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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune. Search the whole document.

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Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ration and contemptible puns, and expressing his unqualified admiration for Mrs. Hemans, in whose Adopted Child he had found hours of pure and tranquil pleasure. Most of the audiences which listened to these discourses were lyceums, or young men's associations in country villages. The great place for lectures in New York city was the Tabernacle, which seated 3,000 persons. Greeley's audiences there numbered on an average 1,200 in the early fifties. In a course of lectures delivered in Chicago in 1853, when its population was about 30,000, Greeley stood second as a drawing card, being only preceded by Bayard Taylor in a list which included John G. Saxe, R. W. Emerson, Theodore Parker, George William Curtis, Horace Mann, and E. P. Whipple. In 1848 Greeley was elected to Congress, for the only time in his career, accepting a nomination in the upper district of New York city, to fill a vacancy caused by the unseating of a Democrat on charges of fraud at the polls, without the se
George William Curtis (search for this): chapter 6
who recognized the value of news, who knew how to select capable subordinates, and how best to direct their efforts. Among other contributors and editorial assistants to whom the Tribune was indebted were Margaret Fuller, Bayard Taylor, George William Curtis, Edmund Quincy ( Byles ), William Henry Frye, Hildreth, the historian, and Charles T. Congdon. Charles A. Dana joined the staff in 1847, and remained with it, a larger part of the time as managing editor, until 1862. George Ripley began a course of lectures delivered in Chicago in 1853, when its population was about 30,000, Greeley stood second as a drawing card, being only preceded by Bayard Taylor in a list which included John G. Saxe, R. W. Emerson, Theodore Parker, George William Curtis, Horace Mann, and E. P. Whipple. In 1848 Greeley was elected to Congress, for the only time in his career, accepting a nomination in the upper district of New York city, to fill a vacancy caused by the unseating of a Democrat on charge
Nathaniel Hawthorne (search for this): chapter 6
their investment. The Tribune and its editor incurred a great deal of criticism, and the paper lost some readers, because of Greeley's espousal of the socialist doctrines, but he refused to disassociate himself from the experiments while they were being tried, and the attacks on him helped to advertise him and his paper, and increased its circulation among those who could not regard as inherently wrong a cause supported, or countenanced, by men like George Ripley, Charles A. Dana, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Parke Godwin. In February, 1841, Greeley wrote to Weed that he took a wrong view of the political bearing of the Fourier matter, explaining: Hitherto all the devotees of social reform of any kind have been regularly repelled from the Whig party, and attracted to its opposite. It strikes me that it is unwise to persist in this course, unless we are to be considered the enemies of improvement, and the bulwarks of an outgrown aristocracy in this country. In a letter to R. W. Gr
Horace Greeley (search for this): chapter 6
began writing for it in 1861, and, outliving Greeley, gave to its literary columns for twenty yeary J. Raymond wrote to R. W. Griswold in 1841: Greeley got himself into a scrape by connecting himsed have been rejected by modern socialists. Greeley was attracted by Sylvester Graham's dietetic o excuse, when guests were present. Usually, Greeley tells us, a day, or at most two, of beans and elsewhere a more congenial hospitality. Mrs. Greeley made the acquaintance of Margaret Fuller inge. Thus we see that there were isms to which Greeley could not be attracted. Greeley was responagricultural subjects. In no character was Greeley so satirized as in that of a farmer, professiting that he could fill a hole in a program. Greeley was never an orator, but people have a curiosts a mile, by the usual traveled route. When Greeley made his first call on the sergeant-at-arms fcey M. Depew has told of finding a visitor in Greeley's editorial room when he made a call on him. [61 more...]
