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o my surprise I find that Judge Scates Adjutant--general of the Thirteenth corps, a distinguished lawyer and ex-judge of Illinois. keeps the accounts of his office with the adjutant-general here in excellent order — not quite so perfect, indeed, as those of the Army of the Potomac, with its unequalled adjutant, General Seth Williams, of the regular army. but yet altogether satisfactory. A charge against the High Dominie Dudgeon was squelched the other day.... I hastened to say that Michael was a splendid old fighter, with only two grains of discretion, and this must be a blunder and nothing worse. Anyway it's laid to sleep. This refers to General M. K. Lawler, than whom there never was a more honest or capable soldier in the volunteer army. I am off for Burnside this P. M., and then to Rosecrans. As soon as it became certain that Rosecrans, in obedience to the official pressure which had been put upon him, was actually moving against Bragg, the secretary decided
J. P. Drouillard (search for this): chapter 17
ly to point out the fact that Dana, who happened to be behind the divisions of Davis and Sheridan, which had just been placed in line to fill the gap made by the withdrawal of Wood, was swept away in the debacle which followed the first successful onrush of the Confederate columns, and as soon as he could disentangle himself rode rapidly to Chattanooga. It must be added that Rosecrans, McCook, Crittenden, Sheridan, Davis, Van Cleve, and many staff-officers, including Horace Porter and J. P. Drouillard, were also borne irresistibly to the rear by the troops who had fled in what Dana designates as wholesale panic. Dana to Stanton, Chattanooga, September 20th. These officers, with only one exception, were regulars, with two West-Pointers of approved experience and unimpeachable valor. Had they known or even supposed that the left and left centre would hold fast they would surely have stayed on the field till the battle was over. They did the very best they could with the light they
U. S. Grant (search for this): chapter 17
emed to forget with him that the paper work of Grant's army, with its many detachments and the grealed by the best available man, he wrote to General Grant, suggesting Major Samuel Breck, one of theer department commander could get him, but General Grant is pretty omnipotent just now. Breck is a e colors the men Pemberton had surrendered and Grant had paroled at Vicksburg. No word of this hadscattered; shortly after the fall of Vicksburg Grant himself had gone to New Orleans, while Sherman it, were the orders which finally transferred Grant himself to that theatre of operations, consolid September 30th, the Secretary of War ordered Grant to Cairo by telegraph for conference. This wime was lost in complying with its terms. General Grant and his entire headquarters started at 11 retary himself was the officer who was to meet Grant, and the first meeting between these distinguiinued conference, the result of which was that Grant was placed in command of the Military Division[17 more...]
Longstreet (search for this): chapter 17
their real plans with skill. They had sent Longstreet with a formidable corps of veteran infantry wn his efforts. Bragg, of course, knew that Longstreet was near at hand, but Rosecrans was apparenton, had been considered, but that no part of Longstreet's corps had yet been received at Lafayette, adquarters were still without information of Longstreet's arrival. The next day reports were receivtain. Enemy silenced on nearly whole line. Longstreet is here. At 5.20 P. M.: Firing hasdistances to be passed over to that flank by Longstreet, coming in from the Atlanta Railroad, were aster which followed the sustained attack of Longstreet against Rosecrans's right was first made knon the great battle was the timely arrival of Longstreet's corps from the East, and the decisive partline at Chickamauga arrested the progress of Longstreet and saved the Union army from ruin. Dana dining he had reported for the first time that Longstreet was certainly there. Two hours and a half l[6 more...]
