hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Horace Greeley 888 2 Browse Search
Thurlow Weed 134 0 Browse Search
Zacheus Greeley 124 0 Browse Search
Henry Clay 120 0 Browse Search
William H. Seward 106 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 76 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 68 0 Browse Search
Nicolay-Hay Lincoln 64 0 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 62 0 Browse Search
Charles Francis Adams 60 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune. Search the whole document.

Found 180 total hits in 65 results.

... 2 3 4 5 6 7
those days whisky, rum, and cider were served even at the ordination of clergymen in parts of New England, and Zaccheus Greeley was never behind his neighbors in acts of hospitality. He was, his son has testified, a bad manager, and always in debt, and his farm did not enable him to gain on his indebtedness. In the hope of improving matters, he let his own farm to a younger brother and rented a larger one near by. But the brother could not meet his engagements, and the family moved back in 1819. Sickness ensued, a speculation in lumber proved disastrous, and the end came in the summer of 1820, when the home farm was seized by the sheriff at the instance of several creditors, the father took his departure to escape arrest for debt, and the farm and crops, when sold, left nothing for the wife and children. When night fell, wrote the son in later years, we were as bankrupt a family as well could be. Horace then had a brother, eight years old, and two sisters of six and four years; a
gland, and Zaccheus Greeley was never behind his neighbors in acts of hospitality. He was, his son has testified, a bad manager, and always in debt, and his farm did not enable him to gain on his indebtedness. In the hope of improving matters, he let his own farm to a younger brother and rented a larger one near by. But the brother could not meet his engagements, and the family moved back in 1819. Sickness ensued, a speculation in lumber proved disastrous, and the end came in the summer of 1820, when the home farm was seized by the sheriff at the instance of several creditors, the father took his departure to escape arrest for debt, and the farm and crops, when sold, left nothing for the wife and children. When night fell, wrote the son in later years, we were as bankrupt a family as well could be. Horace then had a brother, eight years old, and two sisters of six and four years; another sister was born in 1822. In the following January the Greeleys, with their effects packed i
iles from Clymer, N. Y., on which was a log cabin with a leaky roof, in a wilderness, where the woods abounded with wild animals, and the forest growth was so heavy that he and his younger son were a month in clearing an acre. By additional purchases he in time increased his holding to some three hundred acres. The life of the family there was a discouraging one, and Horace says he never saw the old smile on his mother's face from the day she entered that log cabin to the day of her death in 1855. That spring, before the family moved, Horace saw an advertisement, stating that an apprentice was wanted in the office of the Northern Spectator at East Poultney, Vt., and he at once applied for the place. In all his early applications for work his personal appearance was an obstacle to his success. His figure was tall and slender, and his head large and covered with a growth of yellowish, tow-colored hair, so light that it seemed almost white with age. Gawky would describe his general
ght remuneration of farming and land-clearing, and with a decided literary taste, naturally looked, in those days, to the printer's trade as a congenial occupation. Newspapers Greeley had loved and devoured from the time when he had learned to read, and when he was eleven years old he induced his father to accompany him to a newspaper office in Whitehall, N. Y., where he had heard that there was an opening for an apprentice. But he was rejected as too young for the place. By the spring of 1826 his father had given up the fight for a living in New England, and decided to carry out a project he had long had in mind — a move to Western Pennsylvania. He bought a tract of four acres in Erie County, about three miles from Clymer, N. Y., on which was a log cabin with a leaky roof, in a wilderness, where the woods abounded with wild animals, and the forest growth was so heavy that he and his younger son were a month in clearing an acre. By additional purchases he in time increased his ho
y. To a young man who wrote to him in 1852 for his advice about going to college, Greeley replied, I think you might better be learning to fiddle, and in his Busy Life (1868) he said he would reply to the question, How shall I obtain an education, by saying, Learn a trade of a good master. I hold firmly that most boys may better acquire the knowledge they need than by spending four years in college. In an address at the laying of the corner-stone of the People's College at Havana, N. Y., in 1858, he explained, however, that he did not denounce a classical course of study, but only protested against the requirement of application to and proficiency in the dead languages of all college students, regardless of the length of time they may be able to devote to study, and of the course of life they meditate. The founding of agricultural and technical colleges, the opening of scientific departments in our classical institutions, and the device of optional courses are all concessions to the
... 2 3 4 5 6 7