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Browsing named entities in a specific section of C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874.. Search the whole document.

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Havre (France) (search for this): chapter 110
of 1857. After being sworn in for his second term, on the 4th of March, he yielded to the persuasion of his friends, who were unanimous in the opinion that nothing but rest and recreation could restore him; and on the 7th of March he sailed for Havre. Vii. He was no stranger in Europe. Throughout the British Islands, and on the Continent, all the great men in science, in literature, in jurisprudence, with the friends of humanity, were prepared to give him the most generous greeting. ature only one or two degrees in the year, and whose climate combines all the soft and genial influences so completely embraced in the term mezzo giorno, and far away from the fire-life Americans lead, he was now on the road to substantial recovery. After one more rapid dash through Italy, he reported himself in Paris to Dr. Brown-Sequard, who now pronounced him well. For a month he took the seabaths at Havre, and at the opening of Congress in December, he was once more in his Senatorial seat.
Venice (Italy) (search for this): chapter 110
ther personage, at a distant period, who, with precisely the same burden of winters, asserted the same supremacy of powers. It is the celebrated Dandolo, Doge of Venice, at the age of eighty-four, of whom the historian Gibbon has said, in words strictly applicable to our own Quincy: He shone, in the last period of human life, as galley, while the great standard of St. Mark was displayed before him. Before the form of our venerable head is displayed the standard of a greater Republic than Venice, thrilling with its sight greater multitudes than ever gazed on the standard of St. Mark, while a sublimer cause is ours than the cause of the Crusaders; for our y beautiful department of Art. Viii. After journeying leisurely through Switzerland, Germany, and the northern part of Italy, taking Berlin, Vienna, Munich, Venice, and Trieste en route, he reached Paris, where he made preparations for his immediate return to America. But in a medical conference held by Dr. Brown-Sequard, D
ere unanimous in the opinion that nothing but rest and recreation could restore him; and on the 7th of March he sailed for Havre. Vii. He was no stranger in Europe. Throughout the British Islands, and on the Continent, all the great men in science, in literature, in jurisprudence, with the friends of humanity, were prepare last to make one more, and, if necessary, a protracted effort for recovery. Consequently, on the 22d of May, the following year,—1858,—he once more embarked for Europe. At Paris he placed himself under the care of Dr. Brown-Sequard, the illustrious physiologist and specialist, who made a more thorough and analytical diagnosisormed that death would be the inevitable result of so rash an undertaking. Escaping, therefore, from all the excitements of Paris, which meant the excitements of Europe, he fled to Montpelier, in the south of France, where he led a life of absolute retirement. Every day he was cupped on the spine, and three-quarters of his time
Cresson (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
pon the brain, connected with weakness in the spinal column, would render any early recovery an impossibility. He became the guest of Francis P. Blair, at Silver Spring—within an easy carriage ride of Washington. In the fore part of July, he found himself well enough to go on to Philadelphia, where he received the kindest attention from the family of Mr. James T. Furness. At their invitation, he went with them to Cape May. Afterwards, under advice of Dr. R. N. Jackson, he was removed to Cresson, among the highlands of Pennsylvania. But no signs of immediate restoration appeared, and in the beginning of October he once more reached his home in Boston. This return he had postponed, at the earnest persuasion of his medical adviser, who foresaw that his entry to Boston would be attended with the greatest excitement, for the feeling which inflamed the people of Massachusetts, of indignation on the one side, and of the tenderest affection on the other, could not be repressed. Ii.
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
r the feeling which inflamed the people of Massachusetts, of indignation on the one side, and of th be repressed. Ii. The welcome which Massachusetts extended to her Senator on his return, wasability he was left sole representative of Massachusetts on the floor of the Senate, throughout monen the learned endowments of Cambridge, is Massachusetts thus,— but because, seeking to extend everw Liberty and Virtue sitting by his side. Massachusetts is not without encouragement in her own hig most for the cause of all. And now, when Massachusetts is engaged in a greater cause than that ofng and brutal Despotism, to behold sons of Massachusetts in sympathy, open or disguised, with the vhe American flag. Alas, that any child of Massachusetts, in wickedness of heart, or in weakness ofo another character, yet happily spared to Massachusetts, whose heart beats strong with the best blnce I hope to live, while, as a servant of Massachusetts, I avoid no labor, shrink from no exposure[2 more...]