stly regarded as a great victory it was marred by the escape of the Confederate army across the Potomac into Virginia. Notwithstanding the necessity of repeating his story and of attending to such other business as pressed upon him, Dana found time to write to me in his own hand from the War Department, July 21, 1863. As this letter has never been published elsewhere, I give it in part as follows: I got here very safely, and find everybody in distress because Meade failed to capture Lee. There can be no question that a vigorous attack, seasonably made, must have resulted in the surrender of his entire army. Meade was anxious to make it, but his four principal corps commanders, Sykes, Sedgwick, Slocum, and French, all his seniors in rank, were so determinedly opposed to it, while the only one who strongly urged it, Wadsworth, was only a temporary corps commander and a volunteer to boot, that he yielded and let the critical opportunity go by. The President wrote him a letter
William T. Sherman (search for this): chapter 17
r further service. He wrote to me from the War Department, August 11, 1863. Omitting purely personal matters, I quote as follows: You speak with regret of Sherman's retreat from Pearl River. I had the same feeling at first, but on reflection have come to doubt the possibility of pursuing Johnston to the Tombigbee with adeqhe difficulty in both cases is that the law limits the number of major-generals and that the list is now complete. Perhaps you have already learned that both General Sherman and General McPherson have been appointed brigadiers in the regular army. Prime is at the home of his family on Long Island. Still very feeble. I am sot it was too late to meet the emergency. Grant's troops were too much scattered; shortly after the fall of Vicksburg Grant himself had gone to New Orleans, while Sherman, with the bulk of the army, had been frittering his time and strength away in central Mississippi. The government at Washington had been clearly out-generaled by
pressed upon him, Dana found time to write to me in his own hand from the War Department, July 21, 1863. As this letter has never been published elsewhere, I give it in part as follows: I got here very safely, and find everybody in distress because Meade failed to capture Lee. There can be no question that a vigorous attack, seasonably made, must have resulted in the surrender of his entire army. Meade was anxious to make it, but his four principal corps commanders, Sykes, Sedgwick, Slocum, and French, all his seniors in rank, were so determinedly opposed to it, while the only one who strongly urged it, Wadsworth, was only a temporary corps commander and a volunteer to boot, that he yielded and let the critical opportunity go by. The President wrote him a letter recommending such an attack, but it came too late, by some accident. The facts since discovered show that there was no possibility of our failure. ... There is no talk of removing General Meade or putting General G
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 17
duals in his composition, and with great love of command, he is a feeble commander. He is conscientious and honest, just as he is imperious and disputatious; always with a stray vein of caprice and an overweening passion for the approbation of his personal friends and the public outside. Under the present circumstances, I consider this army to be very unsafe in his hands, but know of no man except Thomas who could now be safely put in his place. That same afternoon Dana reported Jefferson Davis as being present with Bragg's army. On the 12th he asks Stanton if it would not be possible for General Halleck to come to Chattanooga, adding, What is needed to extricate this army is the highest administrative talent, and that without delay. After thirty-six hours of heavy rain, which had swollen the rivers and greatly injured the roads, he reported the country as denuded of forage and food, that the troops had been put on three-quarter rations, and that it was imperatively necessar
ct against interruption by the enemy, he reported that the appointment of Baldy Smith as chief engineer of the department infuses much energy and judgment into that branch of the operations ; that the department staff had been entirely reorganized, with Major-General Reynolds chief of staff, General Smith engineer, and General Brannan chief of artillery, and that the remarkable strength of the new staff cannot fail to add much to the discipline of the army. On October 8th he mentions General Rousseau as one who seems to be regarded throughout this army as an ass of eminent gifts --that the consolidation of the two corps was well received and must produce the most happy consequences --but to avoid the impression that the measure was intended as a token of disgrace and punishment, he recommended that an order should be issued from Washington complimenting the steadiness and gallantry of the men, and putting the consolidation on its true grounds. On the 11th he called attention to the
hty thousand (Bragg had sixty-seven thousand veterans and fifteen thousand militia) till darkness covered the field, and it saved everything for us. In this fight the men who most distinguished themselves were Generals Thomas, Granger, Steedman, Brannan, Palmer, Hazen, Turchin, and Colonel Harker. The last — named commanded a brigade which got out of ammunition, and at the end three times repulsed the columns of Longstreet with the bayonet. But they were all heroes, and we owe them a debt of Smith as chief engineer of the department infuses much energy and judgment into that branch of the operations ; that the department staff had been entirely reorganized, with Major-General Reynolds chief of staff, General Smith engineer, and General Brannan chief of artillery, and that the remarkable strength of the new staff cannot fail to add much to the discipline of the army. On October 8th he mentions General Rousseau as one who seems to be regarded throughout this army as an ass of emi
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