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r tribute to the value of this essay came to the author in a letter from a thoughtful friend, who said, I think it was one of the influences that opened Michigan University to women, and has now invited a woman professor on the same terms as men. The anonymousness of the Atlantic essays caused some amusing mistakes, as when Mrs. C. H. Dall was many times congratulated on having written Mademoiselle and her Campaigns. Finally she discovered the author, and wrote to him that no one except Macaulay could have written a better magazine article, and his would have been half lies. Mr. Higginson himself wrote to Harriet Prescott: . . . I had more [letters] about April Days than about anything I have written—sick women, young farmers, etc. One odd anonymous person, signing Su Su, sent me a root of double bloodroot postmarked Snow's Store, Vt. It seemed pretty that bloodroot should come out of Snow's Store— though I suppose the donor never thought of it. I have a piece almost re
Samuel Johnson (search for this): chapter 9
print what does not in some degree satisfy my own conception of literary execution. And the joy he found in literature is thus expressed:— Nothing but Haydon's jubilees over his great canvas up can describe my delight when I get a new budget of notes and materials into a fresh portfolio, and begin upon a new picture. In regard to the publication of the book of sea poems, profanely called the Marine Sam-Book in distinction from the hymn-book compiled by Messrs. Longfellow and Johnson, and popularly known as the Sam-Book, Mr. Higginson wrote to a friend:— The best result of S. L.'s [Samuel Longfellow] visit [to Europe] was to transform Thalatta from a past vision to a future reality. . . . We planned it six years ago and now Europe has revived it all in Sam and he has proposed it once more to James T. Fields (Ticknor & Co.) and that bold youth (also fresh from Europe, these two having visited the Brownings together) consented. So the book is to begin to be printed
him to write such papers. Tell me how much liquid, he asked, I must exchange for such a flow of thoughts—how much pepper must be forsaken to leave such spice of wit? How much pie crust must be sacrificed for such a crispness of style? This striking essay was at first considered by James Russell Lowell, then editor of the Atlantic Monthly, as too radical for that magazine, but he afterwards decided to insert it. In the diary of 1890, Mr. Higginson wrote, Much gratified at letter from Miss Eastman telling me from Dr.——that my Ought Women was really the seed of Smith College. A further tribute to the value of this essay came to the author in a letter from a thoughtful friend, who said, I think it was one of the influences that opened Michigan University to women, and has now invited a woman professor on the same terms as men. The anonymousness of the Atlantic essays caused some amusing mistakes, as when Mrs. C. H. Dall was many times congratulated on having written Mademoiselle<
to the publication of the book of sea poems, profanely called the Marine Sam-Book in distinction from the hymn-book compiled by Messrs. Longfellow and Johnson, and popularly known as the Sam-Book, Mr. Higginson wrote to a friend:— The best result of S. L.'s [Samuel Longfellow] visit [to Europe] was to transform Thalatta from a past vision to a future reality. . . . We planned it six years ago and now Europe has revived it all in Sam and he has proposed it once more to James T. Fields (Ticknor & Co.) and that bold youth (also fresh from Europe, these two having visited the Brownings together) consented. So the book is to begin to be printed in February and between now and then what copying and debating and selecting! In 1859, the famous Atlantic dinner was given to Mrs. Stowe, which Colonel Higginson has described in Cheerful Yesterdays. To his mother he thus reported a conversation on this occasion with Dr. Holmes:— He [Holmes] was very pleasant and cordial to me, but
ch individual person being entirely different from anything they had seen before. In Mr. Higginson's Atlantic paper, Fayal and the Portuguese (1860), these strange experiences were described. And it was in Fayal that Mr. Higginson wrote his essay called the Sympathy of Religions. This paper was afterwards read by the author before the Free Religious Association in Boston, and later before the Parliament of Religions at Chicago in 1893. It was reprinted in England and also translated into French. While in Fayal, he was delighted to receive a charming letter from Agassiz, begging me to collect corals, starfishes, etc., of which I already have a store. And after his return, he reported:— I spent part of yesterday with Prof. Agassiz and enjoyed it very much, and he was delighted with my collection from the Azores especially the sea-urchins, of which he found eight species, some of them new. Some of the things he is to return to me, labelled, for the [Worcester] Natural Histor
D. A. Sargent (search for this): chapter 9
