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Robert C. Winthrop (search for this): chapter 6
ax McSycophant, who all his life long has been bowing down to the Slave Power to secure the Presidency; willing to sacrifice his manhood for the promise of a mess of pottage, and destined to be outwitted at last. [Cheers.] Three cheers for the man who, after many great and swelling words against Texas, when finally the question of the Mexican war was before the Senate, did not dare to vote, but dodged the question, afraid to be wholly Southerner or Northerner, and striving in vain to outdo Winthrop in facing both ways. [Cheers.] Three cheers for the man who went into Virginia, and, under an October sun of the Old Dominion, pledged himself-the recreant New Englander!-to silence on the slave question; a pledge infamous enough in itself, but whose infamy was doubled when he broke it only to speak against the slave on the 7th of March, 1850. Three cheers for him [They were given, but so faintly, that a shout of derision went up from the whole audience.] Three cheers for the statesman wh
Whitefield (search for this): chapter 6
d back Thomas Sims,--pledged their individual aid to Marshal Tukey, in case there should be any resistance; it is because the merchants did it to make money. Thank God, they have not made any! [Great cheering.] Like the negro who went to hear Whitefield, and rolled in the dust in the enthusiasm of his religious excitement, until they told him it was not Whitefield, when he picked himself up, crying out, Then I dirty myself for nothing, so they dirtied themselves for nothing! [Tremendous cheerWhitefield, when he picked himself up, crying out, Then I dirty myself for nothing, so they dirtied themselves for nothing! [Tremendous cheering.] If only slave-hunting can save them, may bankruptcy sit on the ledger of every one of those fifteen hundred scoundrels who offered Marshal Tukey their aid I [Tumultuous applause.] There is one thing to be rejoiced at,--it is this: the fact that the police of this city did not dare even to arrest a fugitive slave, calling him such. The dogs of Marshal Tukey that arrested Thomas Sims in Richmond Street had to disguise themselves to do it,--dressed in the costume and called themselves wat
Daniel Webster (search for this): chapter 6
spoke to me, as a boy, through the lips of Quincy and Sullivan, of Webster and Otis, has sunk down to the miserable sophistry of this mountebheads to the great intellects, as they are called, of the land,--Mr. Webster and others. He tells us, that there are certain important intera man is worth more than a bank-vault. [Loud cheers.] I know Mr. Webster has, on various occasions, intimated that this is not statesmanslike, Dr. Dewey, to promise to return my mother to slavery; and, Mr. Webster, I prefer to be lean and keep my prejudices, to getting fat by seers for Charles Sumner. Overwhelming applause. Three cheers for Webster. Mr. Phillips continued:--] Faintly given, those last; but I d in respect to the gentleman whose name has just been mentioned [Mr. Webster]. It is said, you know, that when Washington stood before the sul have better evidence than the somewhat apocryphal assurance of Mr. Webster, at Marshfield, in 1848, that the North Star is at last discover
George Washington (search for this): chapter 6
e nothing, because a fugitive, within the last twelve months, had been taken out of Boston. They have done a great deal since, sixteen or seventeen years ago, Peleg Sprague, standing on this platform, pointed to this portrait, [the portrait of Washington,] and called him that slaveholder. It is not now considered a merit in Washington that he held slaves; men apologize for it now. I stood in this hall, sixteen years ago, when Abolitionist was linked with epithets of contempt, in the silver ton. Mr. Phillips continued:--] Faintly given, those last; but I do not much care, Mr. Chairman, which way the balance of cheers goes in respect to the gentleman whose name has just been mentioned [Mr. Webster]. It is said, you know, that when Washington stood before the surrendering army of Cornwallis, some of the American troops, as Cornwallis came forward to surrender his sword, began, in very had taste, to cheer. The noble Virginian turned to then and said, Let posterity cheer for us ; an
Francis Tukey (search for this): chapter 6
in the gray of the morning, while the awkward squad of Marshal Tukey stole down State Street with Thomas Sims, not deigning send back Thomas Sims,--pledged their individual aid to Marshal Tukey, in case there should be any resistance; it is because ery one of those fifteen hundred scoundrels who offered Marshal Tukey their aid I [Tumultuous applause.] There is one thinarrest a fugitive slave, calling him such. The dogs of Marshal Tukey that arrested Thomas Sims in Richmond Street had to disger, since the head of it has bowed his burly person to Francis Tukey's chain. [Cheers.] Did he not know that he was making yor Bigelow an honorable man and Mayor, and acknowledge Francis Tukey as Chief Justice of the Commonwealth. I prefer hunger cerity of Daniel Webster, or bending under the chain of Francis Tukey. [Tremendous cheering.] Sir, I have something to saers.] Mr. President, let me add one thing more. For Francis Tukey I have no epithet of contempt or of indignation. He ma
