hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
U. S. Grant 914 0 Browse Search
Charles A. Dana 610 0 Browse Search
Charles Dana 426 0 Browse Search
Stanton Dana 362 0 Browse Search
Herr Dana 260 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley 209 1 Browse Search
John A. Rawlins 187 1 Browse Search
T. W. Sherman 157 1 Browse Search
United States (United States) 120 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant 111 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana. Search the whole document.

Found 493 total hits in 128 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...
give it in part as follows: I got here very safely, and find everybody in distress because Meade failed to capture Lee. There can be no question that a vigorous attack, seasonably made, must have resulted in the surrender of his entire army. Meade was anxious to make it, but his four principal corps commanders, Sykes, Sedgwick, Slocum, and French, all his seniors in rank, were so determinvered show that there was no possibility of our failure. ... There is no talk of removing General Meade or putting General Grant in command of the Army of the Potomac. I am going home to ConneGeneral Grant has made some recommendations for promotions to major-generalships, and so has General Meade. The difficulty in both cases is that the law limits the number of major-generals and that reinforce Bragg, The earliest notice of this movement received by the government was from General Meade, September 14, 1863. See Official Records, Serial No. 50, p. 35. and had gathered from Alab
Horace Porter (search for this): chapter 17
ngle himself rode rapidly to Chattanooga. It must be added that Rosecrans, McCook, Crittenden, Sheridan, Davis, Van Cleve, and many staff-officers, including Horace Porter and J. P. Drouillard, were also borne irresistibly to the rear by the troops who had fled in what Dana designates as wholesale panic. Dana to Stanton, Chattushing to the mind as that scene. I was swept away with part of Rosecrans's staff, and lost in the rabble. Some of these officers, and especially Brouillard and Porter, drew their swords and worked like good fellows trying to rally and reorganize the fugitives; but as often as they got a squad together a shell crashing through tic soldier. But I shall let my pen run on in a protracted scrawl which you will find it very difficult to read, I fear. I must tell you that I am charmed with Porter, and that some of us are trying to make him, or have him made, a colonel. As for the general condition of this army, I must write you another time. There is muc
George Washington (search for this): chapter 17
the tree-tops (for the battle was fought mainly in a forest), or a few canister-shots dropping on the dry leaves, would send the cowards packing again. I rode twelve miles to Chattanooga, galloping my horse all the way, to send despatches to Washington, and found the road filled all the distance with baggage-wagons, artillery, ambulances, negroes on horseback, field and company officers, wounded men limping along, Union refugees from the country around leading their wives and children, mules e Southwest. Dana's despatches to the secretary are conclusive on these points, but in addition they throw important light on the entire course of events both before and after the great battle. Not the least important report sent by him to Washington, September 21st, was the rumor that Ewell's corps from Virginia had also joined Bragg, too late to take part in the battle, that it was said to be now moving to the Tennessee River about Chattanooga. He evidently doubted this report, for in th
of veteran infantry from Virginia to reinforce Bragg, The earliest notice of this movement receiforces within supporting distance for defence, Bragg had also succeeded in concentrating all the fomore formidable. The mystery which surrounded Bragg's purposes was gradually dispelling itself, anoga in case victory should crown his efforts. Bragg, of course, knew that Longstreet was near at hfensive to the defensive, or that he suspected Bragg of an intention to fight an aggressive battle.king diversion on our right. . . An orderly of Bragg's just captured says there are reports in rebe right, but nothing had yet occurred to reveal Bragg's real plan of battle or where his heaviest atusand men waged there against eighty thousand (Bragg had sixty-seven thousand veterans and fifteen at Ewell's corps from Virginia had also joined Bragg, too late to take part in the battle, that it y had not concentrated all of its forces under Bragg, Dana's vigorous despatches had the immediate [10 more...]