Switzerland (Switzerland) (search for this): chapter 110
otracted with almost unabated vigor during the long period of sixteen years. To show the elasticity of Mr. Sumner's mind, and the strange power of recuperation his physical system possessed, he spent most of the time during the painful treatment he was subjected to, in the careful study of engravings; and thus with the assistance of the finest artists in Paris, he matured his connoisseurship in that exquisitely beautiful department of Art. Viii. After journeying leisurely through Switzerland, Germany, and the northern part of Italy, taking Berlin, Vienna, Munich, Venice, and Trieste en route, he reached Paris, where he made preparations for his immediate return to America. But in a medical conference held by Dr. Brown-Sequard, Dr. George Hayward, and the illustrious French practitioner, Dr. Trousseau, he was informed that death would be the inevitable result of so rash an undertaking. Escaping, therefore, from all the excitements of Paris, which meant the excitements of Eur
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
rd to see the scholarship which has been drawn from her cisterns, and the riches accumulated under her hospitable shelter, now employed to weaken and discredit that cause which is above riches or scholarship. It is hard, while fellow-citizens in Kansas plead for deliverance from a cruel Usurpation, and while the whole country, including her own soil, is trodden down by a domineering and brutal Despotism, to behold sons of Massachusetts in sympathy, open or disguised, with the vulgar enemy, quickening everywhere the lash of the taskmaster, and helping forward the Satanic carnival, when Slavery shall be fastened not only upon prostrate Kansas, but upon all the Territories of the Republic,— when Cuba shall be torn from a friendly power by dishonest force,— and when the slave-trade itself, with all its crime, its woe, and its shame, shall be opened anew under the American flag. Alas, that any child of Massachusetts, in wickedness of heart, or in weakness of principle, or under the delusi
Saint Marks (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 110
l the perils of war, so that the historian describes him, in words again applicable to our day, saying: In the midst of the conflict, the Doge, a venerable and conspicuous form, stood aloft, on the prow of his galley, while the great standard of St. Mark was displayed before him. Before the form of our venerable head is displayed the standard of a greater Republic than Venice, thrilling with its sight greater multitudes than ever gazed on the standard of St. Mark, while a sublimer cause is oursSt. Mark, while a sublimer cause is ours than the cause of the Crusaders; for our task is not to ransom an empty sepulchre, but to rescue the Saviour himself, in the bodies of his innumerable children,—not to dislodge the Infidel from a distant foreign soil, but to displace him from the very Jerusalem of our liberties. May it please your Excellency, I forbear to proceed further. With thanks for this welcome, accept also my new vows of duty. In all simplicity, let me say that I seek nothing but the triumph of Truth. To this I off
Munich (Bavaria, Germany) (search for this): chapter 110
s. To show the elasticity of Mr. Sumner's mind, and the strange power of recuperation his physical system possessed, he spent most of the time during the painful treatment he was subjected to, in the careful study of engravings; and thus with the assistance of the finest artists in Paris, he matured his connoisseurship in that exquisitely beautiful department of Art. Viii. After journeying leisurely through Switzerland, Germany, and the northern part of Italy, taking Berlin, Vienna, Munich, Venice, and Trieste en route, he reached Paris, where he made preparations for his immediate return to America. But in a medical conference held by Dr. Brown-Sequard, Dr. George Hayward, and the illustrious French practitioner, Dr. Trousseau, he was informed that death would be the inevitable result of so rash an undertaking. Escaping, therefore, from all the excitements of Paris, which meant the excitements of Europe, he fled to Montpelier, in the south of France, where he led a life of
France (France) (search for this): chapter 110
actitioner, Dr. Trousseau, he was informed that death would be the inevitable result of so rash an undertaking. Escaping, therefore, from all the excitements of Paris, which meant the excitements of Europe, he fled to Montpelier, in the south of France, where he led a life of absolute retirement. Every day he was cupped on the spine, and three-quarters of his time was spent on his bed or sofa, sleeping whenever he could, but finding his chief recreation in reading; although he would frequently attend the public lectures at the College, on History and Literature. Ix. No portion of the earth approaches nearer to the ideal of the invalid's paradise, than the south of France. Bordering on the Mediterranean, That tideless sea, Which ceaseless rolls eternally; whose waters vary in temperature only one or two degrees in the year, and whose climate combines all the soft and genial influences so completely embraced in the term mezzo giorno, and far away from the fire-life American
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