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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ed an address from the women of England to those of America:-- It is made up of the facts, the documents, facts. It says: An early copy was sent from America the latter end of April to Mr. Bogue, the publisher no decline. The story was dramatized in the United States in August, 1852, without the consent or knowledgf the great principle of universal brotherhood. In America the Frenchman, the German, the Italian, the Swede, e world are so interesting to Europeans as those of America; for America is fast filling up from Europe, and evAmerica is fast filling up from Europe, and every European has almost immediately his vote in her councils. If, therefore, the oppressed of other nations desire to find in America an asylum of permanent freedom, let them come prepared, heart and hand, and vote agaiterary journals: The abolitionists in the United States should vote the author of Uncle Tom's Cabin a ciol, for the education of colored teachers in the United States and in Canada. I have very much wished that som
Andover (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
The time is short. I am very, very sorry that I shall not be able to see you. I must say farewell to you in this way. Hoping that in the length of time you may live to witness the progression of the good sake for which you so nobly have fought, my best wishes go with you. Yours in friendship, Jenny Goldschmidt. While Mrs. Stowe was thus absent from home, her husband received and accepted a most urgent call to the Professorship of Sacred Literature in the Theological Seminary at Andover, Mass. In regard to leaving Brunswick and her many friends there, Mrs. Stowe wrote: For my part, if I must leave Brunswick, I would rather leave at once. I can tear away with a sudden pull more easily than to linger there knowing that I am to leave at last. I shall never find people whom I shall like better than those of Brunswick. As Professor Stowe's engagements necessitated his spending much of the summer in Brunswick, and also making a journey to Cincinnati, it devolved upon
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 11
s called to Andover. fitting up the new home. the Key to Uncle Tom's Cabin. Uncle Tom abroad. how it was published in England. preface to the European edition. the book in France. in Germany. a greeting from Charles Kingsley. preparing to visit Scotland. letter to Mrs. Follen. Very soon after the publication of Uncle Tom's Cabin Mrs. Stowe visited her brother Henry in Brooklyn, and while there became intensely interested in the case of the Edmondsons, a slave family of Washington, D. C. Emily and Mary two of the daughters of Paul (a free colored man) and Milly (a slave) Edmondson, had, for trying to escape from bondage, been sold to a trader for the New Orleans market. While they were lying in jail in Alexandria awaiting the making up of a gang for the South, their heartbroken father determined to visit the North and try to beg from a freedom-loving people the money with which to purchase his daughters' liberty. The sum asked by the trader was $2,250, but its magnit
Milton, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
d would help me till I got through, and still I am pressed beyond measure and above strength. This horror, this nightmare abomination! can it be in my country! It lies like lead on my heart, it shadows my life with sorrow; the more so that I feel, as for my own brothers, for the South, and am pained by every horror I am obliged to write, as one who is forced by some awful oath to disclose in court some family disgrace. Many times I have thought that I must die, and yet I pray God that I may live to see something done. I shall in all probability be in London in May: shall I see you? It seems to me so odd and dream-like that so many persons desire to see me, and now I cannot help thinking that they will think, when they do, that God hath chosen the weak things of this world. If I live till spring I shall hope to see Shakespeare's grave, and Milton's mulberry-tree, and the good land of my fathers,--old, old England! May that day come! Yours affectionately, H. B. Stowe.
