hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Wayland (Massachusetts, United States) 214 4 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child 155 1 Browse Search
John Brown 89 3 Browse Search
Charles Sumner 76 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 68 0 Browse Search
Kansas (Kansas, United States) 48 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 46 0 Browse Search
Henry A. Wise 41 1 Browse Search
William Lloyd Garrison 41 1 Browse Search
George Thompson 40 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall). Search the whole document.

Found 33 total hits in 15 results.

1 2
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
To E. Carpenter. March 20, 1838. I thought of you several times while Angelina was addressing the committee of the Legislature. Angelina Grimke, a native of South Carolina, and a member of the Society of Friends, addressed a committee of the Massachusetts Legislature on the subject of slavery in the House of Representatives, February 21, 1838, and on two subsequent days. She and her sister Sarah left their home and came to the North to reside because of their abhorrence of slavery, and they were the first women to speak in public against the system. Their testimonies, given from personal knowledge and experience, produced a profound impression, and large audiences gathered to listen to them wherever they went. I knew you would have enjoyed it so much. I think it was a spectacle of the greatest moral sublimity I ever witnessed. The house was full to overflowing. For a moment a sense of the immense responsibility resting on her seemed almost to overwhelm her. She trembled a
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
soever comes from the heart goes to the heart. I believe she made a very powerful impression on the audience. Boston, like other cities, is very far behind the country towns on this subject; so much so that it is getting to be Boston versus Massachusetts, as the lawyers say. The Boston members of the legislature tried hard to prevent her having a hearing on the second day. Among other things, they said that such a crowd were attracted by curiosity the galleries were in danger of being broken down; though in fact they are constructed with remarkable strength. A member from Salem, perceiving their drift, wittily proposed that a committee be appointed to examine the foundations of the State House of Massachusetts, to see whether it will bear another lecture from Miss Grimke. One sign that her influence is felt is that the sound part of the community (as they consider themselves) seek to give vent to their vexation by calling her Devil-ina instead of Angel-ina, and Miss Grimalkin
Quaker (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
l-ina instead of Angel-ina, and Miss Grimalkin instead of Miss Grimke. Another sign is that we have succeeded in obtaining the Odeon, one of the largest and most central halls, for her to speak in; and it is the first time such a place has been obtained for anti-slavery in this city. Angelina and Sarah have been spending the winter at the house of Mr. P--, about five miles from here. The family were formerly of the Society of Friends--are now, I believe, a little Swedenborgian, but more Quaker, and swinging loose from any regular society; just as I and so many hundred others are doing at the present day. I should like earnestly and truly to believe with some large sect, because religious sympathy is so delightful; but I now think that if I were to live my life over again I should not outwardly join any society, there is such a tendency to spiritual domination, such an interfering with individual freedom. Have you read a little pamphlet called George Fox and his first Disciples
York, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
d life in it then, for it was merely the outward expression or form of a vital principle. What is it now? An inherited formality, of which few stop to inquire the meaning. Thus have all human forms the seed of death within them ; but luckily when the body becomes dead, the inward soul or principle seeks a new form and lives again. The Friends as a society may become extinct; but not in vain did they cast forth their great principles into everlasting time. No truth they uttered shall ever die; neither shall any truth that you or I may speak, or express in our lives. Two centuries after William Penn brought indignation upon himself by saying thou to the Duke of York, the French revolutionists, in order to show that they were friends of equality, wrote in their windows, In this house we thou it. And this idea, dug up by the friends from the ashes of early Christianity, has in fact given rise to the doctrine of spiritual brotherhood, echoed and reechoed from Priestley to Channing.
