hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
H. B. Stowe 492 0 Browse Search
Harriet Beecher Stowe 274 2 Browse Search
Hartford (Connecticut, United States) 128 4 Browse Search
America (Netherlands) 128 0 Browse Search
A. T. Noel Byron 126 0 Browse Search
Jesus Christ 122 0 Browse Search
Department de Ville de Paris (France) 100 0 Browse Search
Europe 94 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 82 0 Browse Search
George Eliot 76 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe. Search the whole document.

Found 298 total hits in 101 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Annie Howard (search for this): chapter 11
s grace of a little child, the poetic effect of a wood-nymph, is airy, light, and graceful. We had first-rate seats, and how do you think we got them? When Mr. Howard went early in the morning for tickets, Mr. Goldschmidt told him it was impossible to get any good ones, as they were all sold. Mr. Howard said he regretted thaMr. Howard said he regretted that, on Mrs. Stowe's account, as she was very desirous of hearing Jenny Lind. Mrs. Stowe! exclaimed Mr. Goldschmidt, the author of Uncle Tom's Cabin? Indeed, she shall have a seat whatever happens! Thereupon he took his hat and went out, returning shortly with tickets for two of the best seats in the house, inclosed in an envelope directed to me in his wife's handwriting. Mr. Howard said he could have sold those tickets at any time during the day for ten dollars each. To-day I sent a note of acknowledgment with a copy of my book. I am most happy to have seen her, for she is a noble creature. To this note the great singer wrote in answer:--
n of slavery; for they who enslave man cannot themselves remain free. True are the great words of Kossuth: No nation can remain free with whom freedom is a privilege and not a principle. This preface was more or less widely copied in the twenty translations of the book that quickly followed its first appearance. These, arranged in the alphabetical order of their languages, are as follows: Armenian, Bohemian, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Flemish, French, German, Hungarian, Illyrian, Italian, Polish, Portuguese, Romaic or modern Greek, Russian, Servian, Spanish, Wallachian, and Welsh. In Germany it received the following flattering notice from one of the leading literary journals: The abolitionists in the United States should vote the author of Uncle Tom's Cabin a civic crown, for a more powerful ally than Mrs. Harriet Beecher Stowe and her romance they could not have. We confess that in the whole modern romance literature of Germany, England, and France, we know of n
John P. Jewett (search for this): chapter 11
his mind about everything. In his old age he attends prayer-meetings and reads the Missionary Herald. He also has plenty of money in an old brown sea-chest. He is a great heart with an inflexible will and iron muscles. I must go to Orr's Island and see him again. I am now writing an article for the Era on Maine and its scenery, which I think is even better than the Independent letter. In it I took up Longfellow. Next I shall write one on Hawthorne and his surroundings. To-day Mrs. Jewett sent out a most solemnly savage attack upon me from the Alabama planter. Among other things it says: The plan for assaulting the best institutions in the world may be made just as rational as it is by the wicked (perhaps unconsciously so) authoress of this book. The woman who wrote it must be either a very bad or a very fanatical person. For her own domestic peace we trust no enemy will ever penetrate into her household to pervert the scenes he may find there with as little logic or ki
Charles Kingsley (search for this): chapter 11
ncle Tom's Cabin. Uncle Tom abroad. how it was published in England. preface to the European edition. the book in France. in Germany. a greeting from Charles Kingsley. preparing to visit Scotland. letter to Mrs. Follen. Very soon after the publication of Uncle Tom's Cabin Mrs. Stowe visited her brother Henry in Broos hardly ever offered by such a genius to any living mortal. Should Mrs. Stowe conclude to visit Europe she will have a triumph. From Eversley parsonage Charles Kingsley wrote to Mrs. Stowe:-- A thousand thanks for your delightful letter. As for your progress and ovation here in England, I have no fear for you. You willmust go through. I have many a story to tell you when we meet about the effects of the great book upon the most unexpected people. Yours ever faithfully, C. Kingsley. March 28, 1853, Professor Stowe sent the following communication to the Committee of Examination of the Theological Seminary at Andover: As I shall
internal struggles of no other nation in the world are so interesting to Europeans as those of America; for America is fast filling up from Europe, and every European has almost immediately his vote in her councils. If, therefore, the oppressed of other nations desire to find in America an asylum of permanent freedom, let them come prepared, heart and hand, and vote against the institution of slavery; for they who enslave man cannot themselves remain free. True are the great words of Kossuth: No nation can remain free with whom freedom is a privilege and not a principle. This preface was more or less widely copied in the twenty translations of the book that quickly followed its first appearance. These, arranged in the alphabetical order of their languages, are as follows: Armenian, Bohemian, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Flemish, French, German, Hungarian, Illyrian, Italian, Polish, Portuguese, Romaic or modern Greek, Russian, Servian, Spanish, Wallachian, and Welsh. In
