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Horace Mann (search for this): chapter 6
ceums, or young men's associations in country villages. The great place for lectures in New York city was the Tabernacle, which seated 3,000 persons. Greeley's audiences there numbered on an average 1,200 in the early fifties. In a course of lectures delivered in Chicago in 1853, when its population was about 30,000, Greeley stood second as a drawing card, being only preceded by Bayard Taylor in a list which included John G. Saxe, R. W. Emerson, Theodore Parker, George William Curtis, Horace Mann, and E. P. Whipple. In 1848 Greeley was elected to Congress, for the only time in his career, accepting a nomination in the upper district of New York city, to fill a vacancy caused by the unseating of a Democrat on charges of fraud at the polls, without the seating of his Whig opponent. As the term would last only from December to March, and the original candidate declined the nomination for the short term when the nomination for the full term was denied him, Greeley got the place.
Margaret Fuller (search for this): chapter 6
on with Fourierism later views on socialism the Graham diet Margaret Fuller what he believed about spiritual rappings his devotion to faand editorial assistants to whom the Tribune was indebted were Margaret Fuller, Bayard Taylor, George William Curtis, Edmund Quincy ( Byles )d his family were for a time residents of the Phalanstery, and Margaret Fuller, Frederica Bremmer, and Rev. W. H. Channing were among its visongenial hospitality. Mrs. Greeley made the acquaintance of Margaret Fuller in Boston, and attended the conversations, for women only, planned by Miss Fuller, to discuss what woman was born to do, and how she could do it, and it was at Mrs. Greeley's invitation that Margaret becast River, at Turtle Bay, nearly opposite Blackwell's Island. Margaret Fuller described it as two miles or more from the thickly settled parhappiness. Greeley did not grant a ready acceptance to all of Miss Fuller's views. She wrote a great deal for the Tribune, however, on so
John G. Saxe (search for this): chapter 6
e. Most of the audiences which listened to these discourses were lyceums, or young men's associations in country villages. The great place for lectures in New York city was the Tabernacle, which seated 3,000 persons. Greeley's audiences there numbered on an average 1,200 in the early fifties. In a course of lectures delivered in Chicago in 1853, when its population was about 30,000, Greeley stood second as a drawing card, being only preceded by Bayard Taylor in a list which included John G. Saxe, R. W. Emerson, Theodore Parker, George William Curtis, Horace Mann, and E. P. Whipple. In 1848 Greeley was elected to Congress, for the only time in his career, accepting a nomination in the upper district of New York city, to fill a vacancy caused by the unseating of a Democrat on charges of fraud at the polls, without the seating of his Whig opponent. As the term would last only from December to March, and the original candidate declined the nomination for the short term when the
orgotten. Herein we get Greeley's idea of isms, a conception not unlike Carlyle's definition of a certain abbot's Catholicism-something like the isms of all true men in all true centuries. The Tribune was started when, in the words of John Morley, a great wave of humanity, of benevolence, of desire for improvement — a great wave of social sentiment, in short-poured itself among all who had the faculty of large and disinterested thinking ; a day when Pusey and Thomas Arnold, Carlyle and Dickens, Cobden and O'Connell, were arousing new interest in old subjects; when the communistic experiments in Brazil and Owen's project at Hopedale inspired expectation of social improvement; when Southey and Coleridge meditated a migration to the shores of America to assist in the foundation of an ideal society, and when philosophers on the continent of Europe were believing that things dreamed of were at last to be realized. Greeley's mind was naturally receptive of new plans for reform — a ten
Roger Coverley (search for this): chapter 6
d in summing up his experience says, I can not remember a single instance in which the promise to repay was made good. But he went on lending. To a clerk from New Hampshire, who, arriving in New York with his wife penniless, asked for a loan to take him back to his father's house, Greeley replied, Stranger, I must help you get away. But why say anything about paying me? You know, and I know, you will never pay a cent. This makes us recall that when the Spectator went out to meet Sir Roger de Coverley he could hear him chiding a beggar asking alms for not finding some work, but at the same time handing him sixpence. Some applicants, however, did meet with a refusal. Chauncey M. Depew has told of finding a visitor in Greeley's editorial room when he made a call on him. The editor's patience had evidently been almost exhausted, and as he wrote on steadily he would give an occasional kick toward the caller, who every now and then put in a word. Finally, turning round, Greeley s
