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ies. For my part I live in the stagnation. Last year I had eight thousand dollars income. Now I have my salary of forty dollars a week, and no great hopes of more. Of the first volume of the Cyclopaedia we are printing an edition of one thousand instead of ten thousand, which we should have done. It promises well, however, for ultimate profit, and I believe will be recognized as a good book by the critics. The Household Book of Poetry, which should have paid me one thousand dollars in January, lies sound asleep in the hope of a blessed resurrection. But we don't cry about it; that is, I and the wife and babies; but keep on having as jolly a time as ever, even without the luxuries of other days. But we have got a good cook, and if you were only back in the second story front, there would indeed be reason to believe in a superintending Providence. It's stupid in you, too, to be there in Paris, when we could keep you so nicely at work on the Cyclopaedia, filling up the gaps as
March 27th (search for this): chapter 11
which resulted in severing his connection with the Tribune, as heretofore related. On April 11th he wrote again to Huntington. I quote in part as follows: To put my news butt-end first, let me say that I have left the Tribune, and have just written to your brother to send on the share of stock in his hands as security, in order that I may sell the same with my other shares, and pay him the thousand dollars for which it is pledged. The facts very briefly narrated are: On Thursday, March 27th, I was notified that Mr. Greeley had given the stockholders notice that I must leave, or he would, and that they wanted me to leave accordingly. No cause of dissatisfaction being alleged, and H. G. having been of late more confidential and friendly than ever, not once having said anything betokening disaffection to me, I sent a friend to him to ascertain if it was true, or if some misunderstanding was at the bottom of it. My friend came and reported it was true, and that H. G. was im
March 28th (search for this): chapter 11
fied that Mr. Greeley had given the stockholders notice that I must leave, or he would, and that they wanted me to leave accordingly. No cause of dissatisfaction being alleged, and H. G. having been of late more confidential and friendly than ever, not once having said anything betokening disaffection to me, I sent a friend to him to ascertain if it was true, or if some misunderstanding was at the bottom of it. My friend came and reported it was true, and that H. G. was immovable. On Friday, March 28th, I resigned, and the trustees at once accepted it, passing highly complimentary resolutions, and voting me six months salary after the date of my resignation. Mr. Ripley opposed the proceeding in the trustees, and above all insisted on delay, in order that the facts might be ascertained; but all in vain. On Saturday, March 29th, Mr. Greeley came down, called another meeting of the trustees, said he had never desired me to leave, that it was a damned lie that he had presented such a
March 29th (search for this): chapter 11
to ascertain if it was true, or if some misunderstanding was at the bottom of it. My friend came and reported it was true, and that H. G. was immovable. On Friday, March 28th, I resigned, and the trustees at once accepted it, passing highly complimentary resolutions, and voting me six months salary after the date of my resignation. Mr. Ripley opposed the proceeding in the trustees, and above all insisted on delay, in order that the facts might be ascertained; but all in vain. On Saturday, March 29th, Mr. Greeley came down, called another meeting of the trustees, said he had never desired me to leave, that it was a damned lie that he had presented such an alternative as that he or I must go, and finally sent me a verbal message desiring me to remain as a writer of editorials; but has never been near me since to meet the damned lie in person, nor written one word on the subject. I conclude, accordingly, that he is glad to have me out, and that he really set on foot the secret caba
April 11th (search for this): chapter 11
ividends; taxes of every kind were increasing, and hard times seemed to be so certain that he thought of letting his house. Happily the necessity for that measure of retrenchment passed away with the return of business activity, which characterized the vigorous prosecution of the war. The financial crisis had passed, but it was swiftly followed by a crisis in Dana's personal and professional career which resulted in severing his connection with the Tribune, as heretofore related. On April 11th he wrote again to Huntington. I quote in part as follows: To put my news butt-end first, let me say that I have left the Tribune, and have just written to your brother to send on the share of stock in his hands as security, in order that I may sell the same with my other shares, and pay him the thousand dollars for which it is pledged. The facts very briefly narrated are: On Thursday, March 27th, I was notified that Mr. Greeley had given the stockholders notice that I must leave
