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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe. Search the whole document.

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Charles Sumner (search for this): chapter 11
arning from the New World to the Old. Madame George Sand reviewed the book, and spoke of Mrs. Stowe herself in words at once appreciative and discriminating: Mrs. Stowe is all instinct; it is the very reason she appears to some not to have talent. Has she not talent? What is talent? Nothing, doubtless, compared to genius; but has she genius? She has genius as humanity feels the need of genius,the genius of goodness, not that of the man of letters, but that of the saint. Charles Sumner wrote from the senate chamber at Washington to Professor Stowe: All that I hear and read bears testimony to the good Mrs. Stowe has done. The article of George Sand is a most remarkable tribute, such as was hardly ever offered by such a genius to any living mortal. Should Mrs. Stowe conclude to visit Europe she will have a triumph. From Eversley parsonage Charles Kingsley wrote to Mrs. Stowe:-- A thousand thanks for your delightful letter. As for your progress and ovati
Harriet Sutherland (search for this): chapter 11
en. I am preparing a Key to unlock Uncle Tom's Cabin. It will contain all the original facts, anecdotes, and documents on which the story is founded, with some very interesting and affecting stories parallel to those told of Uncle Tom. Now I want you to write for me just what you heard that slave-buyer say, exactly as he said it, that people may compare it with what I have written. My Key will be stronger than the Cabin. In regard to this Key Mrs. Stowe also wrote to the Duchess of Sutherland upon hearing that she had headed an address from the women of England to those of America:-- It is made up of the facts, the documents, the things which my own eyes have looked upon and my hands have handled, that attest this awful indictment upon my country. I write it in the anguish of my soul, with tears and prayer, with sleepless nights and weary days. I bear my testimony with a heavy heart, as one who in court is forced by an awful oath to disclose the sins of those dearest.
Chapter 8: first trip to Europe, 1853. The Edmondsons. buying slaves to set them free. Jenny Lind. Professor Stowe is called to Andover. fitting up th Stowe, accompanied by her husband and her brother, Charles Beecher, sailed for Europe. In the mean time the success of Uncle Tom's Cabin abroad was already phenomean edition. In authorizing the circulation of this work on the Continent of Europe, the author has only this apology, that the love of man is higher than the loveteresting to Europeans as those of America; for America is fast filling up from Europe, and every European has almost immediately his vote in her councils. If, theEuropean has almost immediately his vote in her councils. If, therefore, the oppressed of other nations desire to find in America an asylum of permanent freedom, let them come prepared, heart and hand, and vote against the institured by such a genius to any living mortal. Should Mrs. Stowe conclude to visit Europe she will have a triumph. From Eversley parsonage Charles Kingsley wrote to
Denmark (Denmark) (search for this): chapter 11
let them come prepared, heart and hand, and vote against the institution of slavery; for they who enslave man cannot themselves remain free. True are the great words of Kossuth: No nation can remain free with whom freedom is a privilege and not a principle. This preface was more or less widely copied in the twenty translations of the book that quickly followed its first appearance. These, arranged in the alphabetical order of their languages, are as follows: Armenian, Bohemian, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Flemish, French, German, Hungarian, Illyrian, Italian, Polish, Portuguese, Romaic or modern Greek, Russian, Servian, Spanish, Wallachian, and Welsh. In Germany it received the following flattering notice from one of the leading literary journals: The abolitionists in the United States should vote the author of Uncle Tom's Cabin a civic crown, for a more powerful ally than Mrs. Harriet Beecher Stowe and her romance they could not have. We confess that in the whole m
France (France) (search for this): chapter 11
s. buying slaves to set them free. Jenny Lind. Professor Stowe is called to Andover. fitting up the new home. the Key to Uncle Tom's Cabin. Uncle Tom abroad. how it was published in England. preface to the European edition. the book in France. in Germany. a greeting from Charles Kingsley. preparing to visit Scotland. letter to Mrs. Follen. Very soon after the publication of Uncle Tom's Cabin Mrs. Stowe visited her brother Henry in Brooklyn, and while there became intensely innited States should vote the author of Uncle Tom's Cabin a civic crown, for a more powerful ally than Mrs. Harriet Beecher Stowe and her romance they could not have. We confess that in the whole modern romance literature of Germany, England, and France, we know of no novel to be called equal to this. In comparison with its glowing eloquence that never fails of its purpose, its wonderful truth to nature, the largeness of its ideas, and the artistic faultlessness of the machinery in this book, G
