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October 3rd (search for this): chapter 1.5
that village which bears the name of Pumpkintown. There was a trestle bridge farther down the Chattahoochee, at Moore's Ferry, recently constructed. Over it he drew the supplies of his army. He reached Lost Mountain and was established there October 3d. Hood heard that we had an extensive subdepot at Allatoona Pass, so he directed Lieutenant General Stewart to cross a bridge over the Etowah River not far north of Allatoona and have it broken up; also to send one of his divisions to disablet's, Cheatham's, and Stephen D. Lee's corps were all included in the big northward raid. After Stewart had captured some garrisons he drew back to Hood, near Lost Mountain. Now we commenced the pursuit in earnest from Atlanta the morning of October 3d. By the 5th we had reached the vicinity of the battlefield, Kenesaw Mountain. As soon as Sherman heard that a division of the enemy had been seen marching northward not far from the railroad line he divined that the subdepot at Allatoona Pa
October 4th (search for this): chapter 1.5
enesaw. But, in fact, there were two dispatches, the first, to wit: Commanding Officers, Allatoona, Kingston, and Rome: The enemy moving on Allatoona, thence to Rome. Sherman. Second dispatch: General Corse, Rome: Sherman directs you to march forward and join Smith's division with your entire command, using cars, if to be had, and burn provisions rather than lose them. [Signed] Vandever, General Corse's answering dispatch to Smith, at Cartersville, of the same date, October 4th, says: General: My last information is that a large force is moving on Allatoona. In accordance with General Sherman's instructions, I will move my entire command to Cartersville and unite with General Raum in attacking the enemy at Allatoona direct. J. M. Corse, Brigadier General. Corse was quick of apprehension and always ready for action. Taking all the troops he could make immediately available, and having a broken railroad quickly repaired, he hurried on in the night of
October 5th (search for this): chapter 1.5
out Allatoona, and, if possible, seize and destroy the depot; he sent French's division for this work. The morning of October 5th French moved up in sight of the garrison, deployed his command, and very soon ran over the outer lines of its advance le, and having a broken railroad quickly repaired, he hurried on in the night of the 4th to reach Allatoona by 1 A. M. October 5th. As soon as he arrived he unloaded his men and supplies and sent his train back to Rome for more men. Corse brought fast; we are coming. And Corse's reply: Allatoona, Ga., October 5, 1864. Where is Sherman? Kenesaw Mountain, October 5th. Near you. Tell Allatoona hold on. Sherman says he is working hard for you. Again: Kenesaw Mountain, October 6nced at once the destruction of the railroad. My army was near Kenesaw, pulling on as rapidly as possible northward October 5th. During the night of the 12th we all reached the vicinity of Resaca, having, in fact, recovered all of our stations
October 6th (search for this): chapter 1.5
hold fast; we are coming. And Corse's reply: Allatoona, Ga., October 5, 1864. Where is Sherman? Kenesaw Mountain, October 5th. Near you. Tell Allatoona hold on. Sherman says he is working hard for you. Again: Kenesaw Mountain, October 6th, 2 P. M. How is Corse? What news? Dayton, Aid-de-Camp. Answer: Allatoona, October 6th, 2 P. M. Captain L. M. Dayton, Aid-de-Camp: I am short of a cheekbone and one ear, but am able to whip all hell yet. John M. Corse, Brigadier October 6th, 2 P. M. Captain L. M. Dayton, Aid-de-Camp: I am short of a cheekbone and one ear, but am able to whip all hell yet. John M. Corse, Brigadier General. For his acts of special gallantry in heroically defending Allatoona, Brigadier General John M. Corse was awarded the commission of Brevet Major General of Volunteers, October 5, 1864. It was quite a feat to communicate backward and forward sixteen miles by signal over the enemy's heads. Even General Hood said: General Corse won my admiration by his gallant resistance. General Corse's command belonging to my army, I issued the following order: General field orders no. 18.
