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Browsing named entities in William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune.

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a sort of duty for educated men to have on hand a lecture or two which they were willing to read to any audience which was willing to ask them. Hale's Lowell and his friends. Emerson wrote to a friend in 1843, There is now a lyceum, so called, in almost every town in New England, and if I would accept an invitation I might read a lecture every night. But all lecturers were not expected to contribute their wisdom or entertainment without compensation. It was said in the early fifties that Zzz Ik Marvel, from the delivery of one not very good lecture, could secure money enough to support himself while he was writing a really good book, and that one course of Bayard Taylor's lectures brought him profit enough to pay his way ten times around the world. Greeley always loved to talk, and the lecture-field was a tempting one to him. In later years it used to be said in the office that the only way he could be induced to take a vacation was to start him off on a lecturing tour. His
t reform sentiment of the movement. The real explanation of the Blair-Brown scheme in favor of Greeley is rather to be sought in the long-time political enmity of the Blair and Adams families. When the balloting began, only vague rumors of the Brown program had reached a majority of the delegates, and very many of them were ignorant of the light in which it was regarded by their chairman. The first ballot resulted as follows: Greeley147 Brown95 Adams205 Curtin62 Trumbull110 Chase2ZZZ Davis922 This vote aroused the enthusiasm of the Adams supporters, but evidence of the Brown-Greeley deal was supplied at once. As soon as the result was announced the chairman, reading from a slip of paper which he held in his hand, informed the convention that a gentleman who had just received a large number of votes desired to make a communication, and Governor Brown ascended the platform. In his remarks he not only stated his own withdrawal, but urged the nomination of Greeley.
ceding February; tall, slender, pale, and plain; with ten dollars in my pocket, summer clothing worth perhaps as much more, nearly all on my back, and a decent knowledge of so much of the art of printing as a boy will usually learn in the office of a country newspaper. The Greeleys, for generations back, had not known affluence. Of Scotch-Irish stock, some of them had emigrated to America as early as 1640, and had fought the fight for a living as farmers or as blacksmiths. Horace's father Zaccheus was a farmer, and the future journalist was born on his farm of fifty acres five miles from Amherst, N. H., on February 3, 1811. With the best of management it would have been difficult to obtain from such a farm more than a living for the owner's family. The Greeleys did work hard, the mother sharing with her husband such labor as raking and loading hay, besides doing housework and carding and spinning, and Horace, when five years old, gave such assistance as riding the horse to plow
Silas Wright (search for this): chapter 4
o Greeley their first meeting the Jeffersonian and the Log Cabin their character and features Greeley's industry poor business management last of the New Yorker Up in Albany another man who was at that time editing a newspaper had a fight on his hands, not so desperately against overdue notes as against a most powerful political opposition. That man was Thurlow Weed, and his opposition, known as The Albany Regency, included such leaders as Martin Van Buren, William L. Marcy, and Silas Wright. Weed had founded the Albany Evening Journal in March, 1830, and for several years had not only written all its editorial articles, but had reported the legislative proceedings, selected the miscellany, collected the local news, read the proofs, and sometimes made up the forms for the press. His fight in the first presidential campaign after his paper was founded (in 1832) ended in the loss of the State and the nation by his candidate, Henry Clay, and Marcy defeated Seward for Governor
Silas Wright (search for this): chapter 9
demanded, or that he should come to believe that a public office would add to his popular repute. But most of the big men in politics in those days did receive political rewards. Weed, it is true, was content to pull the wires --accepting only the position of State Printer; but Seward had been Governor and was a United States Senator; Greeley had helped elect scores of men to Congress and to the Legislature, and in the opposition party in his own State he had seen Van Buren, Marcy, and Silas Wright honored with one important office after another. So he came to feel that he was left neglected in his editorial room, and in 1854 he approached Weed with the query whether the time and circumstances were not favorable for his nomination for Governor. The Tribune had for some years been advocating the adoption of the Maine prohibition law in New York State, As a city excise measure Greeley proposed in 1844 to abolish all license fees, and assess on the sellers of liquor, retail and wh
