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M. of July 3d. The enemy then had gone, and Stanley's skirmishers were in their works! At three without danger of running upon other troops. Stanley's division, full of excitement, the front cove discovered. At 3.30 of that day I caused Stanley to deploy lines well supported just behind hive of tall trees near a farmhouse, where were Stanley's headquarters. Howard, Sherman remarked, shall see, general, I rejoined. I sent for Stanley, who held my leading division, and gave him i to be aimed at the very place where Sherman, Stanley, and myself, with officers gathered around uss by trees as well as they could. Our men on Stanley's front did as skirmishers are always instrucby another, a rough pier log structure, which Stanley made to the island, and Newton finally finishhere the road via Decatur to Atlanta passes. Stanley saved a part of the bridge from Confederate fre he instructed me to take my two divisions, Stanley's and Wood's, to the left two miles off from
d somewhere below Marietta by turning around Schofield as a door around a free hinge. In a telegroops, back of us all, and on down river to Schofield, whom he was to aid and support till the rem as the Nickajack square in conjunction with Schofield. Sherman's quickening orders, given underhee behind him. I have ordered McPherson and Schofield to cross the Nickajack at any cost, and work the enemy suspected no movement there until Schofield's men about 3 P. M. July 8th were making thed him, already made a display of force below Schofield, in front of Pace's Ferry. My demonstrationme five miles northward to find the right of Schofield's command and to protect his bridge across aoin. McPherson at the Roswell factories. Schofield's bridge was over Phillip's Ferry. Power's rossed, and, staying there, put trenches on Schofield's right; Newton, after his return from Roswediately rebuilt it. Sherman was now with Schofield. The night of the 9th the latter with his A[5 more...]
G. W. Smith (search for this): chapter 2.34
road bent off toward the river. Loring's corps was on the right and Hardee's on the left of that road. Hood's stretched off toward the extreme left, where was G. W. Smith with his Georgia troops supporting General Jackson's cavalry. Wheeler's cavalry division watched the extreme right. Hood was made uneasy by McPherson's workhim in check. Johnston instantly on this report dispatched (Cheatham's) division. That, however, was not enough. In the evening of that same Fourth of July G. W. Smith declared that the Yankee cavalry was pressing him with such force that he would have to abandon the ground he had been holding and retire before morning to Genehoochee; Hood on the right from Clear Creek around to some point near the Augusta Railroad; and Hardee holding the center. Hood's right was strengthened by General G. W. Smith with his Georgia troops. Wheeler with his cavalry watched the front and right, and Jackson the left. Just as Johnston had put everything in capital sha
off northward to puzzle the Confederate Kenesaw watchers, and with Garrard's cavalry to take the place of all McPherson's army. The next mordrew out from Johnston's front that very night of July 2d, leaving Garrard's dismounted cavalry in his place; he moved on down behind Thomas, asserted, was at that very time behind those formidable works. Garrard, with his cavalry, had advanced as fast as he could down the Chattthe Nickajack to the Chattahoochee far below Johnston's forces. Garrard had now gone back two miles above the Roswell factories to occupy to make his first crossing near the Roswell factories; he ordered Garrard's cavalry division to go there. As soon as Garrard could charge iGarrard could charge into the place he drove out the detachment of Wheeler's cavalry and destroyed the factories. The Confederate guard had rushed over the Chattaf men in battle, but was already an eminent practical engineer? Garrard crossed at 6 A. M. with little loss, and Newton, of my corps, foll
mpted passage of the river; Colonel Jackson and his active cavalry were working below the Confederate army, and Wheeler above the Marietta and Atlanta railway crossing of the Chattahoochee, to and beyond the Roswell factories; besides, Forrest, the Confederate cavalry leader, was worrying the posts far behind us, guarding our single line of supply. Sherman attended to that matter in a most effectual manner by appointing a district command with its headquarters at Chattanooga, and putting (Steedman) with detailed instructions, at the head of it. He had given him additional troops and adequate authority to combine his men and give blow for blow. Believing that this annoyance could be even better removed by imitating Forrest's raids, Sherman sent out General Rousseau from the Tennessee border far down into Alabama, to swing around, destroy railroads as far south as Talladega and Opelika; and then, if possible, to return to him near Atlanta. Rousseau started from Decatur, Ala., July
Joseph Hooker (search for this): chapter 2.34
