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Browsing named entities in Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1.

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Wendell Phillips (search for this): chapter 1
Publisher's Advertisement. These Speeches and Lectures have been collected into a volume at the earnest and repeated requests of the personal friends and the followers of Mr. Phillips. In committing them to the Publisher, he wrote:-- I send you about one half of my speeches which have been reported during the last ten years. Put them into a volume, if you think it worth while. Four or five of them ( Idols, The election, Mobs and education, Disunion, Progress, ) were delivered in shich takes its name from my illustrious friend, William Lloyd Garrison. The only liberty the Publisher has taken with these materials has been to reinsert the expressions of approbation and disapprobation on the part of the audience, which Mr. Phillips had erased, and to add one or two notes from the newspapers of the day. This was done because they were deemed a part of the antislavery history of the times, and interesting, therefore, to every one who shall read this book,--not now only, bu
William Lloyd Garrison (search for this): chapter 1
, relating to the murder of Lovejoy, was reported by B. F. Hallett, Esq. As these reports were made for some daily or weekly paper, I had little time for correction. Giving them such verbal revision as the interval allowed, I left the substance and shape unchanged. They will serve, therefore, at least, as a contribution to the history of our Antislavery struggle, and especially as a specimen of the method and spirit of that movement which takes its name from my illustrious friend, William Lloyd Garrison. The only liberty the Publisher has taken with these materials has been to reinsert the expressions of approbation and disapprobation on the part of the audience, which Mr. Phillips had erased, and to add one or two notes from the newspapers of the day. This was done because they were deemed a part of the antislavery history of the times, and interesting, therefore, to every one who shall read this book,--not now only, but when, its temporary purpose having been accomplished by t
James Redpath (search for this): chapter 1
bal revision as the interval allowed, I left the substance and shape unchanged. They will serve, therefore, at least, as a contribution to the history of our Antislavery struggle, and especially as a specimen of the method and spirit of that movement which takes its name from my illustrious friend, William Lloyd Garrison. The only liberty the Publisher has taken with these materials has been to reinsert the expressions of approbation and disapprobation on the part of the audience, which Mr. Phillips had erased, and to add one or two notes from the newspapers of the day. This was done because they were deemed a part of the antislavery history of the times, and interesting, therefore, to every one who shall read this book,--not now only, but when, its temporary purpose having been accomplished by the triumph of the principles it advocates, it shall be studied as an American classic, and as a worthy memorial of one of the ablest and purest patriots of New England. James Redpath.
E. P. Lovejoy (search for this): chapter 1
into a volume, if you think it worth while. Four or five of them ( Idols, The election, Mobs and education, Disunion, Progress, ) were delivered in such circumstances as made it proper I should set down beforehand, substantially, what I had to say. The preservation of the rest you owe to phonography; and most of them to the unequalled skill and accuracy, which almost every New England speaker living can attest, of my friend, J. M. W. Yerrinton. The first speech, relating to the murder of Lovejoy, was reported by B. F. Hallett, Esq. As these reports were made for some daily or weekly paper, I had little time for correction. Giving them such verbal revision as the interval allowed, I left the substance and shape unchanged. They will serve, therefore, at least, as a contribution to the history of our Antislavery struggle, and especially as a specimen of the method and spirit of that movement which takes its name from my illustrious friend, William Lloyd Garrison. The only liber
B. F. Hallett (search for this): chapter 1
it worth while. Four or five of them ( Idols, The election, Mobs and education, Disunion, Progress, ) were delivered in such circumstances as made it proper I should set down beforehand, substantially, what I had to say. The preservation of the rest you owe to phonography; and most of them to the unequalled skill and accuracy, which almost every New England speaker living can attest, of my friend, J. M. W. Yerrinton. The first speech, relating to the murder of Lovejoy, was reported by B. F. Hallett, Esq. As these reports were made for some daily or weekly paper, I had little time for correction. Giving them such verbal revision as the interval allowed, I left the substance and shape unchanged. They will serve, therefore, at least, as a contribution to the history of our Antislavery struggle, and especially as a specimen of the method and spirit of that movement which takes its name from my illustrious friend, William Lloyd Garrison. The only liberty the Publisher has taken w
