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England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 24
f President letters and editorials Nominates Greeley for the cabinet favors expulsion of French from Mexico holds great Britain responsible for Alabama claims commends initial policy of Grant's administration Opposes creation of New department numbers of the paper Dana took strong ground in favor of the United States protecting all of its citizens as well as Great Britain protects hers. The occasion was the arrest of George Francis Train, an eccentric but harmless citizen, as a Fenian, ses of the United States, they would go without waiting for an appeal to arms. He also favored the policy of holding Great Britain to a rigid accountability for the damage done to American shipping by the Confederate cruisers which had been built, ail from English sea-ports. On these two great questions Dana was emphatically an American. He affected no love for Great Britain, and the letters he wrote from Paris in 1848, and the editorials he afterwards published in the Tribune, show that he
Cuba (Cuba) (search for this): chapter 24
ition of minister to England, which has always been justly regarded as the most important post connected with the diplomatic service of the United States. It will be recalled that although a rebellion against the dominion of Spain broke out in Cuba in 1868, it for some time attracted but little attention in the United States. Dana was one of the first American editors to recognize the justice of the outbreak, and to express his sympathy for the Cuban people. In doing so he took occasion to say, September 29, 1868: The natural tendency of all the countries lying round the United States is to gravitate towards our system, and finally to become parts of it. To this rule Cuba forms no exception. It is needless to call attention to the fact that this is the doctrine of Manifest Destiny, or Continental Union, which Dana, from that time, never lost an opportunity to promote. His sympathy for the Cubans throughout both their wars for independence was open and earnest. His fir
ally desired to see him ousted. It was felt that it would bring peace where there is now doubt and discord, and that it would tend powerfully to the speedy restoration of the Union and the revival of industry and business. We may even say that the world expected his conviction. It was the first time that the supreme executive officer of a nation had been brought before a tribunal, established by the people, for regular trial, and for peaceful deposition from office in case of conviction. Europe looked on with awe at this novel proceeding. Of course it was not supposed in these monarchical countries that any other result than the removal of the obnoxious executive could possibly follow. Notwithstanding all this, the trial has ended in acquittal. Mr. Johnson still exercises all the powers of his great office. In spite of party feeling and party pressure, there are seven Republican senators who have said, on their oaths, that the evidence and the law would not justify his convi
West Indies (search for this): chapter 24
he Cuban patriots soon recognized and ever afterwards held him to be the best and foremost friend they had in the United States. It should also be said that Dana at first opposed and then, after seeing the treaty which Seward had negotiated for that purpose, favored the acquisition of the Danish island of St. Thomas. About the same time he advocated the annexation of both Haiti and Santo Domingo on fair and honorable terms, as the best means then feasible of making our position in the West Indies secure. In order to relieve Grant's administration from embarrassment, he favored the repeal of the tenure of office act, which, it will be remembered, was passed for the restraint of President Johnson, and advocated the early adoption of the Fifteenth Amendment of the Constitution, which provides that the right of suffrage shall not be abridged by the United States, nor by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude. In local matters Dana took grounds aga
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
year, 1868, that Dana entered into a contract with Gurdon Bill & Co., of Springfield, Massachusetts, for a Life of General Grant, to be prepared mainly by me, edited by Dana, and published over our joint names. The Life of Ulysses S. Grant, General of the Armies of the United States. By Charles A. Dana, late Assistant Secretary of War, and James H. Wilson, Brevet Major-General, U. S. A. Gurdon Bill & Co., Springfield, Massachusetts; H. C. Johnson & Co., Cincinnati, Ohio; Charles Bill, Chicago, Illinois. Pp. 431. 1868. The work was limited to one volume, octavo, and was written and printed within three months. It was issued in ample time to assist in the election of General Grant to his first term as president. Indeed, that was its principal purpose, and while Dana wrote only three chapters — the thirty-sixth, thirty-eighth, and thirty-ninth--he read, approved, and passed all the rest, rarely ever changing the text in the slightest degree. It is also worthy of note that he never aft
Galena (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
