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Browsing named entities in A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864..

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Henry Warner Slocum (search for this): chapter 1
Preface. The author takes this earliest opportunity, to gratefully acknowledge his indebtedness to Comrade John W. Bell, for valuable material contributed by him to the first and last chapters of this work; to Comrades Bussey and Kenney, for interesting matter furnished; to Comrades S. H. Reynolds, D. W. Ellis, and others, whose active sympathy and warm interest have materially aided him; to Gen. H. W. Slocum, whose kind letter of recognition of the services of our company appears in this volume; and to Comrade Keefe, of the Grand Army record, for the favorable notice of the forthcoming of this history.
John W. Bell (search for this): chapter 1
Preface. The author takes this earliest opportunity, to gratefully acknowledge his indebtedness to Comrade John W. Bell, for valuable material contributed by him to the first and last chapters of this work; to Comrades Bussey and Kenney, for interesting matter furnished; to Comrades S. H. Reynolds, D. W. Ellis, and others, whose active sympathy and warm interest have materially aided him; to Gen. H. W. Slocum, whose kind letter of recognition of the services of our company appears in this volume; and to Comrade Keefe, of the Grand Army record, for the favorable notice of the forthcoming of this history.
O. B. Bussey (search for this): chapter 1
Preface. The author takes this earliest opportunity, to gratefully acknowledge his indebtedness to Comrade John W. Bell, for valuable material contributed by him to the first and last chapters of this work; to Comrades Bussey and Kenney, for interesting matter furnished; to Comrades S. H. Reynolds, D. W. Ellis, and others, whose active sympathy and warm interest have materially aided him; to Gen. H. W. Slocum, whose kind letter of recognition of the services of our company appears in this volume; and to Comrade Keefe, of the Grand Army record, for the favorable notice of the forthcoming of this history.
James W. Kenney (search for this): chapter 1
Preface. The author takes this earliest opportunity, to gratefully acknowledge his indebtedness to Comrade John W. Bell, for valuable material contributed by him to the first and last chapters of this work; to Comrades Bussey and Kenney, for interesting matter furnished; to Comrades S. H. Reynolds, D. W. Ellis, and others, whose active sympathy and warm interest have materially aided him; to Gen. H. W. Slocum, whose kind letter of recognition of the services of our company appears in this volume; and to Comrade Keefe, of the Grand Army record, for the favorable notice of the forthcoming of this history.
Stephen H. Reynolds (search for this): chapter 1
Preface. The author takes this earliest opportunity, to gratefully acknowledge his indebtedness to Comrade John W. Bell, for valuable material contributed by him to the first and last chapters of this work; to Comrades Bussey and Kenney, for interesting matter furnished; to Comrades S. H. Reynolds, D. W. Ellis, and others, whose active sympathy and warm interest have materially aided him; to Gen. H. W. Slocum, whose kind letter of recognition of the services of our company appears in this volume; and to Comrade Keefe, of the Grand Army record, for the favorable notice of the forthcoming of this history.
D. Warren Ellis (search for this): chapter 1
Preface. The author takes this earliest opportunity, to gratefully acknowledge his indebtedness to Comrade John W. Bell, for valuable material contributed by him to the first and last chapters of this work; to Comrades Bussey and Kenney, for interesting matter furnished; to Comrades S. H. Reynolds, D. W. Ellis, and others, whose active sympathy and warm interest have materially aided him; to Gen. H. W. Slocum, whose kind letter of recognition of the services of our company appears in this volume; and to Comrade Keefe, of the Grand Army record, for the favorable notice of the forthcoming of this history.
Preface. The author takes this earliest opportunity, to gratefully acknowledge his indebtedness to Comrade John W. Bell, for valuable material contributed by him to the first and last chapters of this work; to Comrades Bussey and Kenney, for interesting matter furnished; to Comrades S. H. Reynolds, D. W. Ellis, and others, whose active sympathy and warm interest have materially aided him; to Gen. H. W. Slocum, whose kind letter of recognition of the services of our company appears in this volume; and to Comrade Keefe, of the Grand Army record, for the favorable notice of the forthcoming of this history.
mpaign in Northern Mexico, he served upon the staff of Gen. Wool. He was on the staff of the commander-in-chief at Buena Vista, and for gallant and meritorious services in that battle, was brevetted first lieutenant. For several years prior to 1852, he was instructor in natural and experimental philosophy, at West Point Military Academy. He subsequently filled the same chair in the College of New York. He was engineer in charge of the Capitol at Washington, from November, 1859, to March, 1le military division. The general, who retired from the service in 1865, resides at Hartford, Conn. General Henry Warner Slocum Was born at Pompey, New York, September 24, 1827. He entered West Point Military Academy in 1848. Graduating in 1852, he was appointed second lieutenant of artillery. Three years later he was commissioned first lieutenant, and served in the Florida campaign of that year, against the Seminoles. In October, 1856, he resigned from the army and entered upon the pr
onn. General Henry Warner Slocum Was born at Pompey, New York, September 24, 1827. He entered West Point Military Academy in 1848. Graduating in 1852, he was appointed second lieutenant of artillery. Three years later he was commissioned first lieutenant, and served in the Florida campaign of that year, against the Seminoles. In October, 1856, he resigned from the army and entered upon the practice of law at Syracuse, N. Y. He was a member of the New York House of Representatives in 1859. Slocum was one of the first to tender his services to the general government at the outbreak of the Rebellion, and early in May, 1861, he was commissioned colonel of the Twenty-seventh New York Volunteers. This regiment he led in the battle of Bull Run, being severely wounded on the 21st of July. A few days later he was made brigadier general of volunteers, and during the winter of 1861, commanded the first brigade of Franklin's division. In May, 1862, upon the formation of the Sixth Cor
. Through the summer of 1864, on account of his wound, he was absent on sick leave. During this period Gen. Grant urged the appointment of Gen. Franklin to the command of the middle military division. The general, who retired from the service in 1865, resides at Hartford, Conn. General Henry Warner Slocum Was born at Pompey, New York, September 24, 1827. He entered West Point Military Academy in 1848. Graduating in 1852, he was appointed second lieutenant of artillery. Three years latrmy commanded by Gen. Slocum, was the first to enter Atlanta; thenceforth he participated in all the engagements of the march to the sea, and of the northward movement in pursuit of Johnston's army. Upon the disbandment of the volunteer forces in 1865, he resigned and resumed the practice of law, in his native state. He subsequently served in the Forty-first and Forty-second Congress, and is at present, 1886, a member of the National House of Representatives from southern New York. He resides
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