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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune. Search the whole document.

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Horace Greeley (search for this): chapter 2
one of whose wharves an Albany boat landed Horace Greeley one summer morning. His equipment for a sh his father subscribed. The first book that Greeley owned was The Columbian Orator, given to him me men, after going through such struggles as Greeley encountered, would have regretted in later yeses are all concessions to the idea for which Greeley then contended. A lad disgusted with the h trade as a congenial occupation. Newspapers Greeley had loved and devoured from the time when he ibel suits, in the early days of the Tribune, Greeley printed a report of an imaginary argument by as that kind of practical education for which Greeley always contended, and it was excellent fundamstic experiment that has proved a failure. Greeley's interest in politics began with his early iident, and Henry Clay Secretary of State when Greeley went to East Poultney, and public feeling wasg as an indoor exercise. Two rules of life Greeley had already formed when he reached New York-h[12 more...]
James Watson Webb (search for this): chapter 2
the said plaintiff slouching in dress; goes bent like a hoop, and so rocking in gait that he walks on both sides of the street at once. When, in 1844, Colonel James Watson Webb, in the Courier and Enquirer, accused Greeley of seeking notoriety by his oddity in dress, the Tribune retorted that its editor had been dressed better tding that he ever affected eccentricity is most untrue ; and certainly no costume he ever appeared in would create such a sensation on Broadway as that which James Watson Webb would have worn but for the clemency of Governor Seward --an allusion to Webb's sentence for fighting a duel. began with his boyhood, partly because he had Webb's sentence for fighting a duel. began with his boyhood, partly because he had no money with which to buy good clothes, and partly because he was indifferent in the matter. A tattered hat, a shirt and trousers of homespun material, and the coarsest of shoes, without stockings, sufficed for his summer costume, and when, on his arrival in New York city, he added a linen roundabout, his appearance was so amusi
ne, Greeley printed a report of an imaginary argument by Cooper in court, in which he made Cooper thus allude to his appearance: Fenimore-Well, then, your Honor, I offer to prove by this witness that the plaintiff is tow-headed, and half bald at that; he is long-legged, gaunt, and most cadaverous of visage-ergo, homely.... I have evidence to prove the said plaintiff slouching in dress; goes bent like a hoop, and so rocking in gait that he walks on both sides of the street at once. When, in 1844, Colonel James Watson Webb, in the Courier and Enquirer, accused Greeley of seeking notoriety by his oddity in dress, the Tribune retorted that its editor had been dressed better than any of his assailants could be if they paid their debts, adding that he ever affected eccentricity is most untrue ; and certainly no costume he ever appeared in would create such a sensation on Broadway as that which James Watson Webb would have worn but for the clemency of Governor Seward --an allusion to Webb'
for a living among entire strangers he has thus described: I was twenty years old the preceding February; tall, slender, pale, and plain; with ten dollars in my pocket, summer clothing worth perhaps as much more, nearly all on my back, and a decent knowledge of so much of the art of printing as a boy will usually learn in the office of a country newspaper. The Greeleys, for generations back, had not known affluence. Of Scotch-Irish stock, some of them had emigrated to America as early as 1640, and had fought the fight for a living as farmers or as blacksmiths. Horace's father Zaccheus was a farmer, and the future journalist was born on his farm of fifty acres five miles from Amherst, N. H., on February 3, 1811. With the best of management it would have been difficult to obtain from such a farm more than a living for the owner's family. The Greeleys did work hard, the mother sharing with her husband such labor as raking and loading hay, besides doing housework and carding and sp
June, 1830 AD (search for this): chapter 2
community where strong drink was as free as water, and nine years before the American Temperance Society declared for total abstinence. Soon after he went to Poultney he assisted in organizing a temperance society, and, to make sure that his own years would not bar him from membership, he had a resolution adopted that members be received when they were old enough to drink. The Northern Spectator was not a financial success. It struggled on, however, under different ownerships, until June, 1830, when its publication was discontinued and the office was closed. Greeley left the town with enlarged information on many subjects, including writing and speaking and the duties of newspaper editing. In the way of capital he had only $20 in cash and perhaps a few more clothes than he came into the town with. He went at once, part of the way on foot, to his parents' home, made a visit there of a few weeks, and then set out to seek work at his trade. He found employment at Jamestown and
