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Ogeechee (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.6
t coming forward from Savannah. The Confederate general then in charge of a geographical division, Braxton Bragg, peremptorily ordered Wheeler with his cavalry and some artillery to stick close to us; to harass us in front and flank, and, above all, to destroy subsistence and forage in the route over which we advanced. Some 5,000 Confederates fell back from Sandersville before Sherman arrived. At that point, the 25th, Sherman himself accompanied my left corps on the eastern bank of the Ogeechee, while I followed the one or the other of my two columns on the right bank, usually keeping them from six to ten miles apart. Corse's division was as far to the right as Wrightsville, but I had it brought gradually back into a closer connection with the rest of the Fifteenth Corps. In fact, this division, though having the longest journey, came up to the vicinity of Station No. 2, some thirteen miles ahead of Blair's Seventeenth Corps, the leading regiment reaching that part of the Oge
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.6
ch a bone of contention at the battle of Atlanta. The First Missouri Battery also bore a part in this small battle. There are other small affairs in which single brigades and small regiments bore a part, but now speedily all the right wing was brought up against the defenses of Hardee, which he had so carefully prepared to envelop the city from Savannah River around north to the bay below. As the left wing had marched abreast of mine, Sherman, establishing his own headquarters on the Louisville road, soon invested Savannah, covering every approach, in conjunction with our naval fleet, except the communications with Charleston across the Savannah River. Just before this operation of investment began-December 9, 1864, after our last combat, and near the Savannah Canal — I drew up a dispatch to the commander of the naval forces to this effect: We have met with perfect success thus far. Troops in fine spirits and near by. Respectfully, O. O. Howard, Major General Commanding
Fort McAllister (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.6
told him to take with him Sergeant Myron J. Amick and Private George W. Quimby and proceed down the Ogeechee, passing Confederate stations, the King's Bridge, Fort McAllister, and all obstructions, and go out to sea and communicate with the fleet. It seemed next to impossible that the feat could be accomplished, but Captain Duncann. The party kept pretty well under cover until evening. During the night they appear to have made considerable progress, but did not succeed in getting past Fort McAllister. They went ashore to get a negro guide and some provisions; they tied up their boats and then made their way through some bushes and thin groves till they cae from the bank, so they quietly pushed away, avoided a boat filled with oarsmen who were passing over the Ogeechee from a Confederate gunboat at anchor below Fort McAllister. They ran so near this gunboat that they were in terror for fear some noise that they had to make in paddling, or some flashlight from the vessel, would dis
Cedartown (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.6
Chapter 40: return to Atlanta; the March to the sea; Battle of Griswoldville, ga. The Army of the Tennessee changed its camp from Gaylesville, Ala., to Cave Spring and Cedartown, Ga., making short marches. Every hostile soldier was so far away that our occupation of the country was peaceful. The inhabitants soon became acquainted with us, and our camps afforded good centers for trade. On account of insufficiency of time to graze we lost many of the poorer mules and some artillery hors redistribution of artillery was made, leaving but one battery to a division; then, by judicious exchanges, the good horses were attached to the retained batteries, and the remainder were hurried off toward our depot at Rome and Chattanooga. Cedartown, Ga., and all its bright neighborhood, rejoiced in a plentiful supply of grain. So our animals day by day were gaining flesh and their strength, and, indeed, my army was surprisingly well supplied with provisions from the country during our retu
Dallas, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.6
emainder were hurried off toward our depot at Rome and Chattanooga. Cedartown, Ga., and all its bright neighborhood, rejoiced in a plentiful supply of grain. So our animals day by day were gaining flesh and their strength, and, indeed, my army was surprisingly well supplied with provisions from the country during our return march, which was made by short stages for the very purpose of rest and refreshment after the 300 miles of severe additional campaigning. November 3d I encamped near Dallas. The 4th we were grouped near Lost Mountain, where it was easier to lose your way from the thick woods and crooked roads than to lose sight of the mountain. In fact, the mountain, unaccountably named Lost, enabled a wanderer to refind his pathway. The 5th brought the Army of the Tennessee back to Smyrna Camp Ground. There we remained until November 13th. General Sherman himself, as early as November 2d, had changed his headquarter belongings again to the little hamlet of Kingstown
