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Marblehead (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
of the Merchants' Bank. Let him discuss them over the bursting ledgers of Milk Street,--that is the place for dollar talks. But there is no room for dollars in Faneuil Hall. The idea of liberty is the great fundamental principle of this spot,--that a man is worth more than a bank-vault. [Loud cheers.] I know Mr. Webster has, on various occasions, intimated that this is not statesmanship in the United States; that the cotton-mills of Lowell, the schooners of Cape Cod, the coasters of Marblehead, the coal and iron mines of Pennsylvania, and the business of Wall Street are the great interests which this government is framed to protect. He intimated, all through the recent discussion, that property is the great element this government is to stand by and protect,--the test by which its success is to be appreciated. Perhaps it is so; perhaps it is so; and if the making of money, if ten per cent a year, if the placing of one dollar on the top of another, be the highest effort of huma
Russia (Russia) (search for this): chapter 6
om this hall for some time; and m getting here again, I prefer to go back to the old note, and try to get the hang of this school-house. [Laughter.] You know Baron Munchausen says, in one of his marvellous stories, that it was so cold one day in Russia, when he began to play a tune on his trumpet, that half of it froze in the instrument before it could get out; and a few months afterwards, he was startled, in Italy, to hear, of a sudden, the rest of the tune come pealing forth. We were somewhaone dollar on the top of another, be the highest effort of human skill; if the answer to the old Puritan catechism, , What is the chief end of man? is to be changed, as, according to modern state craft it ought to be, why, be it so. Nicholas of Russia made a catechism for the Poles, in which they are taught that Christ is next below God, and the Emperor of all the Russias is next below Christ. So, judging by the tenor of his recent speeches, Daniel has got a new catechism, What is the chief e
were better times then! She came here. Just able to stand, fresh from that baptism of suffering for liberty, she came her, We told her story. And with us that night — within ten feet of where I stand-sat Fredrika Bremer, the representative of the literature of the Old World; and her humane sympathies were moved so much, that the rosebud she held in her hand she sent (honoring me by sending it by my hand) to the first representative of American slavery she had seen. It was the tribute of Europe's heart and intellect to a heroine of the black race, in Faneuil Hall. Times have changed since. Not to speak of the incense which Miss Bremer has, half ignorantly, I hope, laid on the demon altar of our land, it would not be safe to put that Betsey Blakeley on this platform to-night; it would not be safe for her to appear in a public meeting. What has changed this public opinion? I wish it was some single man. I wish it was some official of the city, that so we could make him the scapeg
Connecticut River (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
en within the last ten or fifteen years. I know that strange sounds have been heard from the House of Representatives and the Senate within the last ten or fifteen years: that the old tone so often breathed there of Northern submission has very much changed since John Quincy Adams vindicated free speech on the floor of that House. I read just now a speech worthy, in some respects, of Faneuil Hall, from the lips of Robert Rantoul, in rebuke of a recreant Abolitionist from the banks of the Connecticut (George T. Davis). I know not what may be the future course of Mr. Rantoul on this question; I know not how erect he may stand hereafter; but I am willing to give him good credit in the future, so well paid has been this his first bill of exchange. [Great cheering.] He has done, at least, his duty to the constituency he represented. He looked North for his instructions. The time has been when no Massachusetts representative looked North; we saw only their backs. They have always looke
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
rs are to be discussed, let him discuss them with Franklin Haven, in the directors' room of the Merchants' Bank. Let him discuss them over the bursting ledgers of Milk Street,--that is the place for dollar talks. But there is no room for dollars in Faneuil Hall. The idea of liberty is the great fundamental principle of this spot,--that a man is worth more than a bank-vault. [Loud cheers.] I know Mr. Webster has, on various occasions, intimated that this is not statesmanship in the United States; that the cotton-mills of Lowell, the schooners of Cape Cod, the coasters of Marblehead, the coal and iron mines of Pennsylvania, and the business of Wall Street are the great interests which this government is framed to protect. He intimated, all through the recent discussion, that property is the great element this government is to stand by and protect,--the test by which its success is to be appreciated. Perhaps it is so; perhaps it is so; and if the making of money, if ten per cent
Wilmington, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
