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Kenesaw Mountain (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.33
nfantry stretch of Sherman's front was at that time fully eight miles. There are four distinct combats which ought to come into this battle of Kenesaw: 1. The combat with Wheeler's cavalry near Brush Mountain. 2. The cavalry combat against Jackson. 3. The battle of Kolb's Farm on June 22d. 4. Our determined attacks and repulses at different points all along the Kenesaw line during June 27th. General Sherman's field orders notified us that he and his staff would be near Kenesaw Mountain on June 27th. I recall, in general, the character of the country near to Kenesaw, mostly wild, hilly, and rugged, and thickly covered with virgin trees, oak and chestnut, with here and there a clearing made for a small farm, or a bald opening that seemed to have come of itself, though I but dimly remember Sherman's temporary headquarters, which were fixed on Signal Hill for a few days only. Mr. J. C. Van Duzer (a superintendent of telegraph lines) telegraphed to the Assistant Secre
Sandtown (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.33
ois succeeded him in command, but fell immediately after. He was a brave and skillful officer. The death of these two noble leaders was at the time a great misfortune to the troops, and will ever be to the army and country a great loss. General Davis's losses were 770. Sherman still hoped against hope that Schofield, followed by Hooker, might make a lodgment upon Johnston's weakened flank. Schofield's dispatch at 10 A. M. was encouraging: Colonel Reilly has carried a position on the Sandtown road and driven the enemy back. Cox will push forward as much as possible. Hascall is using his artillery freely and pressing strongly, but finds the enemy too strong to give hope of getting his works. But at last Cox's dispatch, received at 4.30 P. M., showed that nothing more could be done. Cox and Stoneman, routing a Confederate detachment and driving it back, seizing and holding an important Confederate outwork, had done good service for future operations, but that, important as i
Lookout Mountain, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.33
e that through the foot is very painful, but not fatal. You go back to the field hospital, and when this battle is over I will visit you there. After he began to ride back from me, he turned his horse about, and, with tears bedimming his eyes, he looked in my face again and said: Oh, general, I am so glad I was wounded and not you l When, near sunset, I went to the field hospital, I learned that McDonald had been sent back with other wounded to the general hospital on the top of Lookout Mountain. And he did die from that severe wound and was buried among the unknown. Some very peculiar controversies, in which Sherman, Thomas, Schofield, and Hooker were involved, grew out of this battle. During the battle, Hooker was asked by Sherman from a signal station: How are you getting along! Near what house are you? He replied as follows: Kolb's House, 5.20 P. M. We have repulsed two heavy attacks and feel confident, our only apprehension being from our extreme right. Three e
Dallas, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.33
cooperation from all his officers without apparent effort. The only complaint I ever heard was that if Harker got started against the enemy he could not be kept back. Yet I never found him other than cool and self-possessed. Whenever anything difficult was to be done-anything that required pluck and energy-we called on Harker. At Rocky Face, where his division wrested one-half of that wonderful wall of strength; at Resaca, where he tenaciously held a line of works close under fire; at Dallas, where he held on for several days with thin lines in connection with his brother officers and hammered their works at a distance of less than 100 yards; at Muddy Creek, where he reinforced the skirmishers and directed their movements with so much skill and vigor as to take and hold a strong line of the enemy's earthworks; in fact, at every place where the corps had been engaged, this noble young man earnestly and heartily performed his part. On June 27th (upon his horse) he led in that t
West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.33
nst 2,500 for Sherman. It is a wonder our loss was not greater. Among our greatest losses was that of General Harker, who was in characteristics much like McPherson. Would that he could have lived to have realized some of his bright hopes, and the country to have reaped still mpre benefit from his grand and heroic qualities I I wrote at the time of him: Headquarters Fourth Corps, July 15, 1864. My Dear Colonel: I knew General Harker as a cadet while I was on duty as instructor at West Point. He was then remarkable for independence of character and uprightness of conduct. I was particularly happy to renew my acquaintance with him after I came West. I was surprised and pleased to find that so young a man had won the complete confidence of the commanding general of the department. On taking command of this corps Harker was still a colonel, and as I was a comparative stranger in the corps, I was anxious to get him to serve as my chief of staff. He assured me he would do eve
Resaca (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.33