James Harrison Wilson (search for this): chapter 17
Chapter 16: Dana returns to Washington Duty in War Department letters to Colonel Wilson Joins Rosecrans campaign and battle of Chickamauga despatches and letters from Chattanooga Grant ordered to Chattanooga Meets Stanton at Louisville Dana was the first man from Vicksburg to reach Washington, and although he was anxious to rejoin his family for a few days' rest, and was besought by his friends, George Opdyke, the merchant, and Mr. Ketchum, the banker, to go into business, at the earnest solicitation of Stanton he concluded to remain in the service of the War Department. He had been appointed assistant secretary during the Vicksburg campaign, but probably for the reason that Congress had not yet authorized a second assistant his name was not sent to the Senate for confirmation to that office till January 20, 1864. It should, however, be noted that it was acted on almost immediately. It will be remembered that the double victory of Vicksburg and Gettysburg mark
he corrected his earlier despatch and said the attack was on our left. There is [the] fighting. At 2.30 P. M.: The fight continues to rage; enemy repulsed on left by Thomas has suddenly fallen on right of our line of battle held by Van Cleve; musketry there fierce and obstinate .... Decisive victory seems assured to us. At 3 P. M.: Enemy forced back by Crittenden on right has just massed his artillery against Davis on centre. His attack there is the most serious of the dwas swept away in the debacle which followed the first successful onrush of the Confederate columns, and as soon as he could disentangle himself rode rapidly to Chattanooga. It must be added that Rosecrans, McCook, Crittenden, Sheridan, Davis, Van Cleve, and many staff-officers, including Horace Porter and J. P. Drouillard, were also borne irresistibly to the rear by the troops who had fled in what Dana designates as wholesale panic. Dana to Stanton, Chattanooga, September 20th. These offi
t finding that feasible he proceeded to join Rosecrans. Chattanooga was now the great objective of by the government at Richmond, and although Rosecrans had succeeded in concentrating all of his owtanton that Burnside's forces were needed by Rosecrans. At noon, September 18th, he reported the aess of the Union line was not yet apparent. Rosecrans, who was up bright and early, rode from one s that scene. I was swept away with part of Rosecrans's staff, and lost in the rabble. Some of thton was from the first in favor of relieving Rosecrans from the command of the Army of the Cumberla this mention was by a searching analysis of Rosecrans's character, and a conclusive demonstration ey were unquestionably right, and that Rosecrans, who is sometimes as obstinate and inaccessiChickamauga and Chattanooga were closed, General Rosecrans and his friends set up the claim that thhad been covered by the secretary's orders. Rosecrans had not only been relieved, but to prevent t[35 more...]
Theodore S. Bowers (search for this): chapter 17
wever, I was at Westport, sailing and swimming in Long Island Sound. The most enthusiastic imagination cannot exaggerate the delight of a few days spent in such recreations, nor the contrast with the infernal heat of this city. Pray let me hear from you as soon as you can, and keep me informed as to movements and improvements in the Army of the Tennessee. General Thayer was here yesterday seeking correction in the date of his commission — in vain. Remember me cordially to Rawlins and Bowers. Also to the general, who is, I trust, enduring with health and philosophy the climate of Vicksburg. Dana spent the remainder of that month in the performance of various duties connected with the administration and maintenance of the army, and especially with the supply departments and contractors whose place it, was to furnish what was required. With his wide acquaintance and his vigorous methods he found ready and constant occupation, by which he relieved the secretary of many harass
erything by fighting on the left under the lead of that magnificent old hero, General Thomas, and of Gordon Granger, the Marshal Ney of the war. It was a great fight which these twenty-five thousand men waged there against eighty thousand (Bragg had sixty-seven thousand veterans and fifteen thousand militia) till darkness covered the field, and it saved everything for us. In this fight the men who most distinguished themselves were Generals Thomas, Granger, Steedman, Brannan, Palmer, Hazen, Turchin, and Colonel Harker. The last — named commanded a brigade which got out of ammunition, and at the end three times repulsed the columns of Longstreet with the bayonet. But they were all heroes, and we owe them a debt of gratitude we can never sufficiently pay. They punished the enemy so awfully that if our forces had remained on the ground, it is the opinion of General Thomas, as well as of many others less judicious and reserved than he, that the enemy must have retreated. But Thomas wa
William F. Smith (search for this): chapter 17
at he may have had a vague purpose of that sort, they make it clear that he did not regard the emergency as nearly so great as it appeared to Dana, nor believe that the shorter line could be opened till Hooker's corps, detached from the Army of the Potomac on the 23d, should arrive at Bridgeport and occupy the country between there and Chattanooga. It is specially worthy of note that there is not a word in any of these despatches foreshadowing the plan which was actually devised by General William F. Smith, and successfully carried into effect under his supervision. While it is abundantly evident that Dana reported from time to time everything that came under his observation, it is also evident that he was really much more concerned with conditions as they actually existed than with the means of changing them, that he felt it to be a matter of much greater importance to get rid of the incapable Rosecrans and secure the appointment of a competent man to take his place than to report o
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...