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Browsing named entities in a specific section of C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874.. Search the whole document.

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Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
of Mr. Sumner in the United States Senate, was then Governor of Massachusetts. On the 16th of January, on motion of Mr. Barry, a member ofashington. Mr. Sumner will find, on reaching the Capital, that Massachusetts, and even New England, is but a fraction of the United States; be taught. Again, we say, we do not yet despair of the Union. Massachusetts might have seated in the Senate a man far more objectionable thlection of Mr. Sumner will be regretted by all who wish the State of Massachusetts to stand where she has stood, nobly and firmly fixed in herlents and character, he is not the man best suited to represent Massachusetts in the Senate of the United States. We are not aware of any acurther acquaintance, we find ourselves mistaken. The people of Massachusetts, we are certain, did not wish Mr. Sumner's election. Put the qhis constituents shall dictate. He will be a Senator worthy of Massachusetts, legislating, as the Transcript truly says, for the whole count
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 21
e of this event. Mr. Sumner is a forcible and eloquent speaker, an apt scholar, a man of superior abilities, of polished address and extensive acquaintance with the men and events of his times, and he may become a statesman of mark in the political arena. He will probably act and work with the Whig Party on all questions but one, a vital and momentous one, it is true, as he will find when he gets to Washington. Mr. Sumner will find, on reaching the Capital, that Massachusetts, and even New England, is but a fraction of the United States; that there are interests besides hers to be looked after; that, under his oath of office, he is bound to legislate for the whole country, not a sectional part; that the constitutional rights of others must be respected; and all this his good sense will soon teach him, if he needs to be taught. Again, we say, we do not yet despair of the Union. Massachusetts might have seated in the Senate a man far more objectionable than Charles Sumner! Vive la
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 21
overnor of Massachusetts. On the 16th of January, on motion of Mr. Barry, a member of the House, the election of a United States Senator was taken up, and the contest lasted three months. The Daily Evening Transcript for that year gave the followev. Mr. Stone. The morning business was unimportant, and at 9. 30 the House proceeded to the twenty-fifth ballot for United States Senator, which resulted as follows: Whole number386 Necessary to a choice194 Charles Sumner192 R. C. Winthrop16n. Mr. Sumner will find, on reaching the Capital, that Massachusetts, and even New England, is but a fraction of the United States; that there are interests besides hers to be looked after; that, under his oath of office, he is bound to legislate fa single paragraph: After every species and degree of fluctuation, the contest for the choice of a Senator of the United States has terminated in the election of Charles Sumner by a single vote. Slender as is this majority, it becomes still mor
Xvii. The contest which resulted in the election of Mr. Sumner to the United States Senate the first time, by the Legislature of Massachusetts, in 1851, was one of the most protracted and memorable in the history of any State. Mr. Boutwell, who is now the colleague of Mr. Sumner in the United States Senate, was then Governor of Massachusetts. On the 16th of January, on motion of Mr. Barry, a member of the House, the election of a United States Senator was taken up, and the contest lasted three months. The Daily Evening Transcript for that year gave the following history of the great contest: The first ballot resulted as follows: Whole number394 Necessary to a choice98 Charles Sumner80 Robert C. Winthrop66 A second ballot failed to elect either candidate, and the matter was postponed for one week. On January 23d, the election came up again by assignment, and resulted in the same manner, Mr. Sumner receiving 187 votes, 192 being necessary to a choice. On the 26t
Robert C. Winthrop (search for this): chapter 21
ar gave the following history of the great contest: The first ballot resulted as follows: Whole number394 Necessary to a choice98 Charles Sumner80 Robert C. Winthrop66 A second ballot failed to elect either candidate, and the matter was postponed for one week. On January 23d, the election came up again by assignmense proceeded to the twenty-fifth ballot for United States Senator, which resulted as follows: Whole number386 Necessary to a choice194 Charles Sumner192 R. C. Winthrop168 Scattering26 Blanks1 At the conclusion of the ballot given above, it was discovered that two more votes had been cast than there were members presentould be more than one candidate named, all should be thrown out. The result was as follows: Whole number384 Necessary to a choice193 Charles Sumner193 Robert C. Winthrop66 Scattering25 Blank2 And Charles Sumner was declared elected. In the same issue of that journal, the following bright and pointed editorial appea
