hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Horace Greeley 888 2 Browse Search
Thurlow Weed 134 0 Browse Search
Zacheus Greeley 124 0 Browse Search
Henry Clay 120 0 Browse Search
William H. Seward 106 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 76 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 68 0 Browse Search
Nicolay-Hay Lincoln 64 0 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 62 0 Browse Search
Charles Francis Adams 60 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune.

Found 2,930 total hits in 982 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Horace Greeley (search for this): chapter 1
Preface Horace Greeley is remembered by the men of his own day as a great editor and a somewhat eccentric genius. While we like to hear about a man's personal characteristics, in studying his biography the lessons of a life like Greeley's are to be found in his works. When a gawky country lad, with a limited education andn's career there must be material for useful study. And the place to study Horace Greeley is in his newspapers. He made these newspapers; he gave them their charactar-reaching results. This is especially true of the slavery question; because Greeley was not an early Abolitionist-not an Abolitionist at all, in the technical sendence; what wonder, too, if it should have thrown off his balance a man like Mr. Greeley, whose head was not strong, whose education was imperfect, and whose self-coce had been fortified by a brave and successful struggle with adversity. Of Greeley's honesty and purity of motive there was never any question. In his days of
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1
graphy the lessons of a life like Greeley's are to be found in his works. When a gawky country lad, with a limited education and a slight acquaintance with the printer's trade, comes to the principal city of the land with a few dollars in his pocket and a single suit of clothes, and fights a fight the result of which is the founding of the most influential newspaper of his day, and the acquirement of a reputation as its editor which secures for him a nomination for the presidency of the United States-in such a man's career there must be material for useful study. And the place to study Horace Greeley is in his newspapers. He made these newspapers; he gave them their character; and, in doing so, he left on them his mental photograph. Such a study is most interesting. No other editor has ever given opportunity for it. Beginning his editorial labors when both the tariff and the slavery questions were quiescent, we find in the files of the New Yorker, the Jeffersonian, the Log Cabi
ceedings and other matters demonstrated his skill as a reporter, and his close supervision of all the columns of the Tribune was made plain in the correspondence with his managing editor, Charles A. Dana, published after his death. He always felt a responsibility for the kind of journal that he gave to his subscribers. I think that newspaper reading is worth all the schools in the country, he told a committee of the House of Commons, of which Cobden was a member, when invited, in London in 1851, to give his views on taxes on knowledge, and he was too honest to offer his readers anything less than the best that he could supply. Some advice to a country editor, written by him in 1860, could hardly be improved upon. His first principle laid down was that the subject of deepest interest to an average human being is himself; next to that, he is most concerned about his neighbor. He therefore told his correspondent that, if he would make up at least half his paper of local news, secure
ad, at his own expense, to Phillips Academy at Exeter, and afterward to college. Some men, after going through such struggles as Greeley encountered, would have regretted in later years the loss of this opportunity. Greeley did not. On the contrary, he expressed his thanks that his parents did not let him be indebted to any one of whom he had not a right to expect such a favor, and he was ever hostile to the education furnished by the colleges of the day. To a young man who wrote to him in 1852 for his advice about going to college, Greeley replied, I think you might better be learning to fiddle, and in his Busy Life (1868) he said he would reply to the question, How shall I obtain an education, by saying, Learn a trade of a good master. I hold firmly that most boys may better acquire the knowledge they need than by spending four years in college. In an address at the laying of the corner-stone of the People's College at Havana, N. Y., in 1858, he explained, however, that he did n
led a good-sized town. The population of Manhattan Island (below the Harlem River) was only 202,589 in 1830, as compared with the 1,850,093 shown by the census of 1900; the total population of the district now embraced in Greater New York was then only 242,278, while in 1900 it was 3,437,202. The total assessed valuation of the 1900 it was 3,437,202. The total assessed valuation of the city, real and personal, in 1833, was only $166,491,542; in 1900 it was, for the Borough of Manhattan, $2,853,363,382. No railroad then landed passengers or freight in the city, no ocean steamers departed from the docks, and there was no telegraphic communication. Thirteenth Street marked the northern boundary of the settled part1900 it was, for the Borough of Manhattan, $2,853,363,382. No railroad then landed passengers or freight in the city, no ocean steamers departed from the docks, and there was no telegraphic communication. Thirteenth Street marked the northern boundary of the settled part of Manhattan Island, and although, in 1828, lots from two to six miles distant from the City Hall were valued at from only $60 to $700 each, more than one writer of the day was ready to concede that, owing to advantages of cheaper land on the opposite shores of Long Island and New Jersey, newcomers were likely to settle there be
