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Walden Pond (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
r twice, but as various occasions bring out the many sides. And her power of bringing out Mr. Emerson has doubled my enjoyment of that blessing to be in one house and room with him. Ms. In a fragment of diary, without date, all too short, preserved among the Fuller papers, we have a glimpse at these Concord interviews; but not at the very outset; rather, after time had mellowed the companionship and made it less exciting, but more wholly unconscious. In describing a long walk by Walden Pond, Margaret Fuller says of Mr. Emerson, He is a much better companion than formerly,--for once he would talk obstinately through the walk, but now we can be silent and see things together. Fuller Mss. III. 165. In another place she gives this striking glimpse of his personal appearance: It was raining hard and quite cold — he had on his blue cloak, falling in large straight folds; in that he looks as if he had come to his immortality as a statue. Fuller Mss. III. 183. Els
Groton (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
f sentiment unless I have seen it borne out by some proof, as in case of Mr. Emerson. It is so easy for a cultivated mind to excite itself with that tone! Fuller Mss. III. 281. More than a month later she writes to the Rev. F. H. Hedge, from Groton (November 30, 1834). With regard to Mr. Emerson, I had two reasons, if they may deserve to be so called, for wishing him to see my Tasso [translated from Goethe]. It gratified me that a mind which had affected mine so powerfully should be riendship: While I was with you, she says, you very justly corrected me for using too strong expressions on some subject. But there is no exaggeration in saying — I must be allowed to say — that I detest Mr. Robinson at this time, --he being her Groton pastor who had twice invited Mr. Emerson to preach there while she was away from home. In this same letter she speaks of i Nature, then just published, which he had sent her, and which she and Miss Anna Barker had also mutually presented to each
Southington (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ator of that family, and one of the most intimate personal friends of Mr. Emerson. Miss Hoar had been betrothed to Charles Emerson at the time of his early death, and lived all her subsequent life in the close vicinity of his more eminent brother, to whom she was as a younger sister. Being a constant visitor at his house, she was at times brought closely in contact with Margaret Fuller, o whom she thus records her judgment in a letter addressed to her friend, Miss H. L. Chappell, of Southington, Conn. Concord, April 3, 1839. My dear Hannah,--Both your letters found me at Mr. Emerson's, but I waited until I came home, to answer them. Miss Fuller has been there for a week past, and I have not yet learned the art of self-regulation so far as to be able to do anything when she is near. I see so few people who are anything but pictures or furniture, to me, that the stimulus of such a person is great and overpowering for the time. And indeed, if I saw all the people whom I think o
Concord (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
Memoirs,i. 201. In July, 1836, she visited him in Concord. He has left a record, in one of the most graphic at gifted and high-minded woman, Elizabeth Hoar, of Concord, sister of the judge and the senator of that familyfriend, Miss H. L. Chappell, of Southington, Conn. Concord, April 3, 1839. My dear Hannah,--Both your lettamong the Fuller papers, we have a glimpse at these Concord interviews; but not at the very outset; rather, aftm his. Fuller Mss. III. 175, 176. Her visits to Concord not only established intimacy with Mr. Emerson, buto volumes of those to Zelter, and writes, I look to Concord as my Lethe and Eunoi after this purgatory of distrt. It is a fine day for composition, were it not in Concord. But I trow the fates which gave this place ConcorConcord, took away the animating influences of Discord. Life here slumbers and steals on like the river. A very gooed him for a time from that ideal chimney-corner in Concord. Here one may easily differ from her; nevertheless
personal friends of Mr. Emerson. Miss Hoar had been betrothed to Charles Emerson at the time of his early death, and lived all her subsequent life in the close vicinity of his more eminent brother, to whom she was as a younger sister. Being a constant visitor at his house, she was at times brought closely in contact with Margaret Fuller, o whom she thus records her judgment in a letter addressed to her friend, Miss H. L. Chappell, of Southington, Conn. Concord, April 3, 1839. My dear Hannah,--Both your letters found me at Mr. Emerson's, but I waited until I came home, to answer them. Miss Fuller has been there for a week past, and I have not yet learned the art of self-regulation so far as to be able to do anything when she is near. I see so few people who are anything but pictures or furniture, to me, that the stimulus of such a person is great and overpowering for the time. And indeed, if I saw all the people whom I think of as desirable, and if I could help myself, I do n