ea, not around it, lies the appointed way to the Land of Promise, and it will be steadfastly trodden by a brave and loyal people. That Greeley approved this patriotic programme, there is no reason to doubt, but that he penned it can hardly be conceived. It is as certain as any unproven thing can be that it was Dana's brain which conceived it and Dana's hand that wrote it. About the middle of May, 1861, the Tribune began to discuss the feasibility of a movement on Richmond; by the first of June it had begun to cry, Onward, and by the end of that month its columns bristled with: The Nation's war-cry-Forward to Richmond! Forward to Richmond! The Rebel Congress must not be allowed to meet there on July 20th! By that date the place must be held by the National army! And this was kept up with but little variation till the defeat of McDowell's army at Bull Run put a violent end to it. It was for years supposed that Dana himself wrote the article, Forward to Richmond,
enned it can hardly be conceived. It is as certain as any unproven thing can be that it was Dana's brain which conceived it and Dana's hand that wrote it. About the middle of May, 1861, the Tribune began to discuss the feasibility of a movement on Richmond; by the first of June it had begun to cry, Onward, and by the end of that month its columns bristled with: The Nation's war-cry-Forward to Richmond! Forward to Richmond! The Rebel Congress must not be allowed to meet there on July 20th! By that date the place must be held by the National army! And this was kept up with but little variation till the defeat of McDowell's army at Bull Run put a violent end to it. It was for years supposed that Dana himself wrote the article, Forward to Richmond, but Dana said, in later years, that it was written by a regular contributor, Fitz-Henry Warren, of Iowa. There is not the slightest doubt, however, that Dana was directly responsible for its publication, and for its constan
put a violent end to it. It was for years supposed that Dana himself wrote the article, Forward to Richmond, but Dana said, in later years, that it was written by a regular contributor, Fitz-Henry Warren, of Iowa. There is not the slightest doubt, however, that Dana was directly responsible for its publication, and for its constant reiteration in the columns of the Tribune. It is also certain that when disaster overtook the national army, Greeley made haste to declare, in a letter dated July 23d, filling an entire column of the Tribune, over his own signature: I wish to be distinctly understood as not seeking to be relieved from any responsibility for urging the advance of the Union army in Virginia, though the precise phrase, Forward to Richmond, was not mine, and I would have preferred not to reiterate it. Henceforth I bar all criticism in these columns on army movements. Now let the wolves howl on! I do not believe they can goad me into another personal letter. In r
t the wolves howl on! I do not believe they can goad me into another personal letter. In reply to this the paper was urged by a correspondent to continue its military criticism of the government and its efforts to stimulate the army into activity, but declined on the ground that it had reached its conclusion after sleepless nights of thought, and that it could not stand the criticism of itself that followed the disaster of Bull Run. Not content with this, it hastened to declare anew, July 29th: If the States that hate the Union-mean to destroy the Union, were resolved to make war on the Union-had been willing to depart peaceably, and to arrange quietly and decently the terms of separation, we alone among the people of the free States expressed a willingness to let them go. But they would not go in that way. They set themselves to stealing arsenals, fortifications, and custom-houses, that were the property of the Nation. From that hour it has never been possible to let the
August 6th (search for this): chapter 11
e States that hate the Union-mean to destroy the Union, were resolved to make war on the Union-had been willing to depart peaceably, and to arrange quietly and decently the terms of separation, we alone among the people of the free States expressed a willingness to let them go. But they would not go in that way. They set themselves to stealing arsenals, fortifications, and custom-houses, that were the property of the Nation. From that hour it has never been possible to let them go. On August 6th the Tribune declared: The only hope of the South, did they but know it, is in their defeat. For the North, defeat, even though only the qualified disaster that comes through compromise and diplomacy, is remediless destruction preceded by years of the bitterest shame, and this we must acknowledge without shrinking, avoid with the forethought of the wise, strive against with the valor of the brave. That the first of the above paragraphs is Greeley's, and the last Dana's, is eviden
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