George Thompson (search for this): chapter 6
terwards, he was startled, in Italy, to hear, of a sudden, the rest of the tune come pealing forth. We were somewhat frozen up a while ago in this hall, with George Thompson on the platform; now we want the rest of the tune. [Laughter and cheers.] The Mail of this morning says that we have no right to this hall, because it wasn into bondage, that State Street and Milk Street might make money. Next we come to that man [John P. Bigelow] who stood at yonder door, looking on, while George Thompson was mobbed from this platform; who, neither an honorable Mayor nor a gentleman, broke at once his oath of office and his promise as a gentleman to give us thi his duties as City Marshal efficiently and well. I know he would, had he been present, have done his duty, and his deputy stood ready to do it that night in George Thompson's presence, if we had really had a Mayor, and not a lackey in the Mayor's chair. [Great laughter and cheering.] I find little fault, comparatively, with the
Wilmington, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
leaving them to find out, the next morning, that the great deed had been done, without their so much as hearing a noise. Soldiers asleep in Faneuil Hall, while mischief was doing so near as State Street? O what gallant soldiers they must have been! [Loud laughter and cheers.] Times have changed since we were here before. The last time I stood on this platform, there sat beside me a heroine worthy to sit in the hall of the old Huguenot,--one Elizabeth Blakeley, a mulatto girl, of Wilmington, N. C., who, loving freedom more than slavery, concealed herself on board a Boston brig, in the little narrow passage between the side of the vessel and the partition that formed the cabin,--two feet eight inches of room. There he lay while her inhuman master, almost certain she was on board the vessel, had it smoked with sulphur and tobacco three times over. Still she bore it. She came North, half frozen, in the most inclement month of the year,--this month. She reached Boston just able
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
to the most ultra, outside idea of liberty. It is a place for the running slave to find a shelter,--not for a recreant statesman. [Deafening cheers.] This hall has never been made ridiculous but once; never was made the laughing-stock of New England but once. That was about nine months ago, when the Sims brigade were left soundly asleep here, in the gray of the morning, while the awkward squad of Marshal Tukey stole down State Street with Thomas Sims, not deigning to ask their permissionther, fifty years hence, Massachusetts will not choose men with back-bones to send to Washington; not men who go there to yield up to the great temptations, social and political, of the capital, the interests and the honor of Massachusetts and New England. I believe, no matter whether the Abolitionists have done much or little, that the average of political independence has risen within the last ten or fifteen years. I know that strange sounds have been heard from the House of Representatives
Marblehead (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
of the Merchants' Bank. Let him discuss them over the bursting ledgers of Milk Street,--that is the place for dollar talks. But there is no room for dollars in Faneuil Hall. The idea of liberty is the great fundamental principle of this spot,--that a man is worth more than a bank-vault. [Loud cheers.] I know Mr. Webster has, on various occasions, intimated that this is not statesmanship in the United States; that the cotton-mills of Lowell, the schooners of Cape Cod, the coasters of Marblehead, the coal and iron mines of Pennsylvania, and the business of Wall Street are the great interests which this government is framed to protect. He intimated, all through the recent discussion, that property is the great element this government is to stand by and protect,--the test by which its success is to be appreciated. Perhaps it is so; perhaps it is so; and if the making of money, if ten per cent a year, if the placing of one dollar on the top of another, be the highest effort of huma
Connecticut River (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
en within the last ten or fifteen years. I know that strange sounds have been heard from the House of Representatives and the Senate within the last ten or fifteen years: that the old tone so often breathed there of Northern submission has very much changed since John Quincy Adams vindicated free speech on the floor of that House. I read just now a speech worthy, in some respects, of Faneuil Hall, from the lips of Robert Rantoul, in rebuke of a recreant Abolitionist from the banks of the Connecticut (George T. Davis). I know not what may be the future course of Mr. Rantoul on this question; I know not how erect he may stand hereafter; but I am willing to give him good credit in the future, so well paid has been this his first bill of exchange. [Great cheering.] He has done, at least, his duty to the constituency he represented. He looked North for his instructions. The time has been when no Massachusetts representative looked North; we saw only their backs. They have always looke
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