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Browsing named entities in a specific section of A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864.. Search the whole document.

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Bladensburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ove the bend, and made a camp with other companies of reserve artillery, which were here receiving instruction, while awaiting assignment to some division of the great army, which was then being organized. There were also several thousand cavalry encamped hard by; and, during the week of our sojourn, there was a grand review of the mounted troops, ten thousand, we should judge, our battery among them. We embraced an opportunity one day before our departure from this place, to run out to Bladensburg, four miles or more away, to see the boys of the First and Eleventh Massachusetts, Hooker's brigade then lying along the range of the northern fortifications of the Capitol, which we believe they had helped construct. These bronzed pioneers of the quota of our old Bay State were just coming in from drill, when we arrived, and experienced a lively surprise, no doubt, as we met their glance in passing. When they broke ranks there was a hearty handshaking and welcome. It was on the 12th
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
eme left, twenty-two miles below Washington on the east side of the Potomac; Heintzelman's division on the Mt. Vernon road below Alexandria; Sumner's and Franklin's on the right of Heintzelman, near Fairfax Seminary; McDowell's and Keyes's on the right of Franklin; then Porter's, and on his right, McCall's. East of the Blue Ridge there were no Federal troops in Virginia to the west of McCall; but on the Maryland side, in the vicinity of Edward's Ferry, was the division of Gen. Stone. At Harper's Ferry was Gen. Banks, and on his right, the division lately commanded by Lander. The evening of the 10th of March, 862, found our division at Fairfax, C. H., bivouacking east of the village. The advance meanwhile had reached Manassas Junction, to find it evacuated by the Confederates, who, under Gen. Joseph E. Johnson, had retired behind the Rapidan. We tarried three days, we believe, at Fairfax. The army headquarters, we remember, during most of this time, were in a large mansion north of
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
t of the rousing fires which the cold, night winds made extremely welcome. The comfortable night's sojourn in this quondam Confederate cantonment was a pleasant episode in our first severe march. The frost was working out of the red clay soil of this region, and the march of artillery was not made with such celerity as in later times in that year, and advancing too, it proved possible of attaining. Yet somehow on the 6th, it cut its way through the mud and the mire to Blackburn's Ford on Bull Run, crossed the tottering temporary bridge which had there been constructed, and drew over the broken land and plain to Manassas Junction. Those were three days fraught with interest which we spent in the village of log houses at the Junction, examining the abundant evidences of Confederate military architecture, field-works and barracks, and unearthing many a relic of their winter's sojourn at this place. We remember a quantity of wheat that some one discovered, which, though a trifle g
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
f snow, here and there, that night, with the bonfires which we kept burning; but one's back would chill, while his legs and chest were perspiring, as he stood beside the blaze. In the afternoon on the following day we forded Broad Run and were nearing Bristow station, when in obedience to orders we countermarched, returned to the north side of the river, and marched at as good pace as the condition of the fields permitted, toward Manassas. One says, We are going to join McClellan before Yorktown. Two days later, we were near Cloud's Mills and approaching Alexandria. Roster. Gen. W. B. Franklin's Division. Autumn and winter of 1861. Cavalry. Col. Mcwilliams, 1st New York Volunteers (Lincoln Cavalry). Infantry. First Brigade.—Gen. H. W. Slocum, 16th New York, 27th New York, 5th Maine, 96th Pennsylvania. Second Brigade.—Gen. Jno. Newton, 18th New York, 31st New York, 32d New York, 95th Pennsylvania (Gosline Zouaves). Third Brigade.—Gen. Philip Kearney, 1s<
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 4
s, has long since been removed; but the old armory building in Cooper Street still remains, where one hundred of our number, having been found physically qualified, were, on the 28th of August, 1861, mustered into the volunteer service of the United States, for the period of three years or during the war. Receiving at this place our fatigue uniforms, knapsacks, and blankets, we proceeded that afternoon to Camp Cameron, North Cambridge. This was on a farm extending from the old Lexington pike, ne, 96th Pennsylvania. Second Brigade.—Gen. Jno. Newton, 18th New York, 31st New York, 32d New York, 95th Pennsylvania (Gosline Zouaves). Third Brigade.—Gen. Philip Kearney, 1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th New Jersey Volunteers. Artillery. Platt's Battery D, 2d United States, 6 Napoleon Guns. Porter's A, Massachusetts, 4 10-pd. Parrott Guns; 2 12-pd. Howitzer Guns. Hexamer's A, New Jersey, 4 1–pd. Parrott Guns; 2 12-pd. Howitzer Guns. Wilson's F, New York, 4 3-in. Ordnance
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
as contributions to some of the grandest pages of the history of our first century. In the summer of 1861, the old Boston Light Artillery had returned to Massachusetts, its three months term of enlistment, under the 75,000 call, having expired. Josiah Porter of Cambridge, an experienced officer of the old battery of the Massts officers selected from the practised numbers of that efficient corps. This, in brief, was the origin of the first battery of light artillery recruited in Massachusetts in response to the 500,000 call. The little recruiting office, then situated on Hanover Street, where the majority of the original number comprising this coBrigade.—Gen. Philip Kearney, 1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th New Jersey Volunteers. Artillery. Platt's Battery D, 2d United States, 6 Napoleon Guns. Porter's A, Massachusetts, 4 10-pd. Parrott Guns; 2 12-pd. Howitzer Guns. Hexamer's A, New Jersey, 4 1–pd. Parrott Guns; 2 12-pd. Howitzer Guns. Wilson's F, New York, 4 3-in.