f I were to live my life over again I should not outwardly join any society, there is such a tendency to spiritual domination, such an interfering with individual freedom. Have you read a little pamphlet called George Fox and his first Disciples ? I was charmed with it. Don't you remember I told you I was sure that the thou and thee of Friends originated in a principle of Christian equality? This pamphlet confirms my conjecture. In the English language of George Fox's time, and in most European languages now, thou was used only to familiars and equals. Kings say we, and nobles are addressed as you. The Germans carry this worshipful plurality to an absurd extent. The prince being missed by his companions on a hunting excursion, one of the noblemen asked a peasant, Hast thou seen the prince pass this way? No, my lord, replied the peasant, but their dog have passed. It was this distinction of language addressed to superiors, and to inferiors or equals, that the early Friends re
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
pression on the audience. Boston, like other cities, is very far behind the country towns on this subject; so much so that it is getting to be Boston versus Massachusetts, as the lawyers say. The Boston members of the legislature tried hard to prevent her having a hearing on the second day. Among other things, they said that such a crowd were attracted by curiosity the galleries were in danger of being broken down; though in fact they are constructed with remarkable strength. A member from Salem, perceiving their drift, wittily proposed that a committee be appointed to examine the foundations of the State House of Massachusetts, to see whether it will bear another lecture from Miss Grimke. One sign that her influence is felt is that the sound part of the community (as they consider themselves) seek to give vent to their vexation by calling her Devil-ina instead of Angel-ina, and Miss Grimalkin instead of Miss Grimke. Another sign is that we have succeeded in obtaining the Odeon
William Ellery Channing (search for this): chapter 26
d life in it then, for it was merely the outward expression or form of a vital principle. What is it now? An inherited formality, of which few stop to inquire the meaning. Thus have all human forms the seed of death within them ; but luckily when the body becomes dead, the inward soul or principle seeks a new form and lives again. The Friends as a society may become extinct; but not in vain did they cast forth their great principles into everlasting time. No truth they uttered shall ever die; neither shall any truth that you or I may speak, or express in our lives. Two centuries after William Penn brought indignation upon himself by saying thou to the Duke of York, the French revolutionists, in order to show that they were friends of equality, wrote in their windows, In this house we thou it. And this idea, dug up by the friends from the ashes of early Christianity, has in fact given rise to the doctrine of spiritual brotherhood, echoed and reechoed from Priestley to Channing.
George Fox (search for this): chapter 26
ightful; but I now think that if I were to live my life over again I should not outwardly join any society, there is such a tendency to spiritual domination, such an interfering with individual freedom. Have you read a little pamphlet called George Fox and his first Disciples ? I was charmed with it. Don't you remember I told you I was sure that the thou and thee of Friends originated in a principle of Christian equality? This pamphlet confirms my conjecture. In the English language of GeorGeorge Fox's time, and in most European languages now, thou was used only to familiars and equals. Kings say we, and nobles are addressed as you. The Germans carry this worshipful plurality to an absurd extent. The prince being missed by his companions on a hunting excursion, one of the noblemen asked a peasant, Hast thou seen the prince pass this way? No, my lord, replied the peasant, but their dog have passed. It was this distinction of language addressed to superiors, and to inferiors or eq
E. Carpenter (search for this): chapter 26
To E. Carpenter. March 20, 1838. I thought of you several times while Angelina was addressing the committee of the Legislature. Angelina Grimke, a native of South Carolina, and a member of the Society of Friends, addressed a committee of the Massachusetts Legislature on the subject of slavery in the House of Representatives, February 21, 1838, and on two subsequent days. She and her sister Sarah left their home and came to the North to reside because of their abhorrence of slavery, and they were the first women to speak in public against the system. Their testimonies, given from personal knowledge and experience, produced a profound impression, and large audiences gathered to listen to them wherever they went. I knew you would have enjoyed it so much. I think it was a spectacle of the greatest moral sublimity I ever witnessed. The house was full to overflowing. For a moment a sense of the immense responsibility resting on her seemed almost to overwhelm her. She trembled a
life in it then, for it was merely the outward expression or form of a vital principle. What is it now? An inherited formality, of which few stop to inquire the meaning. Thus have all human forms the seed of death within them ; but luckily when the body becomes dead, the inward soul or principle seeks a new form and lives again. The Friends as a society may become extinct; but not in vain did they cast forth their great principles into everlasting time. No truth they uttered shall ever die; neither shall any truth that you or I may speak, or express in our lives. Two centuries after William Penn brought indignation upon himself by saying thou to the Duke of York, the French revolutionists, in order to show that they were friends of equality, wrote in their windows, In this house we thou it. And this idea, dug up by the friends from the ashes of early Christianity, has in fact given rise to the doctrine of spiritual brotherhood, echoed and reechoed from Priestley to Channing.
1 2