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Halifax (Canada) (search for this): chapter 6
of the mails by water at the nearest home port. On one occasion, when news of special importance was awaited, the Tribune engaged an express rider to meet the steamer (for Boston) at Halifax, and convey the news package with all speed across Nova Scotia to the Bay of Fundy, where a fast steamboat was to meet him and carry him to Portland, Me., whence a special locomotive would take him to Boston, from which point his budget would be hastened on to New York by rail and on horseback. Modern enterprise can not hope to excel this scheme, and we can sympathize with the editor in its failure to save him from being beaten. The rider made his way across Nova Scotia through drifts so deep that his sleigh was often upset, and was hurried across the Bay of Fundy through ice in some places eighteen inches thick, making Boston in thirty-one hours from Halifax-several hours ahead of the ocean steamer. But from that point delays were encountered, and, although the last rider made the trip from
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
was attracted by Sylvester Graham's dietetic doctrine that there is better food for man than the flesh of animals; that all stimulants, including tea and coffee, should be avoided; that bread should be made of unbolted flour, and that spices should not be used, and only the least possible salt. After hearing Graham lecture, he became an inmate of his boarding-house, where the table conformed to the new views, and it was there that he met his future wife, Miss Mary Y. Cheney, a native of Connecticut, who was teaching in North Carolina, and who was even more susceptible to new doctrines than was her husband. Greeley used no alcoholic liquors, did not care for tea, and had given up coffee when he found his hand trembling after partaking of it at an evening entertainment. He preferred meat, in after years, to hot bread, rancid butter, decayed fruit, and wilted vegetables, but always declared that, if we of this generation confined ourselves to a Graham diet, our grandchildren would li
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ng that things dreamed of were at last to be realized. Greeley's mind was naturally receptive of new plans for reform — a tendency inherited, perhaps, from his New England place of birth, that land in which every ism of social or religious life has had its origin. The hard experience of his own family, as he shared it in his earleen a farmer, he wrote in 1868. Were I now to begin my life over I would choose to earn my bread by cultivating the soil. The lack of intelligence displayed in New England agriculture was impressed upon him in his boyhood, and he never wrote more enthusiastically than in teaching farmers what he thought they ought to know. In thece which was willing to ask them. Hale's Lowell and his friends. Emerson wrote to a friend in 1843, There is now a lyceum, so called, in almost every town in New England, and if I would accept an invitation I might read a lecture every night. But all lecturers were not expected to contribute their wisdom or entertainment withou
n editorial, but could do marvelous pieces of reporting, compose interesting correspondence — as witness his letters from Europe and about his trip across the continent-and act as chief critic over all the columns under his control. To him, thereforoads were then in their infancy, with less than 3,000 miles in operation in this country in 1840. The first steamers to Europe began running in 1838. The Morse telegraph was first operated between Baltimore and Washington in 1844, and the first teation to the shores of America to assist in the foundation of an ideal society, and when philosophers on the continent of Europe were believing that things dreamed of were at last to be realized. Greeley's mind was naturally receptive of new plans f social questions, book reviews (including a very uncomplimentary one of Longfellow's poems), and afterward letters from Europe, and Greeley has given generous praise to her contributions and her aims. But when she demanded the fullest recognition
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
in the light of his later years, was that the social reformers were right on many points, and that Fourier was the most practical of them. He set forth in 1868, as part of his social creed, the following affirmations: I believe that there need be, and should be, no paupers who are not infantile, idiotic, or disabled; and that civilized society pays more for the support of able-bodied pauperism than the necessary cost of its extirpation. I believe that they babble idly and libel Providence who talk of surplus labor, or the inadequacy of capital to supply employment to all who need it. I believe that the efficiency of human effort is enormously, ruinously, diminished by what I term Social Anarchy. .... It is quite within the truth to estimate the annual product of our national industry at less than onehalf of what it might be if better applied and directed. The poor work at perpetual disadvantage in isolation, because of the inadequacy of their means. ... Association wo
Lexington (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
