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Niagara County (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
having begun, they made thorough work. [Cheers.] It is an attribute of the Yankee blood,slow to fight, and fight once. [Renewed cheers.] It was a holy war, that for Independence: this is a holier and the last,--that for liberty. [Loud applause.] I hear a great deal about Constitutional liberty. The mouths of Concord and Lexington guns have room only for one word, and that is liberty. You might as well ask Niagara to chant the Chicago Platform, as to say how far war shall go. War and Niagara thunder to a music of their own. God alone can launch the lightnings, that they may go and say, Here we are. The thunderbolts of His throne always abase the proud, lift up the lowly, and execute justice between man and man. Now let me turn one moment to another consideration. What should the government do? I said thorough should be its maxim. When we fight, we are fighting for justice and an idea. A short war and a rigid one is the maxim. Ten thousand men in Washington! it is only
Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
mass, rushing from mere enthusiasm to A battle whose great aim and scope They little care to know, Content, like men-at-arms, to cope Each with his fronting foe. Behind that class stands another, whose only idea in this controversy is sovereignty and the flag. The seaboard, the wealth, the just-converted hunkerism of the country, fill that class. Next to it stands the third element, the people; the cordwainers of Lynn, the farmers of Worcester, the dwellers on the prairie,--Iowa and Wisconsin, Ohio and Maine,--the broad surface of the people who have no leisure for technicalities, who never studied law, who never had time to read any further into the Constitution than the first two lines,--Establish Justice and secure Liberty. They have waited long enough; they have eaten dirt enough; they have apologized for bankrupt statesmen enough; they have quieted their consciences enough; they have split logic with their Abolition neighbors long enough; they are tired of trying to find
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
e their power. War and tumult must conceal the irregularity of their civil course, and smother discontent and criticism at the same time. Besides, bankruptcy at home can live out its short term of possible existence only by conquest on land and piracy at sea. And, further, only by war, by appeal to popular frenzy, can they hope to delude the Border States to join them. War is the breath of t heir life. To-day, therefore, the question is, by the voice of the South, Shall Washington or Montgomery own the continent? And the North says, From the Gulf to the Pole, the Stars and Stripes shall atone to four millions of negroes whom we have forgotten for seventy years; and, before you break the Union, we will see that justice is done to the slave. [Enthusiastic and long-continued cheers.] There is only one thing those cannon-shot in the harbor of Charleston settled,--that there never can be a compromise. [Loud applause.] We Abolitionists have doubted whether this Union really meant
Lynn (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
ed than that. I divide you into four sections. The first is the ordinary mass, rushing from mere enthusiasm to A battle whose great aim and scope They little care to know, Content, like men-at-arms, to cope Each with his fronting foe. Behind that class stands another, whose only idea in this controversy is sovereignty and the flag. The seaboard, the wealth, the just-converted hunkerism of the country, fill that class. Next to it stands the third element, the people; the cordwainers of Lynn, the farmers of Worcester, the dwellers on the prairie,--Iowa and Wisconsin, Ohio and Maine,--the broad surface of the people who have no leisure for technicalities, who never studied law, who never had time to read any further into the Constitution than the first two lines,--Establish Justice and secure Liberty. They have waited long enough; they have eaten dirt enough; they have apologized for bankrupt statesmen enough; they have quieted their consciences enough; they have split logic with
France (France) (search for this): chapter 20
t to forts and national property goes with it. Granted. She says, also, that it is no matter that we bought Louisiana of France, and Florida of Spain. No bargain made, no money paid, betwixt us and France or Spain, could rob Florida or Louisiana ofFrance or Spain, could rob Florida or Louisiana of her right to remodel her government whenever the people found it would be for their happiness. So far, right. The people,--mark you! South Carolina presents herself to the administration at Washington, and says, There is a vote of my convention, foot in the Tuileries than he signed the edict abolishing the slave-trade, against which the Abolitionists of England and France had protested for twenty years in vain. And the trade went down, because Napoleon felt he must do something to gild the darkening hour of his second attempt to clutch the sceptre of France. How did the slave system go down? When, in 1848, the Provisional Government found itself in the Hotel de Ville, obliged to do something to draw to itself the sympathy and libera