articles will all be anonymous. In answer, he wrote: I gladly contribute my name to the list of writers. . . I am very much absorbed by necessary writing, speaking, and studies, and it is hard to do collateral work. The essays which Mr. Higginson contributed to the early numbers of the Atlantic attracted a great deal of attention. A Charge with Prince Rupert was considered one of the most brilliant of these early papers; while the first one, Saints and their Bodies, so impressed Dr. D. A. Sargent, afterward director of the Harvard Gymnasium, that he was led to adopt physical training as a profession. In reference to one of the essays, Woman and the Alphabet, This article was also published as a tract under the title Ought Women to Learn the Alphabet? Rev. O. B. Frothingham wrote to ask the author if it was abstinence from soups—and salt—and pastry that enabled him to write such papers. Tell me how much liquid, he asked, I must exchange for such a flow of thoughts—how muc<
I am writing behind the bar; many men here— they come up and read our names in the book and wonder what brings so many here from Worcester. One says, Higginson. He's the great abolitionist from Worcester, he who had the fuss in the U. S. Court—is that Theo. Brown beneath? It ought to be Theodore Parker. And in the delight which this excursion gave him, he exclaimed:—I am very happy and feel ready to mount up with wings as eagles. Mr. Higginson wrote an account of this expedition for Putnam's Magazine, the article purporting to be written by a woman. The author amused himself by sending a copy to each member of the party, that they might guess its origin. We did have a charming time on the trip to Mount Katahdin, he wrote. The 30 miles by water on our return, shooting the rapids, were the most exciting experiences I ever yet had. A later visit to Maine was of a different nature, for he spoke at Bangor on Kansas and the Union, the former being the bait and the latter t<
Thomas Wentworth Higginson (search for this): chapter 9
vember, 1853, Mr. F. H. Underwood wrote to Mr. Higginson, asking for aid from his pen for a new litded to insert it. In the diary of 1890, Mr. Higginson wrote, Much gratified at letter from Miss cle, and his would have been half lies. Mr. Higginson himself wrote to Harriet Prescott: .change of scene. One of his journeys took Mr. Higginson to Maine, and he wrote from Orono:— ascent of Mount Katahdin. This letter to Mrs. Higginson was written from Bangor:— I am writiings so many here from Worcester. One says, Higginson. He's the great abolitionist from Worcesterready to mount up with wings as eagles. Mr. Higginson wrote an account of this expedition for Pagain in the daily routine of parish work, Mr. Higginson felt the need of more leisure for thought nt from anything they had seen before. In Mr. Higginson's Atlantic paper, Fayal and the Portuguesery Society. The home-coming from Fayal Mr. Higginson described in this letter to his mother:— [10 more...
A. Bronson Alcott (search for this): chapter 9
IX: the Atlantic Essays In the midst of these public interests, Mr. Higginson did some of the best literary work of his life. In the winter of 1852, he dined with A. Bronson Alcott at James T. Fields', and Mr. Alcott amused himself by guessing, with astonishing success, Mr. Higginson's literary methods. Some of the features he had divined were the young author's habit of bridge-building, of composing much in the open air, and in separate sentences. This analysis the latter declared admirable, and reflected: I might have said to him—in summer I bring home from the woods in my pockets flowers, lichens, chrysalids, nests, brown lizards, baby turtles . . . spiders' eggs . . . and scraps of written paper. In November, 1853, Mr. F. H. Underwood wrote to Mr. Higginson, asking for aid from his pen for a new literary and anti-slavery magazine [the Atlantic Monthly], adding, The articles will all be anonymous. In answer, he wrote: I gladly contribute my name to the list of writers.
ive a charming letter from Agassiz, begging me to collect corals, starfishes, etc., of which I already have a store. And after his return, he reported:— I spent part of yesterday with Prof. Agassiz and enjoyed it very much, and he was delighted with my collection from the Azores especially the sea-urchins, of which he found eight species, some of them new. Some of the things he is to return to me, labelled, for the [Worcester] Natural History Society. The home-coming from Fayal Mr. Higginson described in this letter to his mother:— We arrived last night at 9 1/2 [June, 1856] after a three weeks passage. . . . The world looks very odd, people talking English, lighted shops last night, and horses. To-day everybody with bonnets and shoes! People so well dressed, so intelligent, and so sick—so unlike the robust baseness of Fayal and Pico. And the foliage is so inexpressibly beautiful. Houses agonizingly warm, after the fireless rooms of Fayal, and the chilly o
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