ch as Johnston did on the defensive behind the prepared works, his losses were hardly ever as great as ours; so that, I think, at Kenesaw he had as many men as at Resaca. My judgment is confirmed by the surprisingly long defensive line which he occupied. Hood, at first, had the right, covering all the wagon approaches and trailsnow come to us from the west. He brought enough men to compensate for Sherman's previous losses; so that, like Johnston, Sherman had about the same numbers as at Resaca. The Army of the Tennessee, with Blair on the left, faced Hood. A short distance beyond, eastward, was Garrard's cavalry, trying to keep back the Confederate ca be done-anything that required pluck and energy-we called on Harker. At Rocky Face, where his division wrested one-half of that wonderful wall of strength; at Resaca, where he tenaciously held a line of works close under fire; at Dallas, where he held on for several days with thin lines in connection with his brother officers
Noses Creek (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.33
ing against them. I know there was some force in front of Palmer and Howard, for I was there. Still, it is very natural the enemy should meet Hooker at that point in force, and I gave Schofield orders this morning to conduct his column from Nose's Creek, on the Powder Springs road, toward Marietta and support Hooker's right flank, sending his cavalry down the Powder Springs road toward Sweet Water and leaving some infantry from his rear to guard the forks. ... It was natural for Hooker to the southern slope of that mountain, continued on to the neighborhood of Olley's Creek. It was virtually a north and south bending alignment, convex toward us. Its right was protected by rough Brush Mountain and Noonday Creek. Its center had Nose's Creek in front of it, but the strength of its almost impregnable part was in the natural fortress of the south slope of Kenesaw. The intrenchments or breastworks everywhere, whatever ypu call those Confederate protecting contrivances, were excel
Noonday Creek (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.33
ve found a stronger defensive position for his great army. Prior to the battle of Kolb's Farm the entire Confederate army had taken substantially its new line; the Confederate right, which abutted against Brush Mountain on the north, took in the Kenesaw; the line passing down the southern slope of that mountain, continued on to the neighborhood of Olley's Creek. It was virtually a north and south bending alignment, convex toward us. Its right was protected by rough Brush Mountain and Noonday Creek. Its center had Nose's Creek in front of it, but the strength of its almost impregnable part was in the natural fortress of the south slope of Kenesaw. The intrenchments or breastworks everywhere, whatever ypu call those Confederate protecting contrivances, were excellent. They had along the fronting slopes abundant slashings, that is, trees felled toward us with limbs embracing each other, trimmed or untrimmed, according to whichever condition would be worse for our approach. Bat
Powder Springs (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.33
is very natural the enemy should meet Hooker at that point in force, and I gave Schofield orders this morning to conduct his column from Nose's Creek, on the Powder Springs road, toward Marietta and support Hooker's right flank, sending his cavalry down the Powder Springs road toward Sweet Water and leaving some infantry from hisPowder Springs road toward Sweet Water and leaving some infantry from his rear to guard the forks. ... It was natural for Hooker to make reply, for Sherman had asked questions of him. And, naturally, at such a time there was some excitement at Hooker's headquarters. As soon as Sherman received this disturbing message directly from Hooker, he first answered thus: Dispatch received. Schofield was ordered this morning to be on the Powder Springs and Marietta road, in close support of your right. Is not this the case? There cannot be three corps in your front; Johnston has but three corps, and I know from full inspection that a full proportion is now, and has been all day, on his right and center. Sherman also sent for
Marietta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.33
ng to conduct his column from Nose's Creek, on the Powder Springs road, toward Marietta and support Hooker's right flank, sending his cavalry down the Powder Springs received. Schofield was ordered this morning to be on the Powder Springs and Marietta road, in close support of your right. Is not this the case? There cannot be y have recorded accounts of them in wonderful detail. The handsome village of Marietta, known to Sherman in his youth, lying eastward between the mountain and the rianton wagon road. Hardee's corps began there, crossed the next highway (the Marietta and Lost Mountain road), and gradually drew back till his left was somewhere b.30 P. M. on June 24th: Sherman moved to a point in field three miles west of Marietta, and Thomas to a new headquarters camp half a mile farther to our right, about the same distance from Marietta. Van Duzer thus, by the wires keeping up his connection with Washington, united our commands. He used for us what was called the
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