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
wly, and execute justice between man and man. Now let me turn one moment to another consideration. What should the government do? I said thorough should be its maxim. When we fight, we are fighting for justice and an idea. A short war and a rigid one is the maxim. Ten thousand men in Washington! it is only a bloody fight. Five hundred thousand men in Washington, and none dare come there but from the North. [Loud cheers.] Occupy St. Louis with the millions of the West, and say to Missouri, You cannot go out! [Applause.] Cover Maryland with a million of the friends of the administration, and say: We must have our capital within reach. [Cheers.] If you need compensation for slaves taken from you in the convulsion of battle, here it is. [Cheers.] Government is engaged in the fearful struggle to show that 1889 meant justice, and there is something better than life, holier than even real and just property, in such an hour as this. And again, we must remember another thing,--th
ch; but Proclaim liberty throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof. [Loud cheers.] I said, civil war needs momentous and solemn justification. Europe, the world, may claim of us, that, before we blot the nineteenth century by an appeal to arms, we shall exhaust every concession, try every means to keep the peacade go down? When Napoleon came back from Elba, when his fate hung trembling in the balance, and he wished to gather around him the sympathies of the liberals of Europe, he no sooner set foot in the Tuileries than he signed the edict abolishing the slave-trade, against which the Abolitionists of England and France had protested fnists, who thank God that he has let them see his salvation before they die. [Cheers.] The noise and dust of the conflict may hide the real question at issue. Europe may think, some of us may, that we are fighting for forms and parchments, for sovereignty and a flag. But really the war is one of opinions: it is Civilization a
Concord, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
fathers did not think in 1775 of the Declaration of Independence. The Long Parliament never thought of the scaffold of Charles the First, when they entered on the struggle; but having begun, they made thorough work. [Cheers.] It is an attribute of the Yankee blood,slow to fight, and fight once. [Renewed cheers.] It was a holy war, that for Independence: this is a holier and the last,--that for liberty. [Loud applause.] I hear a great deal about Constitutional liberty. The mouths of Concord and Lexington guns have room only for one word, and that is liberty. You might as well ask Niagara to chant the Chicago Platform, as to say how far war shall go. War and Niagara thunder to a music of their own. God alone can launch the lightnings, that they may go and say, Here we are. The thunderbolts of His throne always abase the proud, lift up the lowly, and execute justice between man and man. Now let me turn one moment to another consideration. What should the government do? I
Worcester (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
you into four sections. The first is the ordinary mass, rushing from mere enthusiasm to A battle whose great aim and scope They little care to know, Content, like men-at-arms, to cope Each with his fronting foe. Behind that class stands another, whose only idea in this controversy is sovereignty and the flag. The seaboard, the wealth, the just-converted hunkerism of the country, fill that class. Next to it stands the third element, the people; the cordwainers of Lynn, the farmers of Worcester, the dwellers on the prairie,--Iowa and Wisconsin, Ohio and Maine,--the broad surface of the people who have no leisure for technicalities, who never studied law, who never had time to read any further into the Constitution than the first two lines,--Establish Justice and secure Liberty. They have waited long enough; they have eaten dirt enough; they have apologized for bankrupt statesmen enough; they have quieted their consciences enough; they have split logic with their Abolition neighb
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 20
usetts can finish up. [Cheers.] Blame me not that I make everything turn on liberty and the slave. I believe in Massachusetts. I know that free speech, free toil, school-houses, and ballot-boxes are a pyramid on its broadest base. Nothing that does not sunder the solid globe can disturb it. We defy the world to disturb us. [Cheers.] The little errors that dwell upon our surface, we have medicine in our institutions to cure them all. [Applause.] Therefore there is nothing left for a New England man, nothing but that he shall wipe away the stain which hangs about the toleration of human bondage. As Webster said at Rochester, years and years ago: If I thought that there was a stain upon the remotest hem of the garment of my country, I would devote my utmost labor to wipe it off. [Cheers.] To-day that call is made upon Massachusetts. That is the reason why I dwell so much on the slavery question. I said I believed in the power of the North to conquer; but where does she get it.
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