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Helensburgh (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 12
nto the spirit of the hour. As we rode on, we found that the news of our coming had spread through the village. People came and stood in their doors, beckoning, bowing, smiling, and waving their handkerchiefs, and the carriage was several times stopped by persons who came to offer flowers. I remember, in particular, a group of young girls bringing to the carriage two of the most beautiful children I ever saw, whose little hands literally deluged us with flowers. At the village of Helensburgh we stopped a little while to call upon Mrs. Bell, the wife of Mr. Bell, the inventor of the steamboat. His invention in this country was at about the same time as that of Fulton in America. Mrs. Bell came to the carriage to speak to us. She is a venerable woman, far advanced in years. They had prepared a lunch for us, and quite a number of people had come together to meet us, but our friends said there was not time for us to stop. We rode through several villages after this, and met
Stratford, Conn. (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ev. Baptist W. Noel. It was a rainy, misty morning when I left my kind retreat and friends in Edinburgh. Considerate as everybody had been about imposing on my time or strength, still you may well believe that I was much exhausted. We left Edinburgh, therefore, with the determination to plunge at once into some hidden and unknown spot, where we might spend two or three days quietly by ourselves; and remembering your Sunday at Stratford-on-Avon, I proposed that we should go there. As Stratford, however, is off the railroad line, we determined to accept the invitation, which was lying by us, from our friend, Joseph Sturge, of Birmingham, and take sanctuary with him. So we wrote on, intrusting him with the secret, and charging him on no account to let any one know of our arrival. About night our cars whizzed into the depot at Birmingham; but just before we came in a difficulty was started in the company. Mr. Sturge is to be there waiting for us, but he does not know us and we
Belfast (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 12
took brother Charles from nine in the morning till two in the afternoon to read and answer them in the shortest manner; letters from all classes of people, high and low, rich and poor, in all shades and styles of composition, poetry and prose; some mere outbursts of feeling; some invitations; some advice and suggestions; some requests and inquiries; some presenting books, or flowers, or fruit. Then came, in their turn, deputations from Paisley, Greenock, Dundee, Aberdeen, Edinburgh, and Belfast in Ireland; calls of friendship, invitations of all descriptions to go everywhere, and to see everything, and to stay in so many places. One kind, venerable minister, with his lovely daughter, offered me a retreat in his quiet manse on the beautiful shores of the Clyde. For all these kindnesses, what could I give in return? There was scarce time for even a grateful thought on each. People have often said to me that it must have been an exceeding bore. For my part, I could not think
Glasgow (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 12
, I am sure I do not know; but that they were of the one blood which unites all the families of the earth, I felt. At Glasgow, friends were waiting in the stationhouse. Earnest, eager, friendly faces, ever so many. Warm greetings, kindly words. don't know. The amount of letters we found waiting for us here in Edinburgh was, if possible, more appalling than in Glasgow. Among those from persons whom you would be interested in hearing of, I may mention a very kind and beautiful one from iven in the smallest sums, often from the extreme poverty of the giver. The committee who collected it in Edinburgh and Glasgow bore witness to the willingness with which the very poorest contributed the offering of their sympathy. In one cottage ttended another soiree of the workingmen of Edinburgh. We have received letters from the workingmen, both in Dundee and Glasgow, desiring our return to attend soirees in those cities. Nothing could give us greater pleasure, had we time or strength
not sleep all night, and the next day I felt quite miserable. From Edinburgh we took cars for Aberdeen. I enjoyed this ride more than anything we had seen yet, the country was so wild and singular. In the afternoon we came in sight of the German Ocean. The free, bracing air from the sea, and the thought that it actually was the German Ocean, and that over the other side was Norway, within a day's sail of us, gave it a strange, romantic charm. It was towards the close of the afternoon thatGerman Ocean, and that over the other side was Norway, within a day's sail of us, gave it a strange, romantic charm. It was towards the close of the afternoon that we found ourselves crossing the Dee, in view of Aberdeen. My spirits were wonderfully elated: the grand scenery and fine, bracing air; the noble, distant view of the city, rising with its harbor and shipping,all filled me with delight. In this propitious state, disposed to be pleased with everything, our hearts responded warmly to the greetings of the many friends who were waiting for us at the station-house. The lord provost received us into his carriage, and as we drove along pointed out