e sincere friends of liberty, and that hands off is the true doctrine in a republic towards the government on all subjects which can be managed by individual enterprise. These ideas received additional support from the utterances of E. B. Washburne, who, as the representative from Grant's home district, was regarded as the spokesman of the new administration, both in and out of Congress. On the strength of his speeches, as well as on account of a notable one delivered by General Rawlins at Galena, their common home, the Sun inferred that the cardinal measures of Grant's policy would be rigid economy, searching retrenchment, strict accountability on the part of every office-holder, especially on the part of those charged with the collection and disbursement of the public moneys, the supremacy of the laws, and their rigid enforcement in every branch of the government and in every section of the Union. In the belief that the operations of the Federal government should be minimized ra
Dominican Republic (Dominican Republic) (search for this): chapter 24
ial policy of Grant's administration Opposes creation of New departments of government Approves general amnesty Recommends Greeley for Grant's cabinet or minister to England manifest Destiny or Continental Union annexation of Haiti and Santo Domingo repeal of tenure of office act arrest of Samuel Bowles Dana closed the contract for the control of the New York Sun late in December, 1867, or early in January, 1868, for himself and his associates, among whom were such distinguished men be said that Dana at first opposed and then, after seeing the treaty which Seward had negotiated for that purpose, favored the acquisition of the Danish island of St. Thomas. About the same time he advocated the annexation of both Haiti and Santo Domingo on fair and honorable terms, as the best means then feasible of making our position in the West Indies secure. In order to relieve Grant's administration from embarrassment, he favored the repeal of the tenure of office act, which, it will b
Department de Ville de Paris (France) (search for this): chapter 24
and felt confident that, as soon as they knew the purposes of the United States, they would go without waiting for an appeal to arms. He also favored the policy of holding Great Britain to a rigid accountability for the damage done to American shipping by the Confederate cruisers which had been built, fitted out, and permitted to sail from English sea-ports. On these two great questions Dana was emphatically an American. He affected no love for Great Britain, and the letters he wrote from Paris in 1848, and the editorials he afterwards published in the Tribune, show that he had less for Louis Napoleon, and no confidence whatever in the stability of his dynasty. Long before our own troubles culminated he wrote: No one can predict when the great edifice of fraud, violence, plunder, political pretence, and incapacity which constitutes the Second Empire will come to an end. The result is certain; the time and the mode depend upon accident. But we know that Louis Napoleon has ou
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
ountry. It was in March of this year, 1868, that Dana entered into a contract with Gurdon Bill & Co., of Springfield, Massachusetts, for a Life of General Grant, to be prepared mainly by me, edited by Dana, and published over our joint names. The Life of Ulysses S. Grant, General of the Armies of the United States. By Charles A. Dana, late Assistant Secretary of War, and James H. Wilson, Brevet Major-General, U. S. A. Gurdon Bill & Co., Springfield, Massachusetts; H. C. Johnson & Co., Cincinnati, Ohio; Charles Bill, Chicago, Illinois. Pp. 431. 1868. The work was limited to one volume, octavo, and was written and printed within three months. It was issued in ample time to assist in the election of General Grant to his first term as president. Indeed, that was its principal purpose, and while Dana wrote only three chapters — the thirty-sixth, thirty-eighth, and thirty-ninth--he read, approved, and passed all the rest, rarely ever changing the text in the slightest degree. It is also
Haiti (Haiti) (search for this): chapter 24
commends initial policy of Grant's administration Opposes creation of New departments of government Approves general amnesty Recommends Greeley for Grant's cabinet or minister to England manifest Destiny or Continental Union annexation of Haiti and Santo Domingo repeal of tenure of office act arrest of Samuel Bowles Dana closed the contract for the control of the New York Sun late in December, 1867, or early in January, 1868, for himself and his associates, among whom were such disIt should also be said that Dana at first opposed and then, after seeing the treaty which Seward had negotiated for that purpose, favored the acquisition of the Danish island of St. Thomas. About the same time he advocated the annexation of both Haiti and Santo Domingo on fair and honorable terms, as the best means then feasible of making our position in the West Indies secure. In order to relieve Grant's administration from embarrassment, he favored the repeal of the tenure of office act, wh
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