s eleven columns of arguments as to the feasibility of sustaining the opera in New York if they would only play his compositions. I don't believe three hundred who take the Tribune care one chew of tobacco for the matter! Again he wrote: I shall have to quit here or die, unless you stop attacking people here without consulting me; and again: If you were to live fifty years and do nothing but good all the time, you could hardly atone for the mischief you have done by that article on Benton. ... I write once more to entreat that I may be allowed to conduct the Tribune with reference to the mile wide that stretches either way from Pennsylvania Avenue. It is but a small space, and you have all the world besides. Indicating his zeal for exactness, and his quick detection of an error, he wrote: The Tribune of Monday says that the bank suspension took place in 1836. It was 1837 (May 10). Please correct in Weekly. Greeley was always easily approached, and the demands on his pur
his supervision. He was not an easy man to please, as he considered all mistakes likely to be placed on his own shoulders. The style of his own editorial articles was clear, forceful, and concise, without rhetorical adornment, and he expected his assistants to follow his model. Writing to one of these who had gotten out a number of the New Yorker in 1840, while he was in Albany, Greeley said: The last New Yorker was a very fair number, bating typographical errors, such as Dugal for Dugald Stuart, which is awful, as insinuating ignorance against us. I saw From whence in your verse, too. Don't you think that is shocking-positively shocking? His letters to Charles A. Dana, written while he was watching the Banks speakership contest in 1855-56,lZZZ give many pictures of him in the role of the editorial supervisor. One of these letters began thus: What would it cost to burn the Opera House? If the price is reasonable, have it done and send me the bill. . . . All Congress is dis
E. P. Whipple (search for this): chapter 6
n's associations in country villages. The great place for lectures in New York city was the Tabernacle, which seated 3,000 persons. Greeley's audiences there numbered on an average 1,200 in the early fifties. In a course of lectures delivered in Chicago in 1853, when its population was about 30,000, Greeley stood second as a drawing card, being only preceded by Bayard Taylor in a list which included John G. Saxe, R. W. Emerson, Theodore Parker, George William Curtis, Horace Mann, and E. P. Whipple. In 1848 Greeley was elected to Congress, for the only time in his career, accepting a nomination in the upper district of New York city, to fill a vacancy caused by the unseating of a Democrat on charges of fraud at the polls, without the seating of his Whig opponent. As the term would last only from December to March, and the original candidate declined the nomination for the short term when the nomination for the full term was denied him, Greeley got the place. He attracted wide
appeared in its columns, his associates, to the day of his death, took no unimportant part in the making of the paper. In his first chief assistant, Raymond, he secured one of the ablest journalists of the day — a man who recognized the value of news, who knew how to select capable subordinates, and how best to direct their efforts. Among other contributors and editorial assistants to whom the Tribune was indebted were Margaret Fuller, Bayard Taylor, George William Curtis, Edmund Quincy ( Byles ), William Henry Frye, Hildreth, the historian, and Charles T. Congdon. Charles A. Dana joined the staff in 1847, and remained with it, a larger part of the time as managing editor, until 1862. George Ripley began writing for it in 1861, and, outliving Greeley, gave to its literary columns for twenty years a reputation that was unrivaled. Sidney Howard Gay, who was so conscientious an abolitionist that he abandoned his plan of becoming a lawyer because he could not take the oath to sustai
ose receiving his ministrations including young men seeking employment, young doctors and lawyers, country merchants, would-be editors, and inquiring farmers. Greeley's lectures also gave him and his paper a good deal of advertising. It is somewhat difficult to realize to-day the importance of the lecture platform when it was considered a sort of duty for educated men to have on hand a lecture or two which they were willing to read to any audience which was willing to ask them. Hale's Lowell and his friends. Emerson wrote to a friend in 1843, There is now a lyceum, so called, in almost every town in New England, and if I would accept an invitation I might read a lecture every night. But all lecturers were not expected to contribute their wisdom or entertainment without compensation. It was said in the early fifties that Zzz Ik Marvel, from the delivery of one not very good lecture, could secure money enough to support himself while he was writing a really good book, and that
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