Edgbaston (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 12
done? C. insisted that he should know him by instinct; and so, after we reached the depot, we told him to sally out and try. Sure enough, in a few moments he pitched upon a cheerful, middle-aged gentleman, with a moderate but not decisive broad brim to his hat, and challenged him as Mr. Sturge. The result verified the truth that instinct is a great matter. In a few moments our new friend and ourselves were snugly encased in a fly, trotting off as briskly as ever we could to his place at Edgbaston, nobody a whit the wiser. You do not know how pleased we felt to think we had done it so nicely. As we were drinking tea that evening, Elihu Burritt came in. It was the first time I had ever seen him, though I had heard a great deal of him from our friends in Edinburgh. He is a man in middle life, tall and slender, with fair complexion, blue eyes, an air of delicacy and refinement, and manners of great gentleness. My ideas of the learned blacksmith had been of something altogether m
Greenock (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 12
overwhelming kind. So many letters that it took brother Charles from nine in the morning till two in the afternoon to read and answer them in the shortest manner; letters from all classes of people, high and low, rich and poor, in all shades and styles of composition, poetry and prose; some mere outbursts of feeling; some invitations; some advice and suggestions; some requests and inquiries; some presenting books, or flowers, or fruit. Then came, in their turn, deputations from Paisley, Greenock, Dundee, Aberdeen, Edinburgh, and Belfast in Ireland; calls of friendship, invitations of all descriptions to go everywhere, and to see everything, and to stay in so many places. One kind, venerable minister, with his lovely daughter, offered me a retreat in his quiet manse on the beautiful shores of the Clyde. For all these kindnesses, what could I give in return? There was scarce time for even a grateful thought on each. People have often said to me that it must have been an exceed
Aberdeen (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 12
iverpool. welcome to Scotland. a Glasgow tea-party. Edinburgh hospitality. Aberdeen. Dundee and Birmingham. Joseph Sturge. Elihu Burritt. London. the Lord Maruit. Then came, in their turn, deputations from Paisley, Greenock, Dundee, Aberdeen, Edinburgh, and Belfast in Ireland; calls of friendship, invitations of all det, and the next day I felt quite miserable. From Edinburgh we took cars for Aberdeen. I enjoyed this ride more than anything we had seen yet, the country was so whe close of the afternoon that we found ourselves crossing the Dee, in view of Aberdeen. My spirits were wonderfully elated: the grand scenery and fine, bracing air;at before going to bed. The next morning — as we had only till noon to stay in Aberdeen — our friends, the lord provost and Mr. Leslie, the architect, came immediately after breakfast to show us the place. About two o'clock we started from Aberdeen, among crowds of friends, to whom we bade farewell with real regret. At Stone
Paisley (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 12
izzy and overwhelming kind. So many letters that it took brother Charles from nine in the morning till two in the afternoon to read and answer them in the shortest manner; letters from all classes of people, high and low, rich and poor, in all shades and styles of composition, poetry and prose; some mere outbursts of feeling; some invitations; some advice and suggestions; some requests and inquiries; some presenting books, or flowers, or fruit. Then came, in their turn, deputations from Paisley, Greenock, Dundee, Aberdeen, Edinburgh, and Belfast in Ireland; calls of friendship, invitations of all descriptions to go everywhere, and to see everything, and to stay in so many places. One kind, venerable minister, with his lovely daughter, offered me a retreat in his quiet manse on the beautiful shores of the Clyde. For all these kindnesses, what could I give in return? There was scarce time for even a grateful thought on each. People have often said to me that it must have been
Liverpool (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 12
Crossing the Atlantic. arrival in England. reception in Liverpool. welcome to Scotland. a Glasgow tea-party. Edinburgh hospitalibarrassing. Beginning with her voyage, she writes as follows:-- Liverpool, April 11, 1853. My dear children,--You wish, first of all, tot so dingy and muddy. As we are sailing up in the tender towards Liverpool, I deplore the circumstance feelingly. What does make this rior some time. Our carriage at last drove on, taking us through Liverpool and a mile or two out, and at length wound its way along the grav circle by whom we were surrounded. In the evening I went into Liverpool to attend a party of friends of the anti-slavery cause. When I w give them an opportunity. The next day was appointed to leave Liverpool. A great number of friends accompanied us to the cars, and a beat of his chamber, felt a desire to testify his sympathy. We left Liverpool with hearts a little tremulous and excited by the vibration of an
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