hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Europe 76 0 Browse Search
Americans 44 0 Browse Search
Lowell 41 5 Browse Search
United States (United States) 36 0 Browse Search
1896 AD 32 32 Browse Search
Walter Scott 32 2 Browse Search
Emerson 26 0 Browse Search
America (Netherlands) 26 0 Browse Search
Matthew Arnold 22 0 Browse Search
Shelley 21 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life. Search the whole document.

Found 108 total hits in 33 results.

1 2 3 4
Halifax (Canada) (search for this): chapter 30
to see the Rocky Mountains from New York Harbor. It is as if a son who has removed far from his old home should expect his father to find his way about a newly built house in Omaha, merely because he himself remembers every nook and corner of the old house in East Belchertown. How much do we ourselves know about any part of the continent, new or old, which we have never visited? How many American citizens could draw, off-hand, a recognizable sketch-map showing the relative positions of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Newfoundland? How many know whether Guatemala and Yucatan adjoin each other, and which is north or south of the other? It is safe to say not one in a thousand. Nay, how many Eastern citizens even know the relative positions on the map of Wyoming, Idaho, and Arizona, or can state without much reflection the comparative sizes of New York and Nevada? At an examination of teachers in a New England city, scarcely one could be found who knew where Cape Malabar was; some
Lowell (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
weet Clover a young girl says, sadly, I wonder if I shall ever go East; to New York, Boston, Philadelphia, I should like them to be something beside names to me-but what an idea! This is essentially the feeling with which other Americans look towards Europe. It is when the ties of literary association begin to form that older and newer communities come to be more on an equality. We go to England to hear Shakespeare's lark sing at heaven's gate; and Thomas Hughes came to America to hear Lowell's bobolink. These ties again are formed very slowly, and the colonial spirit still lingers so much among us that a very little English reputation goes farther in the United States than a much higher American fame in England. Yet here we are sometimes startled with the discovery that we are also interesting to our elder cousins, as well as our elder cousins to us. Twenty-five years ago the present writer, visiting Europe for the first time, began with the city of Cork, and stood delighted b
Guatemala (Guatemala) (search for this): chapter 30
who has removed far from his old home should expect his father to find his way about a newly built house in Omaha, merely because he himself remembers every nook and corner of the old house in East Belchertown. How much do we ourselves know about any part of the continent, new or old, which we have never visited? How many American citizens could draw, off-hand, a recognizable sketch-map showing the relative positions of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Newfoundland? How many know whether Guatemala and Yucatan adjoin each other, and which is north or south of the other? It is safe to say not one in a thousand. Nay, how many Eastern citizens even know the relative positions on the map of Wyoming, Idaho, and Arizona, or can state without much reflection the comparative sizes of New York and Nevada? At an examination of teachers in a New England city, scarcely one could be found who knew where Cape Malabar was; some were wholly ignorant, others thought it must be in the East Indies,
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
et but few to show; in that respect we still go to Europe, if only as Robinson Crusoe went to his wreck, to bring away what we can find. Even the World's Fair at Chicago did not, as was expected, draw shoals of foreigners to visit it. Then, of course, the ancestral ties run all in the other direction; no European crosses the Atlar States towards the older ones is like that of the inhabitants of those older States towards Europe, a mingling of filial affection and jealousy. In the popular Chicago tale of Sweet Clover a young girl says, sadly, I wonder if I shall ever go East; to New York, Boston, Philadelphia, I should like them to be something beside namen any man. She has keenly pointed out faults as well as she has recognized merits; she does not applaud the architecture and decoration of the Woman's Building at Chicago, and fearlessly points out that manner is far less important than matter in America, even in the eyes of those who call themselves artists. Yet she is spoken of
America (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
rm that older and newer communities come to be more on an equality. We go to England to hear Shakespeare's lark sing at heaven's gate; and Thomas Hughes came to America to hear Lowell's bobolink. These ties again are formed very slowly, and the colonial spirit still lingers so much among us that a very little English reputation anc, whose book on The Condition of Women in the United States justly criticises American women as knowing little of the history of any country except England and America, has been herself reproved for the amount and variety of knowledge which she has crowded into these brief essays. We have probably never had such good criticismshe does not applaud the architecture and decoration of the Woman's Building at Chicago, and fearlessly points out that manner is far less important than matter in America, even in the eyes of those who call themselves artists. Yet she is spoken of by some leading journals as if she were a mere commonplace gossip, without earnestne