s so deep that his sleigh was often upset, and was hurried across the Bay of Fundy through ice in some places eighteen inches thick, making Boston in thirty-one hours from Halifax-several hours ahead of the ocean steamer. But from that point delays were encountered, and, although the last rider made the trip from New Haven in four hours and a half, a rival journal had had the news on the street for two hours before him. When Henry Clay delivered an important speech on the Mexican War, in Lexington, Ky., on November 13, 1847, the Tribune's report of it was carried to Cincinnati by horse express, and thence transmitted by wire, appearing in the edition of November 15. During the Mexican War a pony express carried the news from New Orleans to Petersburg, Va., the nearest telegraph station, in this way delivering the New Orleans papers of March 29 at the telegraph office on February 4. The exploits of these expresses were described by the press all over the country, and all this gave
Hungary (Hungary) (search for this): chapter 6
hich have since been accepted by thousands of agriculturists; sound views about waste in the use of fertilizers; pleas for birds as farmers' assistants, and sensible advice on such subjects as deep plowing, level culture for potatoes, and the necessity of keeping farm accounts. Merely to mention subjects under the general classification of reforms to which the Tribune gave support in its earlier years, we may recall its enthusiastic defense of the Irish cause in 1848, and of the cause of Hungary, in whose behalf it proposed the raising of a patriotic loan, in shares of $100; its championship of cooperation in labor; its gradual approach to the radical view of temperance legislation represented by the Maine law, and its opposition to capital punishment, to more liberal divorce laws, and to flogging in the navy. It is true that its espousal of many causes raised up a host of enemies for the Tribune, and no other newspaper in the United States was looked on as so dangerous by thos
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
months. That the Tribune and its editor might not be held responsible for the views expressed, each of these articles (with a few exceptions) bore this caption: This column has been purchased by the advocates of Association, in order to lay their principles before the public. Its authorship is entirely distinct from that of the Tribune. The Tribune had little to say on the subject while it was publishing the Brisbane essays, but on January 20, 1843, the Fourier Association of the City of New York was formed, and Greeley was the first-named director of the North American Phalanx, organized soon after, with a capital of $400,000, to put the Association idea into practise, and the Tribune of January 27, in that year, said: We can not but believe that Association, with its concert of action, its unity of interests, its vast economies, and its more effective application of labor and other means of production will be extremely profitable, and offer to those who enter it not only a saf
Brazil, Clay County, Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
bot's Catholicism-something like the isms of all true men in all true centuries. The Tribune was started when, in the words of John Morley, a great wave of humanity, of benevolence, of desire for improvement — a great wave of social sentiment, in short-poured itself among all who had the faculty of large and disinterested thinking ; a day when Pusey and Thomas Arnold, Carlyle and Dickens, Cobden and O'Connell, were arousing new interest in old subjects; when the communistic experiments in Brazil and Owen's project at Hopedale inspired expectation of social improvement; when Southey and Coleridge meditated a migration to the shores of America to assist in the foundation of an ideal society, and when philosophers on the continent of Europe were believing that things dreamed of were at last to be realized. Greeley's mind was naturally receptive of new plans for reform — a tendency inherited, perhaps, from his New England place of birth, that land in which every ism of social or religi
Hopedale (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ke the isms of all true men in all true centuries. The Tribune was started when, in the words of John Morley, a great wave of humanity, of benevolence, of desire for improvement — a great wave of social sentiment, in short-poured itself among all who had the faculty of large and disinterested thinking ; a day when Pusey and Thomas Arnold, Carlyle and Dickens, Cobden and O'Connell, were arousing new interest in old subjects; when the communistic experiments in Brazil and Owen's project at Hopedale inspired expectation of social improvement; when Southey and Coleridge meditated a migration to the shores of America to assist in the foundation of an ideal society, and when philosophers on the continent of Europe were believing that things dreamed of were at last to be realized. Greeley's mind was naturally receptive of new plans for reform — a tendency inherited, perhaps, from his New England place of birth, that land in which every ism of social or religious life has had its origin.
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