaw line extended southward. Sherman, on account of guerrilla and cavalry attacks far in his rear, upon his own line of railroad, was greatly distressed concerning his communications. They were not secure enough, he declared, to permit him to break away from his base of supplies. The Kenesaw Mountain-sometimes called the Ken
on account of guerrilla and cavalry attacks far in his rear, upon his own line of railroad, was greatly distressed concerning his communications. They were not secure enough, he declared, to permit him to break away from his base of supplies. The Kenesaw Mountain-sometimes called the Kenesaws, probably on account of an apparent cross break in the range giving apparently two mountains --is the highest elevation in Georgia, west of the Chattahoochee. It is the natural watershed, and was in 1864, upon its sides, mostly covered with trees. From its crest Johnston and his officers could see our movements, which were believed to be hidden; they have recorded accounts of them in wonderful detail. The handsome village of Marietta, known to Sherman in his youth, lying eastward between the mountain and the river, could be plainly seen. Johnston could not have found a stronger defensive position for his great army. Prior to the battle of Kolb's Farm the entire Confederate army had take
June 22nd, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 2.33
Chapter 32: battle of Kolb's Farm and Kenesaw The weather continued stormy, and it was not until June 22, 1864, that any positive advance could be made. On that date, as he often did, Sherman rode from end to end of our line, in order that he might thoroughly understand the position of his army. He ordered Thomas to advance his right corps, which was Hooker's; and he instructed Schofield by letter to keep his whole army as a strong right flank in close support of Hooker's deployed line. It will be remembered that Schofield's Twenty-third Corps at this time constituted Sherman's extreme right. Hooker came next leftward, and then my corps. Hooker, in accordance with his orders, pressed forward his troops in an easterly direction, touching on my right. There was heavy skirmish firing along the whole front. As Hooker went forward he first drove in the enemy's cavalry. The movement was necessarily slow and bothersome; and at 2.30 P. M. the contest became very hot. The e
July 15th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 2.33
always displayed by the American soldier when properly led. The entire Confederate loss was 522 against 2,500 for Sherman. It is a wonder our loss was not greater. Among our greatest losses was that of General Harker, who was in characteristics much like McPherson. Would that he could have lived to have realized some of his bright hopes, and the country to have reaped still mpre benefit from his grand and heroic qualities I I wrote at the time of him: Headquarters Fourth Corps, July 15, 1864. My Dear Colonel: I knew General Harker as a cadet while I was on duty as instructor at West Point. He was then remarkable for independence of character and uprightness of conduct. I was particularly happy to renew my acquaintance with him after I came West. I was surprised and pleased to find that so young a man had won the complete confidence of the commanding general of the department. On taking command of this corps Harker was still a colonel, and as I was a comparative stra
l Howard will assault the enemy's intrenchments at some point near the left of Stanley's and Davis's divisions, which will be selected by General Howard after a careful reconnoissance. He will support his attack by such disposition of his artillery as, in his judgment, is best calculated to insure success. II. Major General Palmer will, with his column on the right of General Howard's, cooperate with the latter by carrying the enemy's works immediately in his front. The batteries of General Baird's and Davis's divisions will remain as at present posted until the contemplated movement is made. General King's division will occupy its present position, but hold itself in readiness to follow up any advantage gained by the other troops. III. Major General Hooker will support General Palmer on the latter's right with as much of his force as he can draw from his lines, selecting positions for his artillery best calculated to enfilade the enemy's works to his left and on General Palm
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