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Bruges (Belgium) (search for this): chapter 12
eared in 1884. He died of consumption, in Lynn, N. C., Sept. 7, 1881. Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth Born in Portland, Me., Feb. 27, 1807. Graduating from Bowdoin College in 1825, he went abroad, and then became professor of modern languages at Bowdoin and later (from 1836 until 1854) at Harvard. The most important of his published works are Hyperion (1839); Voices of the night (1839); Ballads and other poems (1841); Poems on slavery (1842); The Spanish student (1843); The Belfry of Bruges, and Other Poems (1846); Evangeline, a tale of Acadie (1847); Kavanagh (1849); The Seaside and the Fireside (1850); The golden legend (1851); The song of Hiawatha (1855); The Courtship of Aliles Standish (1858); Tales of a Wayside inn (1863); a translation of Dante's Divine Comedy (1867); Flower de Luce (1867); The divine tragedy (1871); Three books of song (1872); Aftermath (1874); The Masque of Pandora (1875); Keramos (1878); Ultima Thule (1880); and In the Harbor (1882). He died in Cambr
West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
d with notes Malte Brun's Geography (3 vols., 1834); assisted Noah Webster in the preparation of his Dictionary of the English language, and wrote several tragedies collected in his Poetical works (1859). Died at Hazel Green, Wis., May 2, 1856. Poe, Edgar Allan Born in Boston, Mass., Jan. 19, 1809. He was partly educated in England and studied at the University of Virginia, and worked for a short time in a counting-room ; then enlisted in the U. S. Army and secured an appointment at West Point, but turned his attention to literature. He was editor of the Southern literary Messenger at Richmond, afterward of Burton's Gentleman's magazine, and of Graham's magazine. He published Tamerlane, and other poems (1827); Al Aaraaf, Tamerlane, and minor poems (1829) ; Poems (1831) ; the narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym (1838) ; The Conchologist's first book (1839) ; tales of the grotesque and Arabesque (2 vols., 1839); Tales (1845) ; The Raven, and other poems (1845); and Eureka, a prose po
Florence (Italy) (search for this): chapter 12
ining to Religion (1842); Miscellaneous writings (1843); Sermons on Theism, Atheism, and popular theology (1852); occasional sermons and speeches (2 vols., 1852); Ten sermons of Religion (1853); Additional speeches and addresses (2 vols., 1855); Trial of Theodore Parker for the Misdemeanor of a speech in Faneuil hall against Kidnapping (1855); a volume of Prayers (1862); and one entitled Historic Americans (1870) includes discourses on Franklin, Washington, Adams and Jefferson. Died in Florence, Italy, May 10, 1860. Parkman, Francis Born in Boston, Mass., Sept. 16, 1823. Graduating at Harvard in 1844, he studied law, but devoted himself to literary work, contributing articles to the Knickerbocker magazine, which were collected and published as The Oregon Trail (1849). Other publications are The Conspiracy of Pontiac (1851) ; Pioneers of France in the New world (1865); The book of Roses (1866); Jesuits in North America (1867); discovery of the great West (1869); The old Regime
Windsor, Conn. (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
his conduct in this connection and volunteered public apology for it. His various publications are The Selling of Joseph (1700); Prospects touching the Accomplishment of Prophecies (1713); A memorial Relating to the Kennebec Indians (1721); and A description of the New Heaven (1727). He is best known for his Diary, covering the period from 1674 to 1729, published by the Massachusetts Historical Society (1878-82). He died in Boston, Mass., Jan. 1, 1730. Sill, Edward Rowland Born in Windsor, Conn., April 29, 1841. Graduating from Yale in 1861, he studied divinity for a time at Harvard and then taught in Ohio; was professor of English literature at the University of California, but resigned to devote himself to literary work. He is the author of The Hermitage and other poems (1867); Venus of Milo and other poems (1883); and Poems (1888), issued after his death. Died in Cleveland, O,, Feb. 27, 1887. Simms, William Gilmore Born in Charleston, S. C., April 17, 1806. He stu
Hazel Green (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
in making a survey of the mineralogy and geology of Connecticut, the results of which are given in his Report of the geology of the state of Connecticut (1842). His poems Prometheus and Clio were published in 1822. He edited Vicesimus Knox's Elegant extracts (1826) ; translated with notes Malte Brun's Geography (3 vols., 1834); assisted Noah Webster in the preparation of his Dictionary of the English language, and wrote several tragedies collected in his Poetical works (1859). Died at Hazel Green, Wis., May 2, 1856. Poe, Edgar Allan Born in Boston, Mass., Jan. 19, 1809. He was partly educated in England and studied at the University of Virginia, and worked for a short time in a counting-room ; then enlisted in the U. S. Army and secured an appointment at West Point, but turned his attention to literature. He was editor of the Southern literary Messenger at Richmond, afterward of Burton's Gentleman's magazine, and of Graham's magazine. He published Tamerlane, and other poems
