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Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
, or at the works, or the factory. They still do in substance what the women did beneath the roof of King Alcinous; but instead of doing it as in those days, in return for home and protection and food, they do it for money. They are no longer under shelter; they are thrown out into the great, busy, bustling world; they make their own contract for wages, and collect these for themselves. They are as far as possible from the condition of perpetual tutelage which was, according to Sir Henry Maine, the recognized position of the Roman woman, following out more systematically the condition of her Greek sister. And this being the case, we must recognize the alteration. Our laws, our education, our social habits, must all adapt themselves to it. It is a curious fact that our word meretricious is derived directly from the Latin word meretrix, meaning a woman of degraded character; and that this again was derived from the seemingly harmless word mereo, to earn money. The assumption w
len must still be woven and made into garments, but it must be done away from home. Even the few arts of this kind that lingered longest beneath the cottage roof have almost or quite vanished. Hannah is no longer at the window binding shoes, or Delia braiding straw hats. Industry is systematized: Hannah and Delia go to labor at the shop, or at the works, or the factory. They still do in substance what the women did beneath the roof of King Alcinous; but instead of doing it as in those days,Delia go to labor at the shop, or at the works, or the factory. They still do in substance what the women did beneath the roof of King Alcinous; but instead of doing it as in those days, in return for home and protection and food, they do it for money. They are no longer under shelter; they are thrown out into the great, busy, bustling world; they make their own contract for wages, and collect these for themselves. They are as far as possible from the condition of perpetual tutelage which was, according to Sir Henry Maine, the recognized position of the Roman woman, following out more systematically the condition of her Greek sister. And this being the case, we must recogn
have now come within the domain of the shopkeeper. The sister would not weave or spin for her brother if he wished it; and he, in turn, would rather gratify her in any other way than by wearing garments of her spinning or weaving. The reign of Alcinous and his white-armed daughter has passed; the reign of store clothes has begun. The change seems inevitable, but it has driven women out of shelter. The linen and the woollen must still be woven and made into garments, but it must be done awar that opens may show you some modest young woman busy as a copyist or type-writer. Nobody thinks of it, nobody notices it; when her work is done she ties her bonnet under her chin and goes down the elevator and out of the door. In the days of Alcinous and Nausikaa such a mode of living would have been inconceivable; in the days of Fielding and Richardson it would have been the way to disgrace and destruction; now it is simply the normal state of things. What we do not see is that the freedom
Henry Fielding (search for this): chapter 2
y have women installed as book — keepers. Go into those great lives of men collected under one roof in a city for the pursuit of law, or brokerage, or business agencies, and any door that opens may show you some modest young woman busy as a copyist or type-writer. Nobody thinks of it, nobody notices it; when her work is done she ties her bonnet under her chin and goes down the elevator and out of the door. In the days of Alcinous and Nausikaa such a mode of living would have been inconceivable; in the days of Fielding and Richardson it would have been the way to disgrace and destruction; now it is simply the normal state of things. What we do not see is that the freedom in which the mass of women now live, and are destined to live, implies a very different mode of training, and a wholly different code of laws, from the time when there were but two positions supposable — out-doors for men, in-doors for women; from the time, in short, when women were not yet outside of the shelt
Samuel Richardson (search for this): chapter 2
y have women installed as book — keepers. Go into those great lives of men collected under one roof in a city for the pursuit of law, or brokerage, or business agencies, and any door that opens may show you some modest young woman busy as a copyist or type-writer. Nobody thinks of it, nobody notices it; when her work is done she ties her bonnet under her chin and goes down the elevator and out of the door. In the days of Alcinous and Nausikaa such a mode of living would have been inconceivable; in the days of Fielding and Richardson it would have been the way to disgrace and destruction; now it is simply the normal state of things. What we do not see is that the freedom in which the mass of women now live, and are destined to live, implies a very different mode of training, and a wholly different code of laws, from the time when there were but two positions supposable — out-doors for men, in-doors for women; from the time, in short, when women were not yet outside of the shelt