A. Lawrence (search for this): chapter 11
ladies who took subscription papers at the meeting will undoubtedly raise two hundred dollars more. Before leaving New York, Mrs. Stowe gave Milly Edmondson her check for the entire sum necessary to purchase her own freedom and that of her children, and sent her home rejoicing. That this sum was made up to her by the generous contributions of those to whom she appealed is shown by a note written to her husband and dated July, 1852, in which she says:-- Had a very kind note from A. Lawrence inclosing a twenty-dollar gold-piece for the Edmondsons. Isabella's ladies gave me twenty-five dollars, so you see our check is more than paid already. Although during her visit in New York Mrs. Stowe made many new friends, and was overwhelmed with congratulations and praise of her book, the most pleasing incident of this time seems to have been an epistolatory interview with Jenny Lind (Goldschmidt). In writing of it to her husband she says-- Well, we have heard Jenny Lind, and
Jenny Lind (search for this): chapter 11
1853. The Edmondsons. buying slaves to set them free. Jenny Lind. Professor Stowe is called to Andover. fitting up the new home. bless you, my child! Well, I have received a sweet note from Jenny Lind, with her name and her husband's with which to head my subscriptint of this time seems to have been an epistolatory interview with Jenny Lind (Goldschmidt). In writing of it to her husband she says-- Well, we have heard Jenny Lind, and the affair was a bewildering dream of sweetness and beauty. Her face and movements are full of poetry and fhat, on Mrs. Stowe's account, as she was very desirous of hearing Jenny Lind. Mrs. Stowe! exclaimed Mr. Goldschmidt, the author of Uncle Te me to be, dear madam, Yours most truly, Jenny Goldschmidt, nee Lind. In answer to Mrs. Stowe's appeal on behalf of the Edmonsons, JeJenny Lind wrote:-- My dear Mrs. Stowe,--I have with great interest read your statement of the black family at Washington. It is with plea
Henry W. Longfellow (search for this): chapter 11
ndependent fisherman farmer, who in his youth sailed all over the world and made up his mind about everything. In his old age he attends prayer-meetings and reads the Missionary Herald. He also has plenty of money in an old brown sea-chest. He is a great heart with an inflexible will and iron muscles. I must go to Orr's Island and see him again. I am now writing an article for the Era on Maine and its scenery, which I think is even better than the Independent letter. In it I took up Longfellow. Next I shall write one on Hawthorne and his surroundings. To-day Mrs. Jewett sent out a most solemnly savage attack upon me from the Alabama planter. Among other things it says: The plan for assaulting the best institutions in the world may be made just as rational as it is by the wicked (perhaps unconsciously so) authoress of this book. The woman who wrote it must be either a very bad or a very fanatical person. For her own domestic peace we trust no enemy will ever penetrate int
Sampson Low (search for this): chapter 11
be roused to give us strength to cast out this mighty evil. Yours for the oppressed, H. B. Stowe. This harassing, brain-wearying, and heart-sickening labor was continued until the first of April, 1853, when, upon invitation of the Anti-Slavery Society of Glasgow, Scotland, Mrs. Stowe, accompanied by her husband and her brother, Charles Beecher, sailed for Europe. In the mean time the success of Uncle Tom's Cabin abroad was already phenomenal and unprecedented. From the pen of Mr. Sampson Low, the well-known London publisher, we have the following interesting statement regarding it-- The first edition printed in London was in April, 1852, by Henry Vizetelly, in a neat volume at ten and sixpence, of which he issued 7,000 copies. He received the first copy imported, through a friend who had bought it in Boston the day the steamer sailed, for his own reading. He gave it to Mr. V., who took it to the late Mr. David Bogue, well known for his general shrewdness and enterpri
Charles Munroe (search for this): chapter 11
ere knowing that I am to leave at last. I shall never find people whom I shall like better than those of Brunswick. As Professor Stowe's engagements necessitated his spending much of the summer in Brunswick, and also making a journey to Cincinnati, it devolved upon his wife to remain in Andover, and superintend the preparation of the house they were to occupy. This was known as the old stone workshop, on the west side of the Common, and it had a year or two before been fitted up by Charles Munroe and Jonathan Edwards Students in the Seminary. as the Seminary gymnasium. Beneath Mrs. Stowe's watchful care and by the judicious expenditure of money, it was transformed by the first of November into the charming abode which under the name of The Cabin became noted as one of the pleasantest literary centres of the country. Here for many years were received, and entertained in a modest way, many of the most distinguished people of this and other lands, and here were planned innume
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11