October 16th (search for this): chapter 1.5
ood's headquarters were that night near Villanow, but a few miles from us. The next morning at dawn there were no signs of the Confederate army in our neighborhood, except those of vacant camps. We proceeded as rapidly as we could as far as the town of Gaylesville, Ala. There we halted October 21st. Hood's whole army had by this time passed on. His own headquarters were then at Gadsden. The only skirmish in consequence of our pursuit that any part of my force had was on the morning of October 16th, when my leftmost division, under General Charles R. Woods, ran upon Hood's rear guard at Ship's Gap. We there captured a part of the Twenty-fourth South Carolina. From that time on the Confederates were moving rapidly away from us. From the 21st to the 28th of October we remained at Gaylesville or in that vicinity, while Sherman was communicating with his commanders at Chattanooga and Nashville, and with his commander in chief at Washington concerning the future. One of my corps o
October 21st (search for this): chapter 1.5
two corps, Osterhaus's and Ransom's commands, in close proximity to Hood's army, and we thought then that Hood would delay with hope of engaging our forces piecemeal as they came through the mountains. Hood's headquarters were that night near Villanow, but a few miles from us. The next morning at dawn there were no signs of the Confederate army in our neighborhood, except those of vacant camps. We proceeded as rapidly as we could as far as the town of Gaylesville, Ala. There we halted October 21st. Hood's whole army had by this time passed on. His own headquarters were then at Gadsden. The only skirmish in consequence of our pursuit that any part of my force had was on the morning of October 16th, when my leftmost division, under General Charles R. Woods, ran upon Hood's rear guard at Ship's Gap. We there captured a part of the Twenty-fourth South Carolina. From that time on the Confederates were moving rapidly away from us. From the 21st to the 28th of October we remained at
October 28th (search for this): chapter 1.5
There we halted October 21st. Hood's whole army had by this time passed on. His own headquarters were then at Gadsden. The only skirmish in consequence of our pursuit that any part of my force had was on the morning of October 16th, when my leftmost division, under General Charles R. Woods, ran upon Hood's rear guard at Ship's Gap. We there captured a part of the Twenty-fourth South Carolina. From that time on the Confederates were moving rapidly away from us. From the 21st to the 28th of October we remained at Gaylesville or in that vicinity, while Sherman was communicating with his commanders at Chattanooga and Nashville, and with his commander in chief at Washington concerning the future. One of my corps officers, General Ransom, who was admirably commanding the Seventeenth Corps, was taken ill with what I supposed at the time was a temporary attack. It began about the time we drew out from East Point. After Corse's victory at Allatoona, Ransom had written him as follo
October 29th (search for this): chapter 1.5
at Allatoona, Ransom had written him as follows: We all feel grateful to God for your brilliant victory, and are proud of our old comrade and his noble division. You have the congratulation and sympathy of the Seventeenth Corps. Ransom was a young officer who had graduated from Norwich University, Vermont, the son of the distinguished Colonel Ransom who lost his life in Mexico. He was a large, strong, finely formed, handsome young man of acknowledged ability, exalted character, and great promise. Hie was so desirous to go on this campaign that, though ill, nothing could prevent his undertaking it. At first he rode his horse and did his full duty night and day. When he grew weaker he had himself drawn at the head of his command in an ambulance, and at last he caused his men to carry him along on an army stretcher, resolute to the end. He died, October 29th, in a house near our road, carried thither by his men, while his command was en route between Gaylesville and Rome, Ga.
ted States ever did maltreat its prisoners or not, it had long been contrary to the laws of nations to cripple an enemy by the disabling, starving, or killing of prisoners of war. War is bad enough, but cruelty to prisoners belongs to the dark ages and to egregious barbarism. Those who belonged to Sherman's army did not have much difficulty with those opposed to us concerning exchanges, yet we had but few opportunities to make them. The general cartel on which we acted was established in 1862. The first item was: All prisoners captured by either party should be paroled and delivered at certain points specified within ten days after their capture, or as soon thereafter as practicable. Second: Commanding general after a battle, on the battlefield might parole their prisoners by agreement. Third: No other paroles were valid; for example, if a partisan command or a guerrilla band captured a foraging party, and attempted to parole those who constituted the party, such paroles woul
September 29th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 1.5
prison ships during our Revolution. The published accounts of what each army was doing while encamped, the one about Atlanta, and the other at first in the vicinity of Lovejoy's Station, and later near Palmetto and the Chattahoochee, are somewhat fragmentary, but they indicate something of the trying situation. General Sherman was constantly meditating something for the future. That something was generally revolving upon a universal pivot, or hinging upon what Hood might do. September 29, 1864, Hood left his position near Palmetto, Ga., putting Brigadier General Iverson with his command to watch and harass whatever Sherman might keep in the neighborhood of Atlanta. Hood crossed the Chattahoochee, with Jackson's cavalry in advance. He had a pontoon bridge at Phillips' Ferry, near that village which bears the name of Pumpkintown. There was a trestle bridge farther down the Chattahoochee, at Moore's Ferry, recently constructed. Over it he drew the supplies of his army. He
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