led a good-sized town. The population of Manhattan Island (below the Harlem River) was only 202,589 in 1830, as compared with the 1,850,093 shown by the census of 1900; the total population of the district now embraced in Greater New York was then only 242,278, while in 1900 it was 3,437,202. The total assessed valuation of the 1900 it was 3,437,202. The total assessed valuation of the city, real and personal, in 1833, was only $166,491,542; in 1900 it was, for the Borough of Manhattan, $2,853,363,382. No railroad then landed passengers or freight in the city, no ocean steamers departed from the docks, and there was no telegraphic communication. Thirteenth Street marked the northern boundary of the settled part1900 it was, for the Borough of Manhattan, $2,853,363,382. No railroad then landed passengers or freight in the city, no ocean steamers departed from the docks, and there was no telegraphic communication. Thirteenth Street marked the northern boundary of the settled part of Manhattan Island, and although, in 1828, lots from two to six miles distant from the City Hall were valued at from only $60 to $700 each, more than one writer of the day was ready to concede that, owing to advantages of cheaper land on the opposite shores of Long Island and New Jersey, newcomers were likely to settle there be
reeley encountered, would have regretted in later years the loss of this opportunity. Greeley did not. On the contrary, he expressed his thanks that his parents did not let him be indebted to any one of whom he had not a right to expect such a favor, and he was ever hostile to the education furnished by the colleges of the day. To a young man who wrote to him in 1852 for his advice about going to college, Greeley replied, I think you might better be learning to fiddle, and in his Busy Life (1868) he said he would reply to the question, How shall I obtain an education, by saying, Learn a trade of a good master. I hold firmly that most boys may better acquire the knowledge they need than by spending four years in college. In an address at the laying of the corner-stone of the People's College at Havana, N. Y., in 1858, he explained, however, that he did not denounce a classical course of study, but only protested against the requirement of application to and proficiency in the dead l
les A. Dana, published after his death. He always felt a responsibility for the kind of journal that he gave to his subscribers. I think that newspaper reading is worth all the schools in the country, he told a committee of the House of Commons, of which Cobden was a member, when invited, in London in 1851, to give his views on taxes on knowledge, and he was too honest to offer his readers anything less than the best that he could supply. Some advice to a country editor, written by him in 1860, could hardly be improved upon. His first principle laid down was that the subject of deepest interest to an average human being is himself; next to that, he is most concerned about his neighbor. He therefore told his correspondent that, if he would make up at least half his paper of local news, secured by a wide-awake, judicious correspondent in every village and township in your county, nobody in the county can long do without it. Make your paper a perfect mirror of everything done in you
ment as a compositor New York city in 1831 Parentage and farm life his schooling opinions of a college education apprenticeship in Vermont appearance and dress views of country journalism amusements a nonuser of tobacco and liquor arrival in New York city The country lad who went to New York city in the summer of 1831 to seek his fortune, arrived in what would now be called a good-sized town. The population of Manhattan Island (below the Harlem River) was only 202,589 in 1830, as compared with the 1,850,093 shown by the census of 1900; the total population of the district now embraced in Greater New York was then only 242,278, while in 1900 it was 3,437,202. The total assessed valuation of the city, real and personal, in 1833, was only $166,491,542; in 1900 it was, for the Borough of Manhattan, $2,853,363,382. No railroad then landed passengers or freight in the city, no ocean steamers departed from the docks, and there was no telegraphic communication. Thirteen
January 1st, 1824 AD (search for this): chapter 2
New York-he was a non-user of intoxicants and tobacco. Neither of his parents, he says, was a total abstainer from the use of liquor, and both loved their pipe. But the son was made sick by smoking a half-burned cigar in his grandfather's house when not more than five years old, and from that time he looked on the use of tobacco in any form as if not the most pernicious, certainly the vilest, most detestable abuse of his corrupt sensual appetites whereof depraved man is capable. On January 1, 1824, young Greeley deliberately resolved to drink no more distilled liquors, and he kept this pledge thus made to himself when only thirteen years old, in a community where strong drink was as free as water, and nine years before the American Temperance Society declared for total abstinence. Soon after he went to Poultney he assisted in organizing a temperance society, and, to make sure that his own years would not bar him from membership, he had a resolution adopted that members be recei
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