I have seen (September, 1836), she writes meekly from Boston, My dear friend,--I may venture to say so, since you have subscribed yourself my friend, --but in a year or two it becomes Dear Waldo, at least. In this first letter there is a phrase which shows the honest beginning of their friendship: While I was with you, she says, you very justly corrected me for using too strong expressions on some subject. But there is no exaggeration in saying — I must be allowed to say — that I detest Mr. Robinson at this time, --he being her Groton pastor who had twice invited Mr. Emerson to preach there while she was away from home. In this same letter she speaks of i Nature, then just published, which he had sent her, and which she and Miss Anna Barker had also mutually presented to each other. To show Anna to Mr. Emerson was just then one of her strong desires. Soon the borrowing of books becomes a constant theme. On April 11, 1837, she returns him Goethe's letters to Merck and the first
J. W. Von Goethe (search for this): chapter 5
to Mr. Emerson, I had two reasons, if they may deserve to be so called, for wishing him to see my Tasso [translated from Goethe]. It gratified me that a mind which had affected mine so powerfully should be dwelling on something of mine, even though n one of her strong desires. Soon the borrowing of books becomes a constant theme. On April 11, 1837, she returns him Goethe's letters to Merck and the first two volumes of those to Zelter, and writes, I look to Concord as my Lethe and Eunoi aftemains, which she has ransacked pretty thoroughly, and The friend, with which she should never have done; also a volume of Goethe and one of Scougal, and she asks him on the outside of the note what these two worthies will be likely to say to one anothey journey side by side. She begs to keep for summer two volumes of Milton, two of Degerando, the seventh and eighth of Goethe's Nachgelassene Werke, besides one volume of Jonson and one of Plutarch's Morals. She also subscribes for two copies of
Chapter 5: finding a friend. The personal influence of Ralph Waldo Emerson was so marked, during Miss Fuller's early career, that a separate chapter may well be devoted to delineating it. The first trace of him that I have found among her voluminous papers is this from one of her lively and girlish letters to Mrs. Barlow, dated October 6, 1834. She describes an interview with the Rev. Dr. Dewey, who was, with herself, a guest at Mrs. Farrar's in Cambridge, and adds:-- He spoke with admiration of the Rev. W. Emerson, that only clergyman of all possible clergymen who eludes my acquaintance. But n'importe! I keep his image bright in my mind. Fuller Mss. i. 17. Again, she writes to another correspondent about the same time-- I cannot care much for preached elevation of sentiment unless I have seen it borne out by some proof, as in case of Mr. Emerson. It is so easy for a cultivated mind to excite itself with that tone! Fuller Mss. III. 281. More than a month late
Waldo Emerson (search for this): chapter 5
friend. The personal influence of Ralph Waldo Emerson was so marked, during Miss Fuller's early career, that a separate chapter may well be devoted to delineating it. The first trace of him that I have found among her voluminous papers is this from one of her lively and girlish letters to Mrs. Barlow, dated October 6, 1834. She describes an interview with the Rev. Dr. Dewey, who was, with herself, a guest at Mrs. Farrar's in Cambridge, and adds:-- He spoke with admiration of the Rev. W. Emerson, that only clergyman of all possible clergymen who eludes my acquaintance. But n'importe! I keep his image bright in my mind. Fuller Mss. i. 17. Again, she writes to another correspondent about the same time-- I cannot care much for preached elevation of sentiment unless I have seen it borne out by some proof, as in case of Mr. Emerson. It is so easy for a cultivated mind to excite itself with that tone! Fuller Mss. III. 281. More than a month later she writes to the Re
John Milton (search for this): chapter 5
idian in later messages. Mrs. Emerson does not love me, she says in one place, more than I love her. On May 30, 1837, she returns to Emerson, Coleridge's Literary remains, which she has ransacked pretty thoroughly, and The friend, with which she should never have done; also a volume of Goethe and one of Scougal, and she asks him on the outside of the note what these two worthies will be likely to say to one another as they journey side by side. She begs to keep for summer two volumes of Milton, two of Degerando, the seventh and eighth of Goethe's Nachgelassene Werke, besides one volume of Jonson and one of Plutarch's Morals. She also subscribes for two copies of Carlyle's Miscellanies. Later she writes (November 25, 1839) to ask him What is the Harleyan (sic) Miscellany ?--an account of a library? and says, I thought to send Tennyson next time, but I cannot part with him, it must be for next pacquet (sic). I have been reading Milnes; he is rich in fine thoughts but not in fin
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