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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune. Search the whole document.

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Manchester (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
-198; opposition to Lincoln's renomination, 199-201; proposed withdrawal of Lincoln's name, 201; a fault-finder, 202; Niagara Falls negotiations, 203-208; letter to Lincoln, 208; a suppressed editorial, 210, 211; final view of Lincoln, 212, 213; for with, 93. J. Jackson-Adams campaign, 16. Jeffersonian (newspaper), 42, 43, 47-49. Jewett, W. C., part in Niagara Falls negotiations. 203-208. Jim Crow cars in Massachusetts, 131. Johnson, President, Andrew, Greeley on, 219. Jone90-192; reply to Greeley's Prayer of Twenty Millions, 197; Greeley's opposition to his renomination, 199-202; part in Niagara Falls negotiation, 203-208; suppressed editorial on, 210; Greeley's final view of, 212, 213. Log Cabin (newspaper), how last days, 54, 55; on slavery and the Abolitionists, 134-136; on Lovejoy's murder, 136; on Texas annexation, 143. Niagara Falls peace negotiations, 203-208. Northern Spectator, Greeley's employment on, 10-16, 19. Noyes's Academy, attack on
Lecompton (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
n, 137-148; listless support of Taylor, 148-151; defiance of New York business interests, 149-151, 161, 162; opposition to slavery in Congress, 151; Compromise of 1850, 151-163; reply to Calhoun, 154; on Webster's 7th of March speech, 158; abandons Wilmot proviso, 159; on fugitive slave law, 161-163; favors Scott's nomination, 163; on Kansas-Nebraska contest, 163, 165; early attitude toward Republican party, 166, 178; attack by Rust, 166; on Fremont's defeat, 167; Dred Scott decision, 168; Lecompton contest, 168; John Brown raid, 168; on office-holding editors, 171, 172, 175 ; desire for gubernatorial nomination, 172, 173, 176; advocacy of prohibition, 172; complaint to Seward, 173; letter dissolving the firm of Seward, Weed, and Greeley, 174-177; favors Douglas for Senator, 178; delegate to National Republican Convention of 1860, 179; preference for Bates, 179; reason for opposing Seward's nomination, 179, 183; Raymond's letter, 180-182; defeated for United States Senator, State Comp
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
63; reply to Calhoun, 154; on Webster's 7th of March speech, 158; abandons Wilmot proviso, 159; on fugitive slave law, 161-163; favors Scott's nomination, 163; on Kansas-Nebraska contest, 163, 165; early attitude toward Republican party, 166, 178; attack by Rust, 166; on Fremont's defeat, 167; Dred Scott decision, 168; Lecompton c Johnson, President, Andrew, Greeley on, 219. Jones, George, 13. Journalism, the best school, 14; country, 15, 58; office-holding editors, 171, 172. K. Kansas--Nebraska question, 163-165. Kuklux, Greeley on, 226. L. Lectures, Greeley's, 95-97; early lecture field, 95. Liberal Republican movement, origin of, 8, 149,151 ; rebuke of New York business interests, 149, 161 ; on Van Buren-Adams ticket, 151; on campaign of 1850, 157; on Webster's 7th of March speech, 158; on Kansas-Nebraska question, 163-165; Virginia indictment of, 167; on Dred Scott decision and John Brown's raid, 168; advocacy of the Maine law, 172; service to Seward, 174
East River (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
views of the stage, 65; use of epithets, 67, 154 note; report of Cooper libel suit, 68; newspaper versatility, 71; associates, 72; value of his isms to the Tribune, 76; his view of Independent thinking, 76-78, 83,146; refusal to be guided by Weed, 78; early sympathy with socialism, 79; support of Brisbane's Fourierism, 79-84; director of North American Phalanx, 81; discussion with Raymond, 84; later views on socialism, 84-86; acceptance of Graham's dietetic doctrine, 86; residence on the East River, 88; Margaret Fuller's views, 88, 89; opinion of spiritualism, 89-91; views on farming, 91-93; at Chappaqua, 92; sympathy with Ireland and Hungary, 93; as counselor-at-large, 94; his lectures, 95-97; member of Congress, 98-103, 151; visits to London and Paris, 104; how he edited the Tribune, 105; letters to Dana, 105, 106; experience with beggars, 106-108; editorial-room pictures, 108, 109; advocate of a protective tariff, 110-122; views of President Tyler, 113, 114; early prominence as a
Dallas, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
dential campaign of 1844, 119, 120; Greeley's choice in 1848, 148; defended as a slaveholder, 126, 144, 145; on Texas annexation, 142; Compromise of 1850, 151-163. Cochran, John, nominated for Vice-President, 199. Coggeshall, James, loan to Greeley, 59. Compromise of 1850,151-163. Congdon, C. T., 72. Constitutionalist, Greeley's work for, 26. Cooper libel suits, 11, 68. Crandall, Miss, opposition to her plan for negro education, 132. Curtis, George William, 72. D. Dallas, vote on tariff, 121. Dana, Charles A., 72, 82, 105. Davis, Judge, David, candidate for presidential nomination, 235. Davis, Jefferson, Greeley on, 218, 220-222. Depew, C. M., anecdote of Greeley, 107. De Tocqueville on early American newspapers, 27. Douglas, Stephen A., in the Kansas-Nebraska contest, 163-165; Greeley favors for Senator, 178. Dred Scott decision, 168. E. Evening Post, 111, 1.5 note. Express news-gathering, 73-76. F. Farming, Greeley on, 91-