Braunschweig (Lower Saxony, Germany) (search for this): chapter 11
e and finally set forth. Reaching New York she made her way to Mr. Beecher's house, where she was so fortunate as to find Mrs. Stowe. Now her troubles were at an end, for this champion of the oppressed at once made the slave woman's cause her own and promised that her children should be redeemed. She at once set herself to the task of raising the purchase-money, not only for Milly's children, but for giving freedom to the old slave woman herself. On May 29, she writes to her husband in Brunswick:-- The mother of the Edmondson girls, now aged and feeble, is in the city. I did not actually know when I wrote Uncle Tom of a living example in which Christianity had reached its fullest development under the crushing wrongs of slavery, but in this woman I see it. I never knew before what I could feel till, with her sorrowful, patient eyes upon me, she told me her history and begged my aid. The expression of her face as she spoke, and the depth of patient sorrow in her eyes, was be
America (Netherlands) (search for this): chapter 11
She had two very pretty quadroon daughters, with her beautiful hair and eyes, interesting children, whom I had instructed in the family school with my children. Time would fail to tell you all that I learned incidentally of the slave system in the history of various slaves who came into my family, and of the underground railroad which, I may say, ran through our house. But the letter is already too long. You ask with regard to the remuneration which I have received for my work here in America. Having been poor all my life and expecting to be poor the rest of it, the idea of making money by a book which I wrote just because I could not help it, never occurred to me. It was therefore an agreeable surprise to receive ten thousand dollars as the first-fruits of three months sale. I presume as much more is now due. Mr. Bosworth in England, the firm of Clarke & Co., and Mr. Bentley, have all offered me an interest in the sales of their editions in London. I am very glad of it, both
Nazareth, Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ction the proofs lie bleeding in thousands of hearts; they have been attested by surrounding voices from almost every slave State, and from slave-owners themselves. Since so it must be, thanks be to God that this mighty cry, this wail of an unutterable anguish, has at last been heard! It has been said, and not in utter despair but in solemn hope and assurance may we regard the struggle that now convulses America,--the outcry of the demon of slavery, which has heard the voice of Jesus of Nazareth, and is rending and convulsing the noble nation from which at last it must depart. It cannot be that so monstrous a solecism can long exist in the bosom of a nation which in all respects is the best exponent of the great principle of universal brotherhood. In America the Frenchman, the German, the Italian, the Swede, and the Irish all mingle on terms of equal right; all nations there display their characteristic excellences and are admitted by her liberal laws to equal privileges: every
Dutch (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
come prepared, heart and hand, and vote against the institution of slavery; for they who enslave man cannot themselves remain free. True are the great words of Kossuth: No nation can remain free with whom freedom is a privilege and not a principle. This preface was more or less widely copied in the twenty translations of the book that quickly followed its first appearance. These, arranged in the alphabetical order of their languages, are as follows: Armenian, Bohemian, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Flemish, French, German, Hungarian, Illyrian, Italian, Polish, Portuguese, Romaic or modern Greek, Russian, Servian, Spanish, Wallachian, and Welsh. In Germany it received the following flattering notice from one of the leading literary journals: The abolitionists in the United States should vote the author of Uncle Tom's Cabin a civic crown, for a more powerful ally than Mrs. Harriet Beecher Stowe and her romance they could not have. We confess that in the whole modern r
Orrs Island (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
l. I am so happy — so blessed! The literary work of this summer was directed toward preparing articles on many subjects for the New York independent and the National era, as well as collecting material for future books. That the Pearl of Orr's Island, which afterward appeared as a serial in the Independent, was already contemplated, is shown by a letter written July 29th, in which Mrs. Stowe says: What a lovely place Andover is! So many beautiful walks! Last evening a number of us made up his mind about everything. In his old age he attends prayer-meetings and reads the Missionary Herald. He also has plenty of money in an old brown sea-chest. He is a great heart with an inflexible will and iron muscles. I must go to Orr's Island and see him again. I am now writing an article for the Era on Maine and its scenery, which I think is even better than the Independent letter. In it I took up Longfellow. Next I shall write one on Hawthorne and his surroundings. To-day
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