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er a moment's conference with Rawlins, who had already begun to show his anger, I broke in with the remark: General Thomas, General Grant is wet, hungry, and in pain; his wagons and camp equipage are far behind; can you not find quarters and some dry clothes for him, and direct your officers to provide the party with supper? This suggestive question broke the spell and brought to Thomas's serious countenance a smile of cordiality which, although belated, was followed at once by orders to Willard, his senior aide-de-camp, for rooms, dry clothes, and supper. Conversation began, and it was not long till a glow of warmth and cheerfulness prevailed. Smith and Porter came in and were presented, and before the evening closed the casual observer would not have suspected that there had been the slightest lack of cordiality in the reception which had been accorded to the weary general and his staff. The foregoing incident was nevertheless an important one, and was followed by important
James Harrison Wilson (search for this): chapter 18
and 30th. at the cost of several hundred men killed, wounded, and prisoners. The next morning Dana and I rode with Grant and Thomas into Lookout Valley, where we met Hooker, Howard, and Geary. The meeting, as may well be imagined, deepened Grant's mistrust of Hooker, and resulted, as soon as he got back to headquarters, in a despatch from Dana to Stanton, dated that day, October 29, 1863-1 P. M., which runs as follows: General Grant desires me to request for him that Lieutenant-Colonel J. H. Wilson, of his staff, Captain of Engineers, be appointed Brigadier-General of Volunteers. Grant wants him to command cavalry, for which he possesses uncommon qualifications. Knowing Wilson thoroughly, I heartily indorse the application. Grant also wishes to have both Hooker and Slocum removed from his command, and the Eleventh and Twelfth Corps consolidated under Howard. He would himself order Hooker and Slocum away, but hesitates because they have just been sent here by the Pres
Longstreet (search for this): chapter 18
ing of the 14th we started on our return trip, and, riding around the head of Longstreet's column, reached Chattanooga without accident or delay by the night of the 1g columns of the enemy, and might easily, in the presence of such a leader as Longstreet, have ended in the capture of Burnside and his whole force, we united in earnsionary Ridge towards Resaca and Atlanta, thus separating him hopelessly from Longstreet and rendering effective co-operation between them henceforth impossible. But Longstreet had shut Burnside up and was closely besieging him in Knoxville. The emergency was a pressing one, and in designating Granger to command the relieving cchurz. As we travelled rapidly, Dana's horse gave out the second day, and as Longstreet's command had swept the country clear of everything fit for a remount, I aske been overwhelmingly defeated at Missionary Ridge and thwarted at Knoxville. Longstreet had begun his toilsome march back to Virginia. Dana, as has been seen, had e
ttanooga Dana guides Grant and staff Thomas's relations to Grant through Lookout Valley ly hungry. Although they had been taken in at Thomas's headquarters, they were not expected, and stcond in command, was really in disfavor, while Thomas, who belonged to another army, had been put inarly all of Grant's troops. But back of that, Thomas's services and connections with the old army h confidence in the other as in himself. While Thomas was far too lofty a man to criticise his commathat Grant had more confidence in Thomas than Thomas had in Grant, and that the incident in questiog which was perhaps unconscious on the part of Thomas, that in the command of the Army of the Cumberhe next morning Dana and I rode with Grant and Thomas into Lookout Valley, where we met Hooker, Howahad come, and an hour later positively ordered Thomas to make a diversion from his front in Sheridanin the reformation of another, of whose habits Thomas had complained, but who was really a first-cla[16 more...]