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
7; on Greeley, 171. Gay, Sidney Howard, 72, 187, 210. Greeley, Horace, landing in New York city, 2, 20; early farm experience, 3-5; his mother. 3, 10; education, 6-8; precocity, 7; views of college education, 8; attraction to the printer's trade, 9; personal appearance, 11, 12, 19, 22; first newspaper writing, 13; views on journalism, 15; interest in politics, 16; a protectionist when a boy, 16; amusements, 17; non-user of intoxicants and tobacco, 18; employment in New York State and Pennsylvania, 19; first experiences in New York city, 21-24; partnership with Story, 24-26; offer by Bennett, 26; starts New Yorker, 27; his work on, 29; idea of newspaper work, 30; a poet, 32; editorial views in the New Yorker, 33-37; on clean journalism, 34, 66; State and Federal finances, 35-38; financial straits, 38, 39; first meeting with Weed, 42; the two men contrasted, 44-46; edits the Jeffersonian, 47-49; work for the Whig (newspaper), 47; on State committee, 48; edits the Log Cabin, 50-52; i
Nebraska (Nebraska, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
107. De Tocqueville on early American newspapers, 27. Douglas, Stephen A., in the Kansas-Nebraska contest, 163-165; Greeley favors for Senator, 178. Dred Scott decision, 168. E. Evenin Wilmot proviso, 159; on fugitive slave law, 161-163; favors Scott's nomination, 163; on Kansas-Nebraska contest, 163, 165; early attitude toward Republican party, 166, 178; attack by Rust, 166; on Fralism, the best school, 14; country, 15, 58; office-holding editors, 171, 172. K. Kansas--Nebraska question, 163-165. Kuklux, Greeley on, 226. L. Lectures, Greeley's, 95-97; early lectuomise, 127. Missouri, Liberal Republican movement in, 226-230. Morning Post, 25. N. Nebraska question, 163-165. Negro education, Northern opposition to, 132. Newspapers,--early, in tn-Adams ticket, 151; on campaign of 1850, 157; on Webster's 7th of March speech, 158; on Kansas-Nebraska question, 163-165; Virginia indictment of, 167; on Dred Scott decision and John Brown's raid, 1
of his isms to the Tribune, 76; his view of Independent thinking, 76-78, 83,146; refusal to be guided by Weed, 78; early sympathy with socialism, 79; support of Brisbane's Fourierism, 79-84; director of North American Phalanx, 81; discussion with Raymond, 84; later views on socialism, 84-86; acceptance of Graham's dietetic doctrine, 86; residence on the East River, 88; Margaret Fuller's views, 88, 89; opinion of spiritualism, 89-91; views on farming, 91-93; at Chappaqua, 92; sympathy with Ireland and Hungary, 93; as counselor-at-large, 94; his lectures, 95-97; member of Congress, 98-103, 151; visits to London and Paris, 104; how he edited the Tribune, 105; letters to Dana, 105, 106; experience with beggars, 106-108; editorial-room pictures, 108, 109; advocate of a protective tariff, 110-122; views of President Tyler, 113, 114; early prominence as a protection advocate, 115; his tariff principles, 116-118; support of Clay in 1844, 119, 120; plague of boils, 120; Clay his choice in 18
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
d's letter, 180-182; defeated for United States Senator, State Comptroller, and Congress, 182, 183; not a candidate for office under Lincoln, 184; justifies the right to secede, 184-187; Forward to Richmond cry, 188, 189; letter to Lincoln after Bull Run, 190; efforts for foreign mediation, 193-196; Prayer of Twenty Millions, 196-198; opposition to Lincoln's renomination, 199-201; proposed withdrawal of Lincoln's name, 201; a fault-finder, 202; Niagara Falls negotiations, 203-208; letter to Lincnnati convention, 234-244; platform, 239; balloting, 242-244; Greeley's nomination, 244; early dissolution of the movement, 246, 247. Lincoln, Abraham, Greeley's preference for Douglas, 178; caution to Greeley, 186; Greeley's letter to, after Bull Run, 190-192; reply to Greeley's Prayer of Twenty Millions, 197; Greeley's opposition to his renomination, 199-202; part in Niagara Falls negotiation, 203-208; suppressed editorial on, 210; Greeley's final view of, 212, 213. Log Cabin (newspaper
Chappaqua (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
alanx, 81; discussion with Raymond, 84; later views on socialism, 84-86; acceptance of Graham's dietetic doctrine, 86; residence on the East River, 88; Margaret Fuller's views, 88, 89; opinion of spiritualism, 89-91; views on farming, 91-93; at Chappaqua, 92; sympathy with Ireland and Hungary, 93; as counselor-at-large, 94; his lectures, 95-97; member of Congress, 98-103, 151; visits to London and Paris, 104; how he edited the Tribune, 105; letters to Dana, 105, 106; experience with beggars, 10itorial, 254-256; his death and its cause, 256-258; bust and statue, 258, 259. Greeley, Mrs., Horace, her husband's first acquaintance with, 87; a Grahamite, 87; admirer of Margaret Fuller, 88; acceptance of spiritualism, 90; requirements at Chappaqua, 93; her death, 256, 257. Greeley, Zacheus, 2-5, 10. Godkin, E. L., on Greeley's nomination, 236, 247. Godwin, Parke, 83, 116. Graham, Sylvester, dietetic doctrine, 86. Grant, U. S., causes of Republican opposition to, 214; sides wit
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