Fairfax (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
Chapter 1: Camp Cameron departure for the front sojourn in Washington Army life in autumn and winter of 1861 in Fairfax County, Virginia to Broad Run with McDowell roster of Gen. Franklin's Division The name of the literature of the great Civil War is Legion. During the two decades since our muster out as voluel,—at last to conquer. We had been assigned to Gen. Franklin's division, which was then lying about four miles northwest of Alexandria, on the borders of Fairfax County, the division headquarters being at Fairfax Seminary, the New Jersey brigade then commanded by Gen. Kearney, and the First New York Cavalry, lying upon the slge, specification, finding, and sentence of the court martial: Wm. Johnson of the First New York Volunteer Cavalry had left his post on cavalry picket in Fairfax County, Virginia; had attempted to pass within the Confederate lines; and had communicated to a supposed Confederate officer, accompanied by his staff, information which
Seminary hill (Washington, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
g about four miles northwest of Alexandria, on the borders of Fairfax County, the division headquarters being at Fairfax Seminary, the New Jersey brigade then commanded by Gen. Kearney, and the First New York Cavalry, lying upon the slope of Seminary Hill, south of the Leesburg pike, a brigade commanded by Gen. Newton located along the pike north of the seminary, and a brigade commanded by Gen. Slocum lying northeast of Newton's brigade, and north of the pike, the camp of its nearest regiment,chairman of the House Committee on the Conduct of the War, of the Thirty-seventh Congress, a Massachusetts man. At morning roll-call one day in November we were informed that the division would be marshalled upon the long field north of Seminary Hill, at the right of the Leesburg turnpike, to witness a military execution; the position of each regiment of infantry, the cavalry, and each of the four batteries, was defined, the route of the general and staff, the ambulance and coffin, the wa
Quiquechan River (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
r sisters, and some from sweethearts,—nearly all leaving quiet and happy New England homes behind,—lingering adieus were said, and the First Massachusetts Light Battery, composed of five officers and one hundred and fifty-two men, was on its journey to the scene of action in Virginia. Many of those brave hearts had said their last farewell. They were destined to see their loved ones no more,—no more to share the comforts and blessings from which they had separated. Taking steamer at Fall River and reaching New York the following morning, we camped on the Battery near Castle Garden; remaining there until the afternoon, we marched to Washington Square, thence down Broadway, enthusiastic greetings being extended to us. In the evening of this day we embarked upon a steamer for South Amboy, New Jersey; reaching that place, proceeded across the state to Philadelphia via Camden. In these days the patriotic ladies of Philadelphia maintained a refreshment room near the station of the <
Alleghany River (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ion volunteers who were passing to the front through the Quaker city, and here, ministered to by some of these motherly dames, we breakfasted on the 5th of October. There was opportunity, of which some comrades availed themselves, to write home. There was a musical tribute rendered by a chorus of our comrades while waiting for the train, in appreciation of the attentions of the ladies; then adieus, and departure for Washington; through Wilmington before noon, and on to the bank of the Susquehanna. There, awaiting our train, was the huge railroad ferry-boat, the Constitution, the bridge from Port Deposit to Havre de Grace having been burned; this was said to be the vessel that conveyed Gen. Butler and his command to Annapolis when he took possession of that city in the previous spring. It was a a novel sight, the transportation of a train of freight and passenger cars with locomotive over the ferry. Late in the afternoon we arrived at the Baltimore station of this road, and then
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