Wyoming (Wyoming, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
ertown. How much do we ourselves know about any part of the continent, new or old, which we have never visited? How many American citizens could draw, off-hand, a recognizable sketch-map showing the relative positions of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Newfoundland? How many know whether Guatemala and Yucatan adjoin each other, and which is north or south of the other? It is safe to say not one in a thousand. Nay, how many Eastern citizens even know the relative positions on the map of Wyoming, Idaho, and Arizona, or can state without much reflection the comparative sizes of New York and Nevada? At an examination of teachers in a New England city, scarcely one could be found who knew where Cape Malabar was; some were wholly ignorant, others thought it must be in the East Indies, whereas it is in reality the southeastern point of Massachusetts. If we ourselves are thus easily perplexed by questions in our own national geography, can we reasonably expect a visitor from the Thames
Cork (Irish Republic) (search for this): chapter 30
me to America to hear Lowell's bobolink. These ties again are formed very slowly, and the colonial spirit still lingers so much among us that a very little English reputation goes farther in the United States than a much higher American fame in England. Yet here we are sometimes startled with the discovery that we are also interesting to our elder cousins, as well as our elder cousins to us. Twenty-five years ago the present writer, visiting Europe for the first time, began with the city of Cork, and stood delighted before the humble sign Fishamble Lane, because it recalled the song whose burden was, Misthress Judy McCarthy of Fishamble Lane. On mentioning this a day or two after, in London, to that fine old Irish abolitionist, the late Richard D. Webb, he received it with sympathy, and said that he felt just so when he first saw the sign Madison Square in New York and thought of Miss Flora McFlimsey. It was pleasant to find that we too had some small poetic associations to be e
Newfoundland (Canada) (search for this): chapter 30
New York Harbor. It is as if a son who has removed far from his old home should expect his father to find his way about a newly built house in Omaha, merely because he himself remembers every nook and corner of the old house in East Belchertown. How much do we ourselves know about any part of the continent, new or old, which we have never visited? How many American citizens could draw, off-hand, a recognizable sketch-map showing the relative positions of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Newfoundland? How many know whether Guatemala and Yucatan adjoin each other, and which is north or south of the other? It is safe to say not one in a thousand. Nay, how many Eastern citizens even know the relative positions on the map of Wyoming, Idaho, and Arizona, or can state without much reflection the comparative sizes of New York and Nevada? At an examination of teachers in a New England city, scarcely one could be found who knew where Cape Malabar was; some were wholly ignorant, others thou
Yucatan (Yucatan, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 30
ed far from his old home should expect his father to find his way about a newly built house in Omaha, merely because he himself remembers every nook and corner of the old house in East Belchertown. How much do we ourselves know about any part of the continent, new or old, which we have never visited? How many American citizens could draw, off-hand, a recognizable sketch-map showing the relative positions of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Newfoundland? How many know whether Guatemala and Yucatan adjoin each other, and which is north or south of the other? It is safe to say not one in a thousand. Nay, how many Eastern citizens even know the relative positions on the map of Wyoming, Idaho, and Arizona, or can state without much reflection the comparative sizes of New York and Nevada? At an examination of teachers in a New England city, scarcely one could be found who knew where Cape Malabar was; some were wholly ignorant, others thought it must be in the East Indies, whereas it is
East India (search for this): chapter 30
er Guatemala and Yucatan adjoin each other, and which is north or south of the other? It is safe to say not one in a thousand. Nay, how many Eastern citizens even know the relative positions on the map of Wyoming, Idaho, and Arizona, or can state without much reflection the comparative sizes of New York and Nevada? At an examination of teachers in a New England city, scarcely one could be found who knew where Cape Malabar was; some were wholly ignorant, others thought it must be in the East Indies, whereas it is in reality the southeastern point of Massachusetts. If we ourselves are thus easily perplexed by questions in our own national geography, can we reasonably expect a visitor from the Thames or the Tweed to know more? The things which add interest to special localities are either their ancestral associations or their connection with great names or their works of art, including buildings. Of the last we have as yet but few to show; in that respect we still go to Europe, i
1 2 3 4