J. M. W. Yerrinton (search for this): chapter 1
which have been reported during the last ten years. Put them into a volume, if you think it worth while. Four or five of them ( Idols, The election, Mobs and education, Disunion, Progress, ) were delivered in such circumstances as made it proper I should set down beforehand, substantially, what I had to say. The preservation of the rest you owe to phonography; and most of them to the unequalled skill and accuracy, which almost every New England speaker living can attest, of my friend, J. M. W. Yerrinton. The first speech, relating to the murder of Lovejoy, was reported by B. F. Hallett, Esq. As these reports were made for some daily or weekly paper, I had little time for correction. Giving them such verbal revision as the interval allowed, I left the substance and shape unchanged. They will serve, therefore, at least, as a contribution to the history of our Antislavery struggle, and especially as a specimen of the method and spirit of that movement which takes its name from my ill
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 1
re delivered in such circumstances as made it proper I should set down beforehand, substantially, what I had to say. The preservation of the rest you owe to phonography; and most of them to the unequalled skill and accuracy, which almost every New England speaker living can attest, of my friend, J. M. W. Yerrinton. The first speech, relating to the murder of Lovejoy, was reported by B. F. Hallett, Esq. As these reports were made for some daily or weekly paper, I had little time for correction. Phillips had erased, and to add one or two notes from the newspapers of the day. This was done because they were deemed a part of the antislavery history of the times, and interesting, therefore, to every one who shall read this book,--not now only, but when, its temporary purpose having been accomplished by the triumph of the principles it advocates, it shall be studied as an American classic, and as a worthy memorial of one of the ablest and purest patriots of New England. James Redpath.
and seeking new truths, was one of the most finished productions of the modern type of mind. Among his other subjects, winning for him constant admiration, may be mentioned Street life in Europe, Toussaint l'ouverture, Daniel O'Connell, and his eulogies on Theodore Parker and John Brown. Among his published writings, the following are noteworthy-The Constitution a pro-slavery Contract, 1844; Can Abolitionists vote or take office? 1845; Review of Spooner's Unconstitutionality of Slavery, 1847; Addresses, 1850; Review of Webster's seventh-of-march speech, 1850; Review of Kossuth's course, 1851; Defence of the Anti-slavery movement, 1851. All of these productions were received with approbation by the followers of his doctrines, but with bitter condemnation by all persons opposed to the principles which he espoused. Mr. Phillips left no complete collection of his works. In 1863 appeared this collection of his Speeches, Lectures, and letters. During the last years of his life, he
-The Constitution a pro-slavery Contract, 1844; Can Abolitionists vote or take office? 1845; Review of Spooner's Unconstitutionality of Slavery, 1847; Addresses, 1850; Review of Webster's seventh-of-march speech, 1850; Review of Kossuth's course, 1851; Defence of the Anti-slavery movement, 1851. All of these productions were received with approbation by the followers of his doctrines, but with bitter condemnation by all persons opposed to the principles which he espoused. Mr. Phillips left no1851. All of these productions were received with approbation by the followers of his doctrines, but with bitter condemnation by all persons opposed to the principles which he espoused. Mr. Phillips left no complete collection of his works. In 1863 appeared this collection of his Speeches, Lectures, and letters. During the last years of his life, he was engaged, at intervals, in the preparation of a second volume of addresses, and was also writing out the reminiscences of his own busy life. One of the greatest events of his later career was his appearance on June 30, 1881, before the Harvard Chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa, as the orator of the occasion. He might then have chosen a subject up
the dragon's teeth, from which sprang the armed men who alone were competent to the accomplishment of the great end to which the most valuable years of his life had been devoted. But Mr. Phillips could not remain idle. Restless energy was the motive power of his nature, and it soon forced him into other fields of labor. In turn he espoused the cause of the laboring-man, of prohibition, of the woman-suffragists, of prison-reform, of the paper-money advocates, and of the Irish cause. In 1870 the workingmen and the prohibitionists of Massachusetts nominated Mr. Phillips for governor of his native State. In the election of that year he received upwards of twenty thousand votes. The fact that he was a nominee for office in this instance stands clearly in contrast with the balance of his life, yet it is no exception. He led a forlorn-hope,--a handful of men fighting, not with any expectation of electing their candidate, but with the determination of emphasizing their beliefs by co
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