W. H. Channing (search for this): chapter 6
er of the capital was paid in, but a big dwelling for the members and their families, called the Phalanstery, was erected, with a steam apparatus for cooking and washing, and mills, storehouses, and other buildings. All the members were divided into groups, each of which was assigned its outdoor or indoor work. This experiment attracted a great deal of attention. Charles A. Dana and his family were for a time residents of the Phalanstery, and Margaret Fuller, Frederica Bremmer, and Rev. W. H. Channing were among its visitors; but the Phalanx, like Brook farm and Sylvania, was not a permanent success. Sylvania passed into the hands of the mortgagee in two years, and, after a disastrous fire, with some other setbacks, the property of the Phalanx was sold, its debts were paid, and the stockholders received a dividend equal to about 65 per cent of their investment. The Tribune and its editor incurred a great deal of criticism, and the paper lost some readers, because of Greeley's e
associates, to the day of his death, took no unimportant part in the making of the paper. In his first chief assistant, Raymond, he secured one of the ablest journalists of the day — a man who recognized the value of news, who knew how to select capable subordinates, and how best to direct their efforts. Among other contributors and editorial assistants to whom the Tribune was indebted were Margaret Fuller, Bayard Taylor, George William Curtis, Edmund Quincy ( Byles ), William Henry Frye, Hildreth, the historian, and Charles T. Congdon. Charles A. Dana joined the staff in 1847, and remained with it, a larger part of the time as managing editor, until 1862. George Ripley began writing for it in 1861, and, outliving Greeley, gave to its literary columns for twenty years a reputation that was unrivaled. Sidney Howard Gay, who was so conscientious an abolitionist that he abandoned his plan of becoming a lawyer because he could not take the oath to sustain the Federal Constitution, but
Charles A. Dana (search for this): chapter 6
George William Curtis, Edmund Quincy ( Byles ), William Henry Frye, Hildreth, the historian, and Charles T. Congdon. Charles A. Dana joined the staff in 1847, and remained with it, a larger part of the time as managing editor, until 1862. George Riroups, each of which was assigned its outdoor or indoor work. This experiment attracted a great deal of attention. Charles A. Dana and his family were for a time residents of the Phalanstery, and Margaret Fuller, Frederica Bremmer, and Rev. W. H. among those who could not regard as inherently wrong a cause supported, or countenanced, by men like George Ripley, Charles A. Dana, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Parke Godwin. In February, 1841, Greeley wrote to Weed that he took a wrong view of the pinst us. I saw From whence in your verse, too. Don't you think that is shocking-positively shocking? His letters to Charles A. Dana, written while he was watching the Banks speakership contest in 1855-56,lZZZ give many pictures of him in the role o
Albert Brisbane (search for this): chapter 6
a decent subsistence as the just reward of such labor. Greeley's sympathies were therefore ready to interest him in Albert Brisbane, a convert to Fourier's teaching, who had made the acquaintance of the French philosopher in France, and his friends, from his conversation, soon found that he had accepted Fourier's views. Brisbane edited a magazine called The Future, which was printed in Greeley's office, and whose prospectus said: The primary, positive, and definite object of its labors will down upon him with a vengeance. He's rather sorry that he enlisted, and is trying to take the curse off by advertising Brisbane's name as editor. The Tribune of November, 1841, contained an editorial which said: We have written something, and shaion is developed in the writings of Charles Fourier. In the Tribune of March 1, 1842, was begun a series of articles by Brisbane on Association, which were continued for many months. That the Tribune and its editor might not be held responsible fo
Charles Fourier (search for this): chapter 6
mpathies were therefore ready to interest him in Albert Brisbane, a convert to Fourier's teaching, who had made the acquaintance of the French philosopher in France, and his friends, from his conversation, soon found that he had accepted Fourier's views. Brisbane edited a magazine called The Future, which was printed in Greeleyom the globe. The germ of this revolution is developed in the writings of Charles Fourier. In the Tribune of March 1, 1842, was begun a series of articles by BrisbCourier and Enquirer, in April, 1844, spoke of the Tribune as the organ of Charles Fourier, Fanny Wright, and R. D. Owen, advocating from day to day the destruction ahead of the Herald in circulation and business, we shall expect to hear that Fourier was a Fiji cannibal and the original contriver of Asiatic cholera. In 1846 later years, was that the social reformers were right on many points, and that Fourier was the most practical of them. He set forth in 1868, as part of his social
up some dust, says Greeley in his autobiography, but my expectations were outrun. I have divided the House into two parties, he wrote to his friend Griswold at the time; one that would like to see me extinguished, and the other that wouldn't be satisfied without a hand in doing it. For some days members simply discussed the matter with one another or with their critic. Him they could not bend. On December 27 the subject was brought to the attention of the House by an Ohio member named Sawyer, who had been previously held up to ridicule by a Tribune correspondent for eating his luncheon during the session behind the Speaker's chair, and who, in the table, was credited with receiving $281 more than was his honest due. Mr. Turner, of Illinois, whose excess of mileage was nearly $200, moved the appointment of a committee to inquire whether the Tribune's charges did not amount to an allegation of fraud against the members, and to report whether they were false or true. Turner charge
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