Fanny Wright (search for this): chapter 6
we are to be considered the enemies of improvement, and the bulwarks of an outgrown aristocracy in this country. In a letter to R. W. Griswold, Greeley said: I do not regard either office or money as a supreme good; and, though I never had either, I have been so near to each as to see what they are worth, very nearly. I regard principle and self-respect as more important than either. When the Courier and Enquirer, in April, 1844, spoke of the Tribune as the organ of Charles Fourier, Fanny Wright, and R. D. Owen, advocating from day to day the destruction of our existing social system, and substituting in its stead one based upon infidelity, and an unrestricted and indiscriminate intercourse of the sexes, the Tribune began its reply, We do not copy the above with a view to defend ourselves from the cowardly falsehoods of the escaped State-prison bird, etc. As late as February 10, 1848, replying to some criticisms in the Herald and the Observer, the Tribune said: Should the Tribun
Fernando Wood (search for this): chapter 9
inst Great Britain was justified by the consent of the governed clause of the Declaration of Independence, that clause would justify the secession of five million of Southrons from the Federal Union in 1861. Jefferson's principle might be pushed to extreme and baleful consequences ; but, while he would not uphold the secession of Governor's Island from New York, if seven or eight contiguous States should secede from the Union he would not think it right to stand up for coercion. If Mayor Fernando Wood had not had free trade in view, Greeley might have joined him in his suggestion to the Common Council of New York city on January 6, 1861, that, if the Union, which, he held, could not be constitutionally kept together by force, was dissolved, the city should separate from the State and establish a Free city, which would have cheap goods nearly free from duty. A week later he declared that, if any six or more of the cotton States wanted to secede, we will do our best to help them out
Fernando Wood (search for this): chapter 11
Webb, James Watson, on Greeley's dress, 11. Webster, Daniel, on Texas question, 138, 139, 141 ; 7th of March speech, 153-158. Weed, Thurlow, founding of the Albany Journal, 40; first meeting with Greeley, 42; the Jeffersonian, 43; Weed and Greeley contrasted, 44, 46; Clay's defeat in 1837, 45; discovery of Greeley, 46; Greeley's independence of, 78; on Greeley's proposed nomination for Governor, 172; Greeley's complaints to Seward, 173-176; Seward's letter to, 177; on Greeley's letter to Seward, 182; defeats Greeley's chances for office, 182. Whig (daily newspaper), 47. Whig party, 1836 to 1840, 41-52; final defeat of, 163. White, Horace, on New York banking laws, 35; reports Liberal Republican platform, 239. Wilmot proviso, Greeley on, 158, 159. Wilson, Henry, on Greeley, 166,187. Winchester, Jonas, 26. Women's suffrage, Greeley on, 89. Wood, Fernando, proposed secession of New York city, 185. Y. Young, John Russell, on Grant's administration, 214.
Jonas Winchester (search for this): chapter 3
rgan, but was a contributor to it, one of his articles being a defense of lotteries when an outcry arose against them because of the suicide of a young man who had lost all his property in tickets. When his assistance was not required in his own shop, Greeley would work as a substitute compositor in a newspaper office near by, and he was making fair if slow progress in the world, when, in July, 1833, Story was drowned while bathing in the East River. His place in the firm was taken by Jonas Winchester, and the business continued so prosperously that in 1834 Greeley had the courage to think seriously of starting a newspaper of which he should be the editor. That he had made something of a mark in the local newspaper world is shown by the fact that he was at this time invited by James Gordon Bennett to become interested with him in starting a daily paper to be called the New York Herald. This offer was declined, but the idea of a paper of his own was carried out, and on March 22, 18
Jonas Winchester (search for this): chapter 11
Webb, James Watson, on Greeley's dress, 11. Webster, Daniel, on Texas question, 138, 139, 141 ; 7th of March speech, 153-158. Weed, Thurlow, founding of the Albany Journal, 40; first meeting with Greeley, 42; the Jeffersonian, 43; Weed and Greeley contrasted, 44, 46; Clay's defeat in 1837, 45; discovery of Greeley, 46; Greeley's independence of, 78; on Greeley's proposed nomination for Governor, 172; Greeley's complaints to Seward, 173-176; Seward's letter to, 177; on Greeley's letter to Seward, 182; defeats Greeley's chances for office, 182. Whig (daily newspaper), 47. Whig party, 1836 to 1840, 41-52; final defeat of, 163. White, Horace, on New York banking laws, 35; reports Liberal Republican platform, 239. Wilmot proviso, Greeley on, 158, 159. Wilson, Henry, on Greeley, 166,187. Winchester, Jonas, 26. Women's suffrage, Greeley on, 89. Wood, Fernando, proposed secession of New York city, 185. Y. Young, John Russell, on Grant's administration, 214.
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