reeley encountered, would have regretted in later years the loss of this opportunity. Greeley did not. On the contrary, he expressed his thanks that his parents did not let him be indebted to any one of whom he had not a right to expect such a favor, and he was ever hostile to the education furnished by the colleges of the day. To a young man who wrote to him in 1852 for his advice about going to college, Greeley replied, I think you might better be learning to fiddle, and in his Busy Life (1868) he said he would reply to the question, How shall I obtain an education, by saying, Learn a trade of a good master. I hold firmly that most boys may better acquire the knowledge they need than by spending four years in college. In an address at the laying of the corner-stone of the People's College at Havana, N. Y., in 1858, he explained, however, that he did not denounce a classical course of study, but only protested against the requirement of application to and proficiency in the dead l
les A. Dana, published after his death. He always felt a responsibility for the kind of journal that he gave to his subscribers. I think that newspaper reading is worth all the schools in the country, he told a committee of the House of Commons, of which Cobden was a member, when invited, in London in 1851, to give his views on taxes on knowledge, and he was too honest to offer his readers anything less than the best that he could supply. Some advice to a country editor, written by him in 1860, could hardly be improved upon. His first principle laid down was that the subject of deepest interest to an average human being is himself; next to that, he is most concerned about his neighbor. He therefore told his correspondent that, if he would make up at least half his paper of local news, secured by a wide-awake, judicious correspondent in every village and township in your county, nobody in the county can long do without it. Make your paper a perfect mirror of everything done in you
ment as a compositor New York city in 1831 Parentage and farm life his schooling opinions of a college education apprenticeship in Vermont appearance and dress views of country journalism amusements a nonuser of tobacco and liquor arrival in New York city The country lad who went to New York city in the summer of 1831 to seek his fortune, arrived in what would now be called a good-sized town. The population of Manhattan Island (below the Harlem River) was only 202,589 in 1830, as compared with the 1,850,093 shown by the census of 1900; the total population of the district now embraced in Greater New York was then only 242,278, while in 1900 it was 3,437,202. The total assessed valuation of the city, real and personal, in 1833, was only $166,491,542; in 1900 it was, for the Borough of Manhattan, $2,853,363,382. No railroad then landed passengers or freight in the city, no ocean steamers departed from the docks, and there was no telegraphic communication. Thirteen
gland, and Zaccheus Greeley was never behind his neighbors in acts of hospitality. He was, his son has testified, a bad manager, and always in debt, and his farm did not enable him to gain on his indebtedness. In the hope of improving matters, he let his own farm to a younger brother and rented a larger one near by. But the brother could not meet his engagements, and the family moved back in 1819. Sickness ensued, a speculation in lumber proved disastrous, and the end came in the summer of 1820, when the home farm was seized by the sheriff at the instance of several creditors, the father took his departure to escape arrest for debt, and the farm and crops, when sold, left nothing for the wife and children. When night fell, wrote the son in later years, we were as bankrupt a family as well could be. Horace then had a brother, eight years old, and two sisters of six and four years; another sister was born in 1822. In the following January the Greeleys, with their effects packed i
ne, Greeley printed a report of an imaginary argument by Cooper in court, in which he made Cooper thus allude to his appearance: Fenimore-Well, then, your Honor, I offer to prove by this witness that the plaintiff is tow-headed, and half bald at that; he is long-legged, gaunt, and most cadaverous of visage-ergo, homely.... I have evidence to prove the said plaintiff slouching in dress; goes bent like a hoop, and so rocking in gait that he walks on both sides of the street at once. When, in 1844, Colonel James Watson Webb, in the Courier and Enquirer, accused Greeley of seeking notoriety by his oddity in dress, the Tribune retorted that its editor had been dressed better than any of his assailants could be if they paid their debts, adding that he ever affected eccentricity is most untrue ; and certainly no costume he ever appeared in would create such a sensation on Broadway as that which James Watson Webb would have worn but for the clemency of Governor Seward --an allusion to Webb'
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...