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
rance. in Germany. a greeting from Charles Kingsley. preparing to visit Scotland. letter to Mrs. Follen. Very soon after the publication of Uncle Tom's Cabin Mrs. Stowe visited her brother Henry in Brooklyn, and while there became intensely interested in the case of the Edmondsons, a slave family of Washington, D. C. Emily and Mary two of the daughters of Paul (a free colored man) and Milly (a slave) Edmondson, had, for trying to escape from bondage, been sold to a trader for the New Orleans market. While they were lying in jail in Alexandria awaiting the making up of a gang for the South, their heartbroken father determined to visit the North and try to beg from a freedom-loving people the money with which to purchase his daughters' liberty. The sum asked by the trader was $2,250, but its magnitude did not appall the brave old man, and he set forth upon his quest full of faith that in some way he would secure it. Reaching New York, he went to the anti-slavery bureau and
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
d sister are delightful. Last evening a party of us went to ride on horseback down to Pomp's Pond. What a beautiful place it is! There is everything here that there is at Brunswick except the sea,--a great exception. Yesterday I was out all the forenoon sketching elms. There is no end to the beauty of these trees. I shall fill my book with them before I get through. We had a levee at Professor Park's last week,--quite a brilliant affair. To-day there is to be a fishing party to go to Salem beach and have a chowder. It seems almost too good to be true that we are going to have such a house in such a beautiful place, and to live here among all these agreeable people, where everybody seems to love you so much and to think so much of you. I am almost afraid to accept it, and should not, did I not see the Hand that gives it all and know that it is both firm and true. He knows if it is best for us, and His blessing addeth no sorrow therewith. I cannot describe to you the const
Brunswick, Me. (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
erature in the Theological Seminary at Andover, Mass. In regard to leaving Brunswick and her many friends there, Mrs. Stowe wrote: For my part, if I must leave Brunswick, I would rather leave at once. I can tear away with a sudden pull more easily than to linger there knowing that I am to leave at last. I shall never find people whom I shall like better than those of Brunswick. As Professor Stowe's engagements necessitated his spending much of the summer in Brunswick, and alBrunswick, and also making a journey to Cincinnati, it devolved upon his wife to remain in Andover, and superintend the preparation of the house they were to occupy. This was known nd. What a beautiful place it is! There is everything here that there is at Brunswick except the sea,--a great exception. Yesterday I was out all the forenoon skeintended? Ah, welladay! At last the house was finished, the removal from Brunswick effected, and the reunited family was comfortably settled in its Andover hom
Glasgow (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 11
itness against my country and send it into all countries, that the general voice of humanity may quicken our paralyzed vitality, that all Christians may pray for us, and that shame, honor, love of country, and love of Christ may be roused to give us strength to cast out this mighty evil. Yours for the oppressed, H. B. Stowe. This harassing, brain-wearying, and heart-sickening labor was continued until the first of April, 1853, when, upon invitation of the Anti-Slavery Society of Glasgow, Scotland, Mrs. Stowe, accompanied by her husband and her brother, Charles Beecher, sailed for Europe. In the mean time the success of Uncle Tom's Cabin abroad was already phenomenal and unprecedented. From the pen of Mr. Sampson Low, the well-known London publisher, we have the following interesting statement regarding it-- The first edition printed in London was in April, 1852, by Henry Vizetelly, in a neat volume at ten and sixpence, of which he issued 7,000 copies. He received the
employed in getting out the book, and seventeen printing machines besides hand presses. Already about 150,000 copies of the book are in the hands of the people, and still the returns of sales show no decline. The story was dramatized in the United States in August, 1852, without the consent or knowledge of the author, who had neglected to reserve her rights for this purpose. In September of the same year we find it announced as the attraction at two London theatres, namely, the Royal Victoria and the Great National Standard. In 1853 Professor Stowe writes: The drama of Uncle Tom has been going on in the National Theatre of New York all summer with most unparalleled success. Everybody goes night after night, and nothing can stop it. The enthusiasm beats that of the run in the Boston Museum out and out. The Tribune is full of it. The Observer, the Journal of Commerce, and all that sort of fellows, are astonished and nonplussed. They do not know what to say or do about i
Henry Vizetelly (search for this): chapter 11
ng statement regarding it-- The first edition printed in London was in April, 1852, by Henry Vizetelly, in a neat volume at ten and sixpence, of which he issued 7,000 copies. He received the firough the nominal agency of Clarke & Co. The 7,000 copies sold, other editions followed, and Mr. Vizetelly disposed of his interest in the book to the printer and agent, who joined with Mr. Beeton anGilpin, late of Bishopsgate Street. Being declined by Mr. Gilpin, Mr. Bogue offered it to Mr. Henry Vizetelly, and by the latter gentleman it was eventually purchased for us. Before printing it, however, as there was one night allowed for decision, one volume was taken home to be read by Mr. Vizetelly, and the other by Mr. Salisbury, the printer, of Bouverie Street. The report of the latter gent settled in my mind that it was a book that ought to, and might with safety, be printed. Mr. Vizetelly's opinion coincided with that of Mr. Salisbury, and to the latter gentleman it was confided
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