Carl Schurz (search for this): chapter 18
Dana guides Grant and staff Thomas's relations to Grant through Lookout Valley Dana in the field Missionary Ridge expedition to Knoxville Dana and Carl Schurz return to Washington General Grant had hardly arrived at Stevenson on the afternoon of October 21, 1863, when he was met by an officer bearing an invitation stop at Knoxville, Dana and I concluded to return to Chattanooga by the route we had just marched over, and on the way down had the company of Generals Blair and Schurz. As we travelled rapidly, Dana's horse gave out the second day, and as Longstreet's command had swept the country clear of everything fit for a remount, I asked way of explanation, with a suggestive twinkle of the eye, It belongs to Herr Dana, the Assistant Secretary of War. During this long but pleasant ride Dana and Schurz beguiled the journey with conversations in German and English, which gave each a high opinion of the other's skill in languages, as previously related. Dana an
eving troops, and at the same time added enough to them to make the column irresistible. As operations had ceased elsewhere, Dana was, as usual, glad to go, and overtook Sherman at Charleston, on the Hiwassee River, two days from Chattanooga. Thenceforth we were constantly with the advance-guard, doing all in our power to hurry the march. Our route traversed Athens, Philadelphia, Morgantown, and Marysville, all the way through a beautiful country, well supplied with cattle and provisions. Long's cavalry reached Knoxville at 3 A. M., December 4th, but we were delayed till late the next afternoon. Meanwhile the enemy, after suffering a bloody repulse on the 29th, had raised the siege and marched away to the north the next day. He had, of course, been advised of Sherman's coming, but as the relieving march was necessarily slow, he had ample start to make it difficult, if not impossible, to overtake him. In addition to taking an active part in all the operations, Dana, by his despa
T. W. Sherman (search for this): chapter 18
and as reported by Dana at the time, was that Sherman's forces should advance from Bridgeport throue Tennessee, upon which at the appointed time Sherman's troops should cross to the south bank; thatof the river, cross Citico Creek, and join in Sherman's movement, and that Thomas, holding the cent never dissolved by any effort on the part of Sherman or Howard. It was thought at the time, and was afterwards claimed in the reports of both Sherman and Grant, that Sherman's movement had been me Bragg was moving troops to his right against Sherman, and it was to prevent an overwhelming concenn orders for a vigorous attack at daybreak by Sherman on the left, and Granger [commanding a corps battle. It is to be specially noted that Sherman's attack was neither delivered on time nor wa failing to move with celerity, Grant ordered Sherman, a day or two later, to take command of the r Dana was, as usual, glad to go, and overtook Sherman at Charleston, on the Hiwassee River, two day[7 more...]
Stanton Dana (search for this): chapter 18
Grant and staff taking the longer route, while Dana and I, after baiting our horses, climbed Waldenhad been done to relieve their discomfort, when Dana and I arrived on the scene. Grant was sitting of operations for shortening the cracker line. Dana's work for the rest of the campaign was of secoed, wounded, and prisoners. The next morning Dana and I rode with Grant and Thomas into Lookout Vdeadly antagonist. For the light it threw on Dana's own characteristics, this ride into east Tennnd myself that it produced the same effect upon Dana. With these facts well in mind, it is easy to themselves to undertake impossibilities. As Dana was personally present with the generals in freesistible. As operations had ceased elsewhere, Dana was, as usual, glad to go, and overtook Shermanrything fit for a remount, I asked Blair to let Dana have a led horse of his till another could be g false wall and the rear end of the stable, and Dana proposed to go back for that, but the distance [43 more...]
Horace Porter (search for this): chapter 18
. Dana was known to the guard, who set us across the river without delay. Tie was also familiar with the streets of the town and guided our party quickly to Captain Porter's quarters, where we arrived shortly before midnight. Although we were not expected, we were received with true military hospitality. Our host gave us the behis senior aide-de-camp, for rooms, dry clothes, and supper. Conversation began, and it was not long till a glow of warmth and cheerfulness prevailed. Smith and Porter came in and were presented, and before the evening closed the casual observer would not have suspected that there had been the slightest lack of cordiality in theto headquarters several days later. It was then communicated to me by Rawlins and Dana in response to the appeal I was making at the time to secure promotion for Porter. My promotion, to take effect from the date of its recommendation, came in due time, but, for reasons which I never ascertained, Grant's request for the removal
ad Hazen, who was in command at the bridge-head, but Grant sent no further orders, and Hooker did not move. The temptation was too great for the enemy, and the consequence was the bloody affair of Wauhatchie, which took place between midnight and four o'clock next morning, Dana to Stanton, October 29th and 30th. at the cost of several hundred men killed, wounded, and prisoners. The next morning Dana and I rode with Grant and Thomas into Lookout Valley, where we met Hooker, Howard, and Geary. The meeting, as may well be imagined, deepened Grant's mistrust of Hooker, and resulted, as soon as he got back to headquarters, in a despatch from Dana to Stanton, dated that day, October 29, 1863-1 P. M., which runs as follows: General Grant desires me to request for him that Lieutenant-Colonel J. H. Wilson, of his staff, Captain of Engineers, be appointed Brigadier-General of Volunteers. Grant wants him to command cavalry, for which he possesses uncommon qualifications. Knowing
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