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Ripley (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
and nobly. If so, you need not come yourself, but send me your two lectures on Holiness and Heroism. Let me have these two lectures, at any rate, to read while in Boston. But her prediction was fulfilled; if she followed her literary longings she must leave Providence, and so she did. Mr. Ripley had suggested to her to write a life of Goethe, but it ended in a translation of Eckermann's Conversations with that great man, prefaced by one of her Dial essays on the subject and published in Ripley's series of Specimens of German authors, probably without compensation. Her plans and purposes on retiring from her school are best stated in a letter to the Rev. W. H. Channing, not before published :-- Providence, 9th December, 1838. I am on the point of leaving Providence, and I do so with unfeigned delight, not only because I am weary and want rest, because my mind has so long been turned outward and longs for concentration and leisure for tranquil thought, but because I have here b
Concord (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
bles me to present the beginning and the end together. 1836, August 2d. Emerson called this morning and took me to Concord to pass the day. At his house I met Margaret Fuller (I had seen her once before this), and had some conversation with hearian churches. Margaret Fuller was ill for a time after reaching Providence, and wrote to Mr. Emerson in June, 1837: Concord, dear Concord, haven of repose, where headache, vertigo, other sins that flesh is heir to, cannot long continue. After Concord, haven of repose, where headache, vertigo, other sins that flesh is heir to, cannot long continue. After this came a period of unusual health, during which she wrote in great exhilaration to her friends. To Miss Peabody, for instance (July 8, 1837), she exulted in the glow of returning health, and then gave this account of the school:-- As to the Mills, on the Merrimack, there to be silent and enjoy daily wood-walks or boat excursions with her, --or else to go to Concord. As to Providence, she writes:-- I fear I have not much to tell that will amuse you. With books and pens I have, m
Jefferson City (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
them, they have so enlarged my practical knowledge. I now begin really to feel myself a citizen of the world. My plan lies clearer before my mind, and I have examined almost all my materials, but beyond this I have done nothing. I shall, however, have so soon an opportunity to tell you all that I will not now take time and paper. I attended last week, somewhat to the horror of Mr. Fuller, the Whig Caucus here, and heard Tristam Burges. It is rather the best thing I have done. Ms. Jefferson's correspondence bearing fruit again! With that impressed upon her, and her businesslike father in her mind, she shrank from a merely intellectual life, while she yet felt its charms. Her residence in Providence had made her a citizen of the world, and the best thing she had done there was to defy the disapproval of her employer and attend a caucus,--in those days a rare exploit for a woman. We see the same half-conscious impulse toward action manifested in one of her letters to her yo
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
Chapter 6: school-teaching in Boston and Providence. (1837-1838.) For a young American woman wr health to enter the Green Street School at Providence. Here, during the last winter, she has beenret Fuller was ill for a time after reaching Providence, and wrote to Mr. Emerson in June, 1837: Conrience. The year after Margaret Fuller left Providence, we find her writing to her brother Arthur, She went for occasional brief visits from Providence to Boston, and it may be well to insert a pathe magic lantern also. Ms. Writing from Providence, August 14, 1837, she lays plans for her sume she yet felt its charms. Her residence in Providence had made her a citizen of the world, and theollowed her literary longings she must leave Providence, and so she did. Mr. Ripley had suggested tov. W. H. Channing, not before published :-- Providence, 9th December, 1838. I am on the point ofl in that city came to nothing, and she left Providence for Boston in December, 1838. This was the [10 more...]
