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McDonough (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
o near to Logan's corps on its right, that Blair sent Giles A. Smith with his division to guard Leggett's left and rear, stationing his men along the line of the McDonough road, with the left flank refused toward the east. Blair knew that there was an interval of a mile, nearly all woods, between him and Dodge, except.that McPheour artillery, Hood had caused his forces to march back through the city and pass on southward on the west side of Intrenchment Creek, and cross it far below the McDonough road near Cobb's Mill. Hardee then set out with three divisions, but Cleburne, who had been all day withstanding Leggett and Giles A. Smith, fell into his columhile for Wheeler. A night march doubly fatigues all troops. Hardee very properly rested and refreshed his men. His deployed front, with its left tangent to the McDonough road, faced westerly. It covered the flank and rear of McPherson's entire force. Hardee now deliberately began his march while Hood in front of Atlanta was h
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
we at last came upon the principal defenses of the city of Atlanta. They were made up of small forts or redoubts, fitted forned the hilly prominences that faced in all directions. Atlanta then looked to us like a hill city defended by encircling . McPherson's army had two corps in line, Logan's-facing Atlanta, and Blair'scarrying on his line bending back to its termiey talked they heard some skirmish firing near them toward Atlanta; suddenly there was the duller sound of distant cannon offee now deliberately began his march while Hood in front of Atlanta was holding the forts and curtains opposite Thomas and Schvered before his enterprising foes could carry them off to Atlanta. This was the group. I had never till then seen Sherman Every Confederate who was not made a prisoner fled toward Atlanta, and Captain DeGress, though his horses were killed during the outside Confederates and those defending the works of Atlanta. Sherman, whose face now relaxed into a pleasant mood, sa
Intrenchment Creek (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
rried them beyond Dodge's command, and exposed their lines to a raking fire of artillery, to which two or three regiments of riflemen sent by Dodge, getting a cross fire, added the effect of their rifles. The reason for this unexpected Confederate approach is as follows: As soon as it was dark enough to get away from Thomas's front without endangering his columns from our artillery, Hood had caused his forces to march back through the city and pass on southward on the west side of Intrenchment Creek, and cross it far below the McDonough road near Cobb's Mill. Hardee then set out with three divisions, but Cleburne, who had been all day withstanding Leggett and Giles A. Smith, fell into his column; they moved on all night. Hardee's head of column, continuing the circuit far enough from Blair to escape attention, made northing and easting enough to be within fiye miles of Decatur by sunrise. Fifteen miles by country roads or paths, or no roads at all, in a dark night, necessaril
Decatur, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
f the Tennessee-Sprague's brigade was guarding trains ten miles to the rear at Decatur, while the remaining brigade of the fourth division, H. J. McDowell commandingward Atlanta; suddenly there was the duller sound of distant cannon off toward Decatur; what could that mean? Sherman took out his pocket compass to test the direct escape attention, made northing and easting enough to be within fiye miles of Decatur by sunrise. Fifteen miles by country roads or paths, or no roads at all, in. It took considerable time to close up and get in order. The pickets toward Decatur found Sprague's brigade on the alert near that little town. Hardee did not knundred yards to Schofield's front. He had before this sent out one brigade to Decatur to help Sprague defend the trains, and Cox with two others over to be near to : Let the army of the Tennessee fight it out In the afternoon Sprague, near Decatur with his own regiments, aided by Kuhn's battalion of mounted infantry, handsom
August Mersy (search for this): chapter 1.1
s face, but in his whole pose, a concentrated fierceness. Schofield had located several batteries in an excellent position to pour spherical case and canister shot into the broken interval. All this was being carefully and rapidly done. At the same time the grand Charles R. Woods, whose division was next to Schofield, was quietly forming his brigades at right angles to and in rear of our line. Logan was also bringing some of Harrow's division to bear from beyond them, and moving up August Mersy's brigade from Dodge to replace Martin's, whose early call and march to help the leftmost battle had weakened Lightburn's front. The cannon were making much disturbance. The smoke was often blinding and the roar deafening; such firing kept back the remainder of Cheatham's lines. Woods's men advanced steadily down the line; there was no break, no hesitation, no halt; on, on they go till the opening is reached and the continuity of Logan's line was soon restored. Every Confederate who