Nathan Hale (search for this): chapter 21
ice, he is bound to legislate for the whole country, not a sectional part; that the constitutional rights of others must be respected; and all this his good sense will soon teach him, if he needs to be taught. Again, we say, we do not yet despair of the Union. Massachusetts might have seated in the Senate a man far more objectionable than Charles Sumner! Vive la Republique! The next day after the election, the Daily Advertiser, then under the control of the well-known journalist, Mr. Nathan Hale, used the following severe language, which referred, however, to the coalition in the Legislature by which the election was secured, and having no reference to the personal fitness of Mr. Sumner for the position: It is the grossest outrage upon the feelings of the majority of the people of the State, by a combination between two minorities, which we have known to be perpetrated in any of the States of the Union. We regard the event as a most unfortunate one for the reputation of th
Bayard Taylor (search for this): chapter 21
his influence on that side. Not that he wished Mr. Sumner elected particularly, but because he could get Mr. Sumner's friends to vote for him for Governor next Fall. We believe that the patronage of the State has been brought to bear upon this election; that promises have been made which we shall watch closely to see if they are redeemed hereafter. The Post summed up the whole question in its characteristic way, with a bristling little paragraph: A Whig, who refused to support Gen. Taylor because he was not Whig enough; an agitator, who would sacrifice the safety of the Union by aggravating sectional animosity; an Abolitionist, who would treat the laws of the constitutional Legislature of his country as the colonists did the oppressive edicts of a tyrannical power! This is the political beauty the Coalition Democrats have voted for as a member of the United States Senate. The Commonwealth was the only paper in Boston who then saw in Mr. Sumner the great statesman of t
l votes previously, took this occasion to vote blank. Such a consummation had been foreseen, and an earnest protest was made against the secret ballot by Mr. Colby, of Boston, unfortunately without effect, and the election was lost by the craven skulking of some poor-spirited thing. We need hardly say that the election of Mr. Sumner will be regretted by all who wish the State of Massachusetts to stand where she has stood, nobly and firmly fixed in her loyalty to the American Union. The Atlas treated the matter with more calmness and candor: We have from the beginning opposed the election of Mr. Sumner. We believe that the Legislature has made a mistake in electing him. Though a gentleman of talents and character, he is not the man best suited to represent Massachusetts in the Senate of the United States. We are not aware of any acts of his which require payment at a price so great. He is a known scholar more than a statesman. He has studied the world in the closet, throu
didate named, all should be thrown out. The result was as follows: Whole number384 Necessary to a choice193 Charles Sumner193 Robert C. Winthrop66 Scattering25 Blank2 And Charles Sumner was declared elected. In the same issue of that journal, the following bright and pointed editorial appeared: The mountain that has been in labor for the last three months has brought forth, and Charles Sumner, Esq., has been elected for six years, from the 4th of March next, to succeed Mr. Webster in the Senate of the United States. This was consummated in the House of Representatives this afternoon, on the twenty-sixth ballot, by a vote of 193, being the exact number necessary in concurrence with the choice of the Senate, made in January last. This will be a sore disappointment to the Whig Party, who have a plurality of some 20,000 votes in the State; but the fates have so decreed, and so it must be. The die is cast, and the Whigs and the indomitable Democracy have lost the gam
Charles Sumner (search for this): chapter 21
. Mr. Boutwell, who is now the colleague of Mr. Sumner in the United States Senate, was then GovernWhole number384 Necessary to a choice193 Charles Sumner193 Robert C. Winthrop66 Scattering25 Blank2 And Charles Sumner was declared elected. In the same issue of that journal, the followie last three months has brought forth, and Charles Sumner, Esq., has been elected for six years, froountry ruined in consequence of this event. Mr. Sumner is a forcible and eloquent speaker, an apt se Senate a man far more objectionable than Charles Sumner! Vive la Republique! The next day afte from the beginning opposed the election of Mr. Sumner. We believe that the Legislature has made ainfluence on that side. Not that he wished Mr. Sumner elected particularly, but because he could gwas the only paper in Boston who then saw in Mr. Sumner the great statesman of the future, and it ga which has been so strikingly fulfilled: Mr. Sumner will go into the Senate unpledged to the mea[13 more...]
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