Jonesboro (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.6
tted for gallantry and merit in the Mexican War. He was a self-respecting, dignified man of marked ability. He had left the army, and was trying his skill in civil pursuits, holding just before the war the office of Street Commissioner in New York City, when the secession outburst took him south. Now he was said to be commanding the Confederates in my front in the neighborhood of Macon, November 15, 1864. The size of his command was: Return to Atlanta Effective muskets (sent from Jonesboro)1,900 Reserves of all kinds1,200 Two batteries (a battalion, probably 200)200 State-line troops400 Actual fighting men with rifles and muskets.3,700 The battle began at 2.30 P. M. and lasted until sunset. During the engagement the enemy made three separate charges and were as often repulsed with heavy loss. General Woods foots his losses: 13 killed, 79 wounded, and 2 missing; total, 93. The enemy's loss was a little over 600. General Smith had been delayed in Macon while hi
Milledgeville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.6
hey found that we had two corps of our army across all their roads of egress toward Atlanta, Milledgeville, Augusta, or Savannah; hence came about the battle of Griswoldville of which I reported Noveelf, yet the captors escaped in safety. Slocum, with the left wing, had meanwhile reached Milledgeville, where his men had instituted a mock legislature, completed the issue of a newspaper, and ceeping with his subsequent remarkable career. It was before Sherman and Slocum had reached Milledgeville. In a letter I remarked: To-morrow I will have everything substantially at Gordon. Our marin Duncan's enterprise ten miles ahead of us and toward our left front, I said: The Mayor of Milledgeville surrendered the town, the capital of Georgia, formally to Captain Duncan and a few scouts. ng full news and causing Kilpatrick with his cavalry to cross over to the left, Sherman from Milledgeville issued instructions for further movements November 23d. It was in this communication that h
Millen (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.6
he telegraph office. Duncan had returned to me, meeting me at Gordon; and so I sent him back again November 22d with a fuller report of our late battle to be delivered to General Sherman. After receiving full news and causing Kilpatrick with his cavalry to cross over to the left, Sherman from Milledgeville issued instructions for further movements November 23d. It was in this communication that he ordered Kilpatrick to use all possible effort to rescue our prisoners of war confined near Millen. In the accomplishment of this the cavalry failed. Referring to the railroad I was substantially following, Sherman suggested that great attention should be paid to the destruction of this road. Besides burning bridges and trestles, the iron should be carefully twisted and warped, so that it would not be possible ever to use it again. To this end, our rate of travel should be reduced to ten miles a day. One or two harsh measures may be inserted to modify somewhat the feeling that ha
Griswoldsville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.6
Chapter 40: return to Atlanta; the March to the sea; Battle of Griswoldville, ga. The Army of the Tennessee changed its camp from Gaylesville, Ala., to Cave Spring and Cedartown, Ga., making short marches. Every hostile soldier was so far awayoisily driving before them a part of Kilpatrick's cavalry. Woods thereupon sent Walcutt that way past the station of Griswoldville. Our cavalry and infantry kept skirmishing in a lively manner, till Osterhaus naturally thought that Walcutt had g across all their roads of egress toward Atlanta, Milledgeville, Augusta, or Savannah; hence came about the battle of Griswoldville of which I reported November 27, 1864: That this engagement was of a more severe character and our loss a littons. We have destroyed (as instructed) a large amount of cotton, the Planters' Factory, a pistol factory, and a mill at Griswold; the latter three by Kilpatrick. Now, referring to Captain Duncan's enterprise ten miles ahead of us and toward our l
Camp Ground (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.6
to lose your way from the thick woods and crooked roads than to lose sight of the mountain. In fact, the mountain, unaccountably named Lost, enabled a wanderer to refind his pathway. The 5th brought the Army of the Tennessee back to Smyrna Camp Ground. There we remained until November 13th. General Sherman himself, as early as November 2d, had changed his headquarter belongings again to the little hamlet of Kingstown, Ga. From this point that same day was the significant dispatch to Gra Shanty forward to the Chattahoochee River, burning the ties in heaps and twisting the rails. The stretch of railroad completely disabled was about twenty-two miles in extent. November 13, 1864, my army broke camp and proceeded from Smyrna Camp Ground to Atlanta. We chose a place for concentration at a railroad station south of the city, then called White Hall, situated about halfway to East Point. Corse arrived the evening of the 14th. John E. Smith's division, that had been guarding t
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