ademy just south of the city, and found the enterprising Hooker already there. Hooker was crossing the column at an angle and obstructing it. This shows somewhat a. There he found my skirmishers, some of Palmer's, and certain forerunners of Hooker's corps, coming in at once from four directions. All, for the time, seemed abse city and dismounted. I had halted my head of column till Thomas could stop Hooker's cross march and let me take the road down river. It was precious time to l to Palmer athwart my path. At last we were ready to advance. I had the left, Hooker and McPherson the right, as we went. At a short distance below Marietta I caements of Schofield had forestalled and prevented any contact with the enemy by Hooker, or even by Blair and Dodge, till they had passed beyond him. They picked up a ituation. We will never have such a chance again, and I want you to impress on Hooker, Howard, and Palmer the importance of the most intense energy, of attack to-nig
ority to combine his men and give blow for blow. Believing that this annoyance could be even better removed by imitating Forrest's raids, Sherman sent out General Rousseau from the Tennessee border far down into Alabama, to swing around, destroy railroads as far south as Talladega and Opelika; and then, if possible, to return to him near Atlanta. Rousseau started from Decatur, Ala., July 9th. This remarkable raid was successful. His cavalry made a lodgment upon the Southern Railroad west of Opelika and destroyed some twenty miles of it. He defeated every Confederate troop sent against him with a loss of but twelve killed and thirty wounded; and he brought back a large number of captured mules and horses. Rousseau astonished the inhabitants everywhere by his unexpected visit, and did not join us, after his consummate raid, until July 23d. To make our connections complete, two railway breaks, a long one above Marietta and one shorter below, near Vining's Station, had to be
Frank T. Sherman (search for this): chapter 2.34
wn straight for Atlanta. On July 1st, from Sherman's Signal Hill, he had issued a set of generalehemence, at any cost of life or material. Sherman was sending McPherson with Stoneman's cavalrywhere were Stanley's headquarters. Howard, Sherman remarked, what are you waiting fort Why don't appeared to be aimed at the very place where Sherman, Stanley, and myself, with officers gathered t field, with an ascending slope. Meanwhile, Sherman himself passed from tree to tree toward the r northward to Roswell's factories. Colonel Frank T. Sherman for some reason was riding leisurely , near where I fought on the Fourth of July. Sherman set him to reconnoitering for a convenient riutious, blunt, strong-willed, and fearless of Sherman's strategy. He was not the general to executdivision commanders had pretty well fulfilled Sherman's preliminary orders, having made what he denderate flames and immediately rebuilt it. Sherman was now with Schofield. The night of the 9th[26 more...]
John A. Logan (search for this): chapter 2.34
, and found the enterprising Hooker already there. Hooker was crossing the column at an angle and obstructing it. This shows somewhat the confusion that arose as divisions and corps, apparently on their own motion, were each moving for Marietta, striving to get there first. McPherson was not long delayed, for he drew out from Johnston's front that very night of July 2d, leaving Garrard's dismounted cavalry in his place; he moved on down behind Thomas, stretching to the Nickajack. But Logan's Fifteenth Corps delayed and passed through Marietta after the retreat. Doubtless, Johnston, who had suspected just such a movement when Cox first appeared across Olley's Creek, was sure of it when, after the failures of the 27th, Sherman kept his cavalry and infantry creeping on and on down the Sandtown road, till Stoneman, on the lead, had actually touched the Chattahoochee River; and we had already in the morning of July 2d Morgan L. Smith's division as far down as the Nickajack squar
G. M. Dodge (search for this): chapter 2.34
talled and prevented any contact with the enemy by Hooker, or even by Blair and Dodge, till they had passed beyond him. They picked up a few stragglers. Dodge (ofDodge (of McPherson's army), this Saturday, July 3d, did a good work; he marched down to a place near Ruff's Mills and went into camp near the Nickajack square, while sendinghotted cannon, celebrate the Fourth of July. At daybreak this bright morning Dodge followed up his leading brigade. His whole force went over the creek, and party a skirmish exhibit much stronger than usual, then all moved briskly forward. Dodge stirred up quite as brisk a contest in Nickajack square as we did near Smyrna cd and repair the bridge. Who could build a trestle bridge like his general, G. M. Dodge, who was not only a superb commander of men in battle, but was already an emod, that separated him from us. Newton, on the morning of the 9th waited for Dodge to replace him at the Roswell village and let him return to me. Johnston, no
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