leaving them to find out, the next morning, that the great deed had been done, without their so much as hearing a noise. Soldiers asleep in Faneuil Hall, while mischief was doing so near as State Street? O what gallant soldiers they must have been! [Loud laughter and cheers.] Times have changed since we were here before. The last time I stood on this platform, there sat beside me a heroine worthy to sit in the hall of the old Huguenot,--one Elizabeth Blakeley, a mulatto girl, of Wilmington, N. C., who, loving freedom more than slavery, concealed herself on board a Boston brig, in the little narrow passage between the side of the vessel and the partition that formed the cabin,--two feet eight inches of room. There he lay while her inhuman master, almost certain she was on board the vessel, had it smoked with sulphur and tobacco three times over. Still she bore it. She came North, half frozen, in the most inclement month of the year,--this month. She reached Boston just able
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
[Loud cheers.] I know Mr. Webster has, on various occasions, intimated that this is not statesmanship in the United States; that the cotton-mills of Lowell, the schooners of Cape Cod, the coasters of Marblehead, the coal and iron mines of Pennsylvania, and the business of Wall Street are the great interests which this government is framed to protect. He intimated, all through the recent discussion, that property is the great element this government is to stand by and protect,--the test by perfection. I do not care whether the schooners of Harwich, under slaveholding bunting, catch fish and keep them or not; I do not care whether the mills of Abbott Lawrence make him worth two millions or one, whether the iron and coal mines of Pennsylvania are profitable or not, if, in order to have them profitable, we must go down on our marrow-bones and thank Daniel Webster for saving his Union, call Mayor Bigelow an honorable man and Mayor, and acknowledge Francis Tukey as Chief Justice of th
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ts melted by that eloquence, beneath which Massachusetts had bowed, not unworthily, for more than tlas! I said, if the party which has owned Massachusetts so long, which spoke to me, as a boy, throwent up one day into the Senate-chamber of Massachusetts, in which the Otises, the Quincys, and the State in the world,--the good old Commonwealth of Massachusetts,--and I stood there to see this img, the Faneuil Hall Whig, who came home to Massachusetts,--his own Massachusetts, the State he thouMassachusetts, the State he thought he owned, body and soul,--who came home to Massachusetts, and lobbied so efficiently as to secuMassachusetts, and lobbied so efficiently as to secure the election of Charles Sumner to the Senate of the United States. [Loud cheers.] [A voice: ry much doubt, whether, fifty years hence, Massachusetts will not choose men with back-bones to senhe capital, the interests and the honor of Massachusetts and New England. I believe, no matter wheaking, they have turned their faces toward Massachusetts. They reflect the public opinion of the S[3 more...]
Marshfield (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
in any amount of ridicule for the sake of antislavery; if we can fill yonder State-House with legislative action that shall vindicate the old fame of the State; if we can fill every town-house and school-house in the State with antislavery agitation,--then the eyes of every caucus and every political meeting, and of Congress, will all turn North, and, God willing, they shall see a North worth looking at. We will have better evidence than the somewhat apocryphal assurance of Mr. Webster, at Marshfield, in 1848, that the North Star is at last discovered. There will not only be a shrine, but worshippers. [Cheers.] I have not the voice to detain this meeting any longer. I am rejoiced to find myself again in Faneuil Hall. I am glad it has so happened that the very first meeting of the Massachusetts Antislavery Society since April 12th. 1851, has been within these walls, and that the first note of their rebuke of the city government, and of the Milk Street interest whose servant it st
Puritan (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
sylvania, and the business of Wall Street are the great interests which this government is framed to protect. He intimated, all through the recent discussion, that property is the great element this government is to stand by and protect,--the test by which its success is to be appreciated. Perhaps it is so; perhaps it is so; and if the making of money, if ten per cent a year, if the placing of one dollar on the top of another, be the highest effort of human skill; if the answer to the old Puritan catechism, , What is the chief end of man? is to be changed, as, according to modern state craft it ought to be, why, be it so. Nicholas of Russia made a catechism for the Poles, in which they are taught that Christ is next below God, and the Emperor of all the Russias is next below Christ. So, judging by the tenor of his recent speeches, Daniel has got a new catechism, What is the chief end of man? The old one of the Westminster divines, of Selden and Hugh Peters, of Cotton and the Mat
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