Dorchester (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 12
eat came out in the North American Review for 1845. The rise of the Dutch Republic was published in three volumes (1856), two volumes of The history of the United Netherlands in 1860, the two concluding volumes in 1868, and The life and death of John of Barneveld, advocate of Holland, with a view of the primary Causes and Movements of the thirty years War (1874). The correspondence of John Lothrop Motley, D. C. L. (1889) was edited by G. W. Curtis. Died at Kingston-Russell house, near Dorchester, Eng., May 29, 1877. Ossoli, Margaret Fuller Born in Cambridge, Mass., May 23, 1810. Extremely precocious in youth, she became a prominent member of the group of Transcendentalists, taught, edited The Dial, and was then literary critic for the New York Tribune; went to Italy and married the Marquis of Ossoli, and was actively interested in the Italian struggle for independence in 1849. She had a remarkable personality and a natural talent for literature. Some of her published works a
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 12
tory, Peter Rugg, the Missing man, originally contributed to the New England Galaxy (1824-26), of which he was editor. Died in Charlestown, ntertaining knowledge, and contributed stories to the Token, the New England magazine, the Knickerbocker, and the Democratic Review. Twice-tois Magnalia Christi Americana; or, the Ecclesiastical history of New England (1702). Died in Boston, Mass., Feb. 13, 1728. Motley, John Lo Her first two novels appeared anonymously, and were entitled A New England tale (1822) and Redwood (1824). Then came The Traveller (1825); an Manufacturer, the Haverhill Gazette, and the Hartford, Conn., New England weekly Review, also contributing to John Neal's magazine, The Yathly he wrote mainly for that. Some of his works are Legends of New England in prose and verse (1831); Moll Pitcher (1832); Poems, chiefly Re prose works: The stranger in Lowell (1845); Supernaturalism in New England (1847); Leaves from Margaret Smith's journal (1849) ; Old Portra
Albany (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
Conn., July 8, 1790. He was for many years a clerk in a banking-house, and formed, in 1819, a literary partnership with Joseph Rodman Drake, publishing anonymously in the New York Evening post a series of good-humored'verses called the Croaker papers. His poem Fanny appeared in 1819 ; Marco Bozzaris (1825); Alnwick castle, with other poems (1827). His Poetical writings (1869) were edited by Gen. J. G. Wilson. He died at Guilford, Conn., Nov. 17, 1867. Harte, Francis Bret Born in Albany, N. Y., Aug. 25, 1839. Went to California in 1854. After attempting various occupations, such as teacher, miner, express-agent and printer's apprentice, he became one of the editors of The golden era, and later editor of The Californian, and The Overland monthly. His first book, Condensed novels, was published in 1867; Poems (1870); The Luck of roaring Camp, and other sketches (1871); East and West poems (1871); Poetical works (1873); Mrs. Skaggs's Husbands (1873); Echoes of the foot Hills (
Thetford (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 12
the New York Tribune; went to Italy and married the Marquis of Ossoli, and was actively interested in the Italian struggle for independence in 1849. She had a remarkable personality and a natural talent for literature. Some of her published works are A summer on the Lakes (1843); Woman in the nineteenth century (1844); and Papers on literature and art (1846). She died, by shipwreck, with her husband and child, off Fire Island Beach, N. Y., July 16, 1850. Paine, Thomas Born in Thetford, Norfolk Co., England, Jan. 29, 1737. He was an exciseman, and having been dismissed from the excise service, emigrated in 1775 to America, where his literary ability brought him the position of editor of the Pennsylvania magazine. He published Comn- Mon sense in 1776; the first number of his Crisis appeared in 1776 ; the Rights of Mlan (1791) and the Age of reason (1794-95). Later, he became a French citizen, was imprisoned, released, and returned to America. Died in New York City, June 8, 18
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ntion to literature. He was editor of the Southern literary Messenger at Richmond, afterward of Burton's Gentleman's magazine, and of Graham's magazine. He published Tamerlane, and other poems (1827); Al Aaraaf, Tamerlane, and minor poems (1829) ; Poems (1831) ; the narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym (1838) ; The Conchologist's first book (1839) ; tales of the grotesque and Arabesque (2 vols., 1839); Tales (1845) ; The Raven, and other poems (1845); and Eureka, a prose poem (1848). Died in Baltimore, Md., Oct. 7, 1849. Prescott, William Hickling Born in Salem, Mass., May 4, 1796. He graduated from Harvard in 1814, and would have studied law, but defective vision forbade, and he turned his attention to history by the aid of readers. His first work was The history of the Reign of Ferdinand and Isabella the Catholic (1838), and was followed by Miscellanies (1845); History of the conquest of Peru (1847); The history of the Reign of Philip II., King of Spain (1855); and the Life
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