Edinburgh Review (search for this): chapter 2
II. outside of the shelter. Many years ago, in April, 1859, Harriet Martineau wrote an article on Female industry, in the Edinburgh Review, and stated very forcibly the wholly changed conditions of women's labor since the days when Adam delved and eve span. She called attention to the simple fact that a very large proportion of English women now earn their own bread, and that upon this changed condition the whole question must turn. A social organization, she said, framed for a community of which half staved at home while the other half went out to work cannot answer the purposes of a society of which a quarter remains at home while three-quarters go out to work. She pointed out that while it might formerly leave been true, as a rule, that men supported women, it was also true that this state of things had already ceased to be the general fact. Three millions out of six of adult English women work for subsistence, and two out of the three in independence. With this new cond
II. outside of the shelter. Many years ago, in April, 1859, Harriet Martineau wrote an article on Female industry, in the Edinburgh Review, and stated very forcibly the wholly changed conditions of women's labor since the days when Adam delved and eve span. She called attention to the simple fact that a very large proportion of English women now earn their own bread, and that upon this changed condition the whole question must turn. A social organization, she said, framed for a community of which half staved at home while the other half went out to work cannot answer the purposes of a society of which a quarter remains at home while three-quarters go out to work. She pointed out that while it might formerly leave been true, as a rule, that men supported women, it was also true that this state of things had already ceased to be the general fact. Three millions out of six of adult English women work for subsistence, and two out of the three in independence. With this new cond
Harriet Martineau (search for this): chapter 2
II. outside of the shelter. Many years ago, in April, 1859, Harriet Martineau wrote an article on Female industry, in the Edinburgh Review, and stated very forcibly the wholly changed conditions of women's labor since the days when Adam delved and eve span. She called attention to the simple fact that a very large proportion of English women now earn their own bread, and that upon this changed condition the whole question must turn. A social organization, she said, framed for a community of which half staved at home while the other half went out to work cannot answer the purposes of a society of which a quarter remains at home while three-quarters go out to work. She pointed out that while it might formerly leave been true, as a rule, that men supported women, it was also true that this state of things had already ceased to be the general fact. Three millions out of six of adult English women work for subsistence, and two out of the three in independence. With this new con
driven women out of shelter. The linen and the woollen must still be woven and made into garments, but it must be done away from home. Even the few arts of this kind that lingered longest beneath the cottage roof have almost or quite vanished. Hannah is no longer at the window binding shoes, or Delia braiding straw hats. Industry is systematized: Hannah and Delia go to labor at the shop, or at the works, or the factory. They still do in substance what the women did beneath the roof of King Hannah and Delia go to labor at the shop, or at the works, or the factory. They still do in substance what the women did beneath the roof of King Alcinous; but instead of doing it as in those days, in return for home and protection and food, they do it for money. They are no longer under shelter; they are thrown out into the great, busy, bustling world; they make their own contract for wages, and collect these for themselves. They are as far as possible from the condition of perpetual tutelage which was, according to Sir Henry Maine, the recognized position of the Roman woman, following out more systematically the condition of her Gree
April, 1859 AD (search for this): chapter 2
II. outside of the shelter. Many years ago, in April, 1859, Harriet Martineau wrote an article on Female industry, in the Edinburgh Review, and stated very forcibly the wholly changed conditions of women's labor since the days when Adam delved and eve span. She called attention to the simple fact that a very large proportion of English women now earn their own bread, and that upon this changed condition the whole question must turn. A social organization, she said, framed for a community of which half staved at home while the other half went out to work cannot answer the purposes of a society of which a quarter remains at home while three-quarters go out to work. She pointed out that while it might formerly leave been true, as a rule, that men supported women, it was also true that this state of things had already ceased to be the general fact. Three millions out of six of adult English women work for subsistence, and two out of the three in independence. With this new con