lows: As soon as it was dark enough to get away from Thomas's front without endangering his columns from our artillery, Hood had caused his forces to march back through the city and pass on southward on the west side of Intrenchment Creek, and croced westerly. It covered the flank and rear of McPherson's entire force. Hardee now deliberately began his march while Hood in front of Atlanta was holding the forts and curtains opposite Thomas and Schofield, freeing Cheathamis corps that it migam had been wounded, and up which the gallant Force had successfully led his brigade against great odds the day before. Hood, seeing Hardee's soldiers emerge from the timber and ascend the hill, triumphantly said: Cheatham, push out your divisionspulsed Wheeler's vigorous cavalry and artillery attacks and saved all the trains under his care from capture or damage. Hood, at last weary, drew Hardee and Cheatham back to the shelter of the Atlanta forts, leaving havoc behind, but sweeping in s
H. J. McDowell (search for this): chapter 1.1
air'scarrying on his line bending back to its termination. Dodge's (Sixteenth Corps) was pretty well scattered; at first Sweeny's division, the Second (of Dodge), was near Logan's right. Fuller, commanding the Fourth division, only one brigade being present with General Dodge's headquarters, was encamped well back in rear of the center of the Army of the Tennessee-Sprague's brigade was guarding trains ten miles to the rear at Decatur, while the remaining brigade of the fourth division, H. J. McDowell commanding, was held as a reserve close in rear of Blair's corps. From Dodge's headquarters to Blair's left flank in a straight line was just about one mile. Schofield's army bending westward was next to McPherson's, and Thomas's, beyond Schofield in a semicircular formation, embraced the Atlanta forts clear on to Sherman's extreme right. As on his arrival Fuller was directed to support Blair, his force was depleted still more by having to send away, at Blair's request, pioneers a
John H. Kuhn (search for this): chapter 1.1
n DeGress, though his horses were killed during the cannonade, had the joy of recovering his big guns. Schofield now urged Sherman to put a column on Cheatham's flank from himself and Thomas to roll up that Confederate line and so interpose between the outside Confederates and those defending the works of Atlanta. Sherman, whose face now relaxed into a pleasant mood, said: Let the army of the Tennessee fight it out In the afternoon Sprague, near Decatur with his own regiments, aided by Kuhn's battalion of mounted infantry, handsomely repulsed Wheeler's vigorous cavalry and artillery attacks and saved all the trains under his care from capture or damage. Hood, at last weary, drew Hardee and Cheatham back to the shelter of the Atlanta forts, leaving havoc behind, but sweeping in some prisoners of war, some flags, and many cannon. He reported bravely to Richmond and issued orders of congratulation to his troops. He doubtless at first esteemed this bloody battle a Confederate v
Francis DeGress (search for this): chapter 1.1
nding near the Howard House then on the prolongation of Logan's line of battle. The fearful break of Logan's right front had been made. Our troops seemed to have swung around so as to be at right angles with their proper line of battle. Captain DeGress, who had just lost his Parrott guns, was on the ground, near Sherman's stirrup. He was apparently much chagrined at his loss and eager to have them recovered before his enterprising foes could carry them off to Atlanta. This was the group.nced steadily down the line; there was no break, no hesitation, no halt; on, on they go till the opening is reached and the continuity of Logan's line was soon restored. Every Confederate who was not made a prisoner fled toward Atlanta, and Captain DeGress, though his horses were killed during the cannonade, had the joy of recovering his big guns. Schofield now urged Sherman to put a column on Cheatham's flank from himself and Thomas to roll up that Confederate line and so interpose between
J. B. McPherson (search for this): chapter 1.1
chofield's army bending westward was next to McPherson's, and Thomas's, beyond Schofield in a semico be accounted for by any known facts. So McPherson, staff, and orderlies mounted and rode off t same firing. General Blair had been with McPherson that morning, just before McPherson started McPherson started to see Sherman. Blair had then gone directly to his own headquarters not far away, when about 12 Mes of the shears would close and crush poor McPherson's entire command. The rivet of the blades wDodge, sending his officers off with orders, McPherson, with a single orderly, just then thinking th all the party that had taken to themselves McPherson's immediate belongings; and the remains of tl. General Blair himself was not far from McPherson. He said: I saw him enter the woods and healled him. At once Blair notified Logan that McPherson was either slain or a prisoner, and that Lo command. The instant that Sherman heard of McPherson's fall he sent an order to Logan to assume c[8 more...]
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