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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall). Search the whole document.

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Wayland (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 75
To Miss Lucy Osgood. Wayland, 1857. I have lately been much interested about the young Kentucky lady Miss Mattie Griffith. who emancipated all her slaves, in consequence of reading Charles Sumner's speeches. She and I correspond, as mother and daughter, and I should infer from her letters, even if I knew nothing else about her, that she was endowed with a noble, generous, sincere, and enthusiastic nature. It is no slight sacrifice, at nineteen years old, to give up all one's property, and go forth into the world to earn her own living, penniless and friendless; but I shall earn my living with a light heart, because I shall have a clean conscience. I quote her own words, which she wrote in an hour of sadness, in consequence of being cut by friends, reproached by relations, and deluged with insulting letters from every part of the South. Her relatives resort to both coaxing and threatening, to induce her publicly to deny that she wrote the Autobiography of a female slave.
Charles Sumner (search for this): chapter 75
To Miss Lucy Osgood. Wayland, 1857. I have lately been much interested about the young Kentucky lady Miss Mattie Griffith. who emancipated all her slaves, in consequence of reading Charles Sumner's speeches. She and I correspond, as mother and daughter, and I should infer from her letters, even if I knew nothing else about her, that she was endowed with a noble, generous, sincere, and enthusiastic nature. It is no slight sacrifice, at nineteen years old, to give up all one's property, and go forth into the world to earn her own living, penniless and friendless; but I shall earn my living with a light heart, because I shall have a clean conscience. I quote her own words, which she wrote in an hour of sadness, in consequence of being cut by friends, reproached by relations, and deluged with insulting letters from every part of the South. Her relatives resort to both coaxing and threatening, to induce her publicly to deny that she wrote the Autobiography of a female slave.
David Lee Child (search for this): chapter 75
gize to the lady for her rudeness. Finding persuasion useless, he kept her in the garret three days on bread and water. It was of no use, the child always had the same answer. She is a cruel monster. It is the truth. I am not sorry I said it, and I can't say I am sorry. The grandfather's will gave up to the firmness of her conscientious convictions. M. never apologized. That early incident shows that she is of the stuff martyrs are. made of.... I suppose you have heard what a glorious time Mattie had when she emancipated her slaves. They danced and sang and sobbed, and would have kissed her feet, had she permitted. Then they began to think of her, and insisted upon continuing to send their wages to her, because she was not strong enough to work. When she refused, they pleaded hard to send her half their earnings. She wrote to me about it, and added, I assure you, dear Mrs. Child, there are very few people who know the real beauty of the African character. I believe it.
Mattie Griffith (search for this): chapter 75
To Miss Lucy Osgood. Wayland, 1857. I have lately been much interested about the young Kentucky lady Miss Mattie Griffith. who emancipated all her slaves, in consequence of reading Charles Sumner's speeches. She and I correspond, as mother and daughter, and I should infer from her letters, even if I knew nothing else about her, that she was endowed with a noble, generous, sincere, and enthusiastic nature. It is no slight sacrifice, at nineteen years old, to give up all one's property, and go forth into the world to earn her own living, penniless and friendless; but I shall earn my living with a light heart, because I shall have a clean conscience. I quote her own words, which she wrote in an hour of sadness, in consequence of being cut by friends, reproached by relations, and deluged with insulting letters from every part of the South. Her relatives resort to both coaxing and threatening, to induce her publicly to deny that she wrote the Autobiography of a female slave.
Lucy Osgood (search for this): chapter 75
To Miss Lucy Osgood. Wayland, 1857. I have lately been much interested about the young Kentucky lady Miss Mattie Griffith. who emancipated all her slaves, in consequence of reading Charles Sumner's speeches. She and I correspond, as mother and daughter, and I should infer from her letters, even if I knew nothing else about her, that she was endowed with a noble, generous, sincere, and enthusiastic nature. It is no slight sacrifice, at nineteen years old, to give up all one's property, and go forth into the world to earn her own living, penniless and friendless; but I shall earn my living with a light heart, because I shall have a clean conscience. I quote her own words, which she wrote in an hour of sadness, in consequence of being cut by friends, reproached by relations, and deluged with insulting letters from every part of the South. Her relatives resort to both coaxing and threatening, to induce her publicly to deny that she wrote the Autobiography of a female slave.
To Miss Lucy Osgood. Wayland, 1857. I have lately been much interested about the young Kentucky lady Miss Mattie Griffith. who emancipated all her slaves, in consequence of reading Charles Sumner's speeches. She and I correspond, as mother and daughter, and I should infer from her letters, even if I knew nothing else about her, that she was endowed with a noble, generous, sincere, and enthusiastic nature. It is no slight sacrifice, at nineteen years old, to give up all one's property, and go forth into the world to earn her own living, penniless and friendless; but I shall earn my living with a light heart, because I shall have a clean conscience. I quote her own words, which she wrote in an hour of sadness, in consequence of being cut by friends, reproached by relations, and deluged with insulting letters from every part of the South. Her relatives resort to both coaxing and threatening, to induce her publicly to deny that she wrote the Autobiography of a female slave.