Cherokee, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
m which educated men are not exempt, and which are quite sure to visit highly-educated women. One lady said to her successor, Miss Jacobs, soon after her arrival at the school: Miss Fuller says she thinks in German; do you believe it? It was a discourteous question to a new-comer, who would naturally wish to keep clear of the feuds and the claims of her predecessor; but fortunately Miss Jacobs had ready tact, if Miss Fuller had not. Oh, yes! she said, I do not doubt it; I myself dream in Cherokee; which left her assailant discomfited. James Freeman Clarke has lately said in a sermon that he once went to see Margaret Fuller when she had been teaching in Providence for a year or two. She showed him two packages of letters which she had received from her pupils. These letters, said she, if you should read them, would show you the work I have been doing for my scholars. The first package contains the letters which they usually write to me after they have been in the school two or
Groton (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
the gift of intellect that of prudence, and when these are united in one person, success must follow in their train. April. Miss Fuller left town this week for Groton, where she intends passing a few weeks, for recruiting her health to enter the Green Street School at Providence. Here, during the last winter, she has been engahe remainder of my life in quite a different manner. But 1 foresee circumstances that may make it wrong for me to obey my wishes. Mother has sold her place at Groton, and as she is to leave it in April, I shall go home and stay three months at least. I dream of Elysian peace, of quiet growth, and other benefits no doubt well-ollar for quarter-hour lessons. That winter, however, as she tells him, she is too tired to take them at any price; she must rest; but she will give her younger sister lessons in German, and will teach Latin and composition to himself. This was her idea of resting, and thus she rested at Groton for the remainder of that winter.
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
innocent tale was told; investigation followed, and complete acquittal. My informant, herself to this day an eminently successful teacher, told me that she then learned the life-long lesson of treating children with a noble confidence. It is impossible for a teacher to write about teaching without disclosing her own theories and revealing her own experience. The year after Margaret Fuller left Providence, we find her writing to her brother Arthur, then teaching a district school in Massachusetts; and never had young teacher a better counselor. She tells him, for instance (December 20, 1840),-- The most important rule is, in all relations with our fellow-creatures, never forget that if they are imperfect persons they are immortal souls; and treat them as you would wish to be treated by the light of that thought. Beware of over-great pleasure in being popular or even beloved. As far as all amiable disposition and powers of entertainment make you so, it is a happiness,
Narragansett Bay (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
erely intellectual life, while she yet felt its charms. Her residence in Providence had made her a citizen of the world, and the best thing she had done there was to defy the disapproval of her employer and attend a caucus,--in those days a rare exploit for a woman. We see the same half-conscious impulse toward action manifested in one of her letters to her younger brothers, in which she describes with great fullness a visit to a French man-of-war, the Hercules, which had anchored in Narragansett Bay. She says, incidentally, I thought I much should like to command such a vessel, despite all the hardships and privations of such a situation. Fuller Mss. i. 635. When she wrote, years after, the oft-quoted passage in Woman in the Nineteenth Century, Let them be sea-captains, if they will, it may have been with this reminiscence in her mind. On March 1, 1838, she wrote to Mr. Emerson one of her most characteristic letters. I reproduce it from the manuscript, because it shows wh
Caroline Sturgis (search for this): chapter 6
t before I could get to Spinoza, somebody seized on me and carried me off to quite another S,--to supper. On the whole, it all pleased my eye; my fashionable fellow-creatures were very civil to me, and I went home, glad to have looked at this slide in the magic lantern also. Ms. Writing from Providence, August 14, 1837, she lays plans for her summer vacation, which is to begin with unmerciful tardiness on August 19. For her three weeks vacation she plans to visit, with her friend Caroline Sturgis, that delicious land of lotus-eating, Artichoke Mills, on the Merrimack, there to be silent and enjoy daily wood-walks or boat excursions with her, --or else to go to Concord. As to Providence, she writes:-- I fear I have not much to tell that will amuse you. With books and pens I have, maugre my best efforts, been able to do miserably little. If I cannot be differently situated, I must leave Providence at the end of another term. My time here has been full of petty annoyances,
William Henry Channing (search for this): chapter 6
But her prediction was fulfilled; if she followed her literary longings she must leave Providence, and so she did. Mr. Ripley had suggested to her to write a life of Goethe, but it ended in a translation of Eckermann's Conversations with that great man, prefaced by one of her Dial essays on the subject and published in Ripley's series of Specimens of German authors, probably without compensation. Her plans and purposes on retiring from her school are best stated in a letter to the Rev. W. H. Channing, not before published :-- Providence, 9th December, 1838. I am on the point of leaving Providence, and I do so with unfeigned delight, not only because I am weary and want rest, because my mind has so long been turned outward and longs for concentration and leisure for tranquil thought, but because I have here been always in a false position and my energies been consequently much repressed. To common observers